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Discussion Starter #1
As I suspected might happen, my brother is *not* going to let me have his corgi. I expected this might happen, so I had already been looking into possibly fostering/volunteering somewhere. I did not expect how hard it would be to find anywhere who would take me on!

I am not kidding. I have contacted at least 5 different organizations about fostering (many more about volunteering) and only one saw fit to get back to me a few weeks later about fostering. Although I made it clear that I would drive, they deemed me too far away (I live 45 minutes away and I wouldn't really need to drive more than once or twice a month max) and turned me down. One organization flat out told me they had too many volunteers already, but seemed slightly more interested in me as a potential foster. The only place that even got back to me about volunteering is an hour from my house and is turning out to really not be doable on any regular basis. I can deal with a long drive (as I live in the middle of nowhere and routinely drive an hour into the city) but these people are not on my way at all. I thought it would be doable as a weekly thing, hence why I applied, but I really don't want to drive that far when it is totally out of my way that often. Though considering the difficulties I am having finding absolutely anyone else, I may just have to deal if I want to volunteer at any shelter.

Is this normal? On their websites and for the two groups that I have managed to speak with in person, they all claim to be desperate for foster homes. And yet when I apply, I hear nothing. I email the appropriate contacts at shelters and get nothing. Why am I having so much difficulty? The entire reason I want to foster is to help pups in need, but I don't think I have the long term stability to adopt. I am experienced with dogs, especially fearful/reactive ones, and because of my education I am well-versed in behavior modification. Despite living in a big condo, I have access to miles of excellent dog-walking areas with deer, Canada geese, groundhogs, etc. to snuffle as well as people to interact with. I also am home quite a bit. I figured all of these traits would make me a good foster, but I guess not since no one seems interested at all.

I just needed to vent about how silly this is. If anyone reads this, thanks for letting me vent. And if you can think of any idea why I am not hearing back from these places, let me know.
 

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I've had similar experiences with some shelters and rescue groups. I do try and remind myself that these are mostly volunteers so I cut them a bit of slack as far as being slow getting in touch or at least responding to let you know they received your offer to volunteer or foster.

Be patient is all I can advise. Keep reaching out and you will find a group or shelter who will accept and welcome your offer to help. I do transport for a few groups. I connected with some through friends and others through chance meetings at dog events. I volunteer at a very small local shelter. I have seen firsthand how little time the shelter manager has to deal with email, phone messages, etc. She needs help but can't find the time to get organized. Many people in rescue and at shelters have a huge desire to help dogs but not all of them (few, in fact) are good with the nuts and bolts of organizing volunteers and getting fosters lined up and approved.

I do know how maddening and frustrating it can be to want to help and feel you're being rebuffed and ignored. I feel for you and hope you can hook up with a group or shelter who recognizes what you can offer. As I said, keep trying. Network with dog friends and at adoption events, dog shows, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I do realize these people are volunteers so I try to be (somewhat patient). It can be hard though for sure. It does make me feel a little better knowing that other people have dealt with this before. I probably will go back to Petsmart tomorrow when one group is there. I'll just say "How do you like me so far?" or something to that effect.
 

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I agree that going to the shelters and rescues in person may be best. It's harder to ignore someone who is physically there, then it is to ignore, or put off answering, an e-mail. Going in person will also show them that you are serious and willing to go the extra mile to help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I figured going in person might help, so i went back again today to the adoption event one place was holding at a pet store.The dog people weren't there today (they were last week), but I spoke to someone at least and got to say hi to the bunny for adoption. I did finally hear back from them, so hey finally are going to get me in touch with the volunteer coordinator. Hopefully it works out! I like everyone I have met so far at least.
 

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It is the holiday season so maybe these organizations are focused on other responsibilities right now...therefore the inaction toward potential fosters. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well good news! I finally got in touch someone at a rescue! I have a date set to go to the shelter, take a look around, and to set me up to foster soon(ish). It sure did take some doing, however.
 
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