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So here it goes I have 2 french bulldogs a 2 year old male who is perfect in every way had no problems with him he has a lovely nature.
The 2nd one on the other hand totally different story!
He is 5 months old and we have had him since he was 16 weeks. He started off a little bit food aggressive with his bones with my other dog but that soon calmed down. Recently though he has bit my son more than once who is 4 years old. My poor son is so good the dogs and it all came out of the blue! So this is the problem It is only when we are in the kitchen serving food. Today when I was dishing up dinner (our dinner) and my son comes in to sit at the table to eat and Rocky the puppy goes for him as he walked past the table to sit down! He actually lunges and bites him as if to say that's his food? He also did it when me and my son baked a cake the other day, my son stood off the chair after mixing the cake mix and Rocky went for him as soon as my sons feet touched the floor! Again lunging and biting him! The last straw was I was making a homemade hair mask all food ingredients I went into the bathroom to put it in my hair Rocky followed me and sat watching me I didn't think anything of it untill my son came to use the toilet and Rocky launched at him at bit him again! As if he's again saying back off that's his food! I've searched the internet and can't find any advice on this type of food agression/resource guarding only the usually sort of guarding bowls etc which he doesn't do. How do I deal with this please? How do I train this out of him? I don't want to re-home him but I will have to if this Carries on! My son has already had several puncture wounds this last 2 days! Any advice please? I just don't know what to do I feel like I'm on edge I don't want my son to get hurt again.
 

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I have a resource guarder, but he only guards food once he regards it as his (which is basically when he has it in his mouth or his bowl), and my sons were late teens when he arrived. I think you need to do three things:

1) Manage him - when there is any food around, shut him in another room, crate, dog playpen, whatever. This needs to become second nature, to protect your son.

2) Because you have such a young son, I think you need a behaviourist who can come in and observe what is happening. Choose carefully - you want someone who is force free, doesn't recommend any form of punishment, and doesn't talk about reducing the dog's status or rank in the family. The Association of Pet Dog Trainers is a good place to start.

3) If you think you may need to rehome the dog (and knowing what it can be like living with a resource guarder even when there aren't children involved, I think that would be an entirely reasonable decision), it is better to do it while he is still young and before he gives a more serious bite - rehoming a dog with a bite history can be very difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much for replying to me JudyN.
I will definitely start with keeping him away from the kitchen area when we are dealing with food. It's very strange because if we have food on the sofa Rocky doesn't behaved that way it just seems to be food that dealt with in the kitchen.

I was thinking I will need a behaviourist. What sort of techniques could I try in the mean time?

It breaks my heart the thought of rehoming him but it breaks my heart more knowing my son could be hurt. I feel like time is on my hands and I need to get this sorted quickly.
 

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I honestly wouldn't like to suggest any techniques because, as you say, this isn't the usual scenario and not one I have experience of. For now, I think it should all be about management - possibly the kitchen should be a no-go area for the dog at any time, as he could regard a dirty plate or empty packet on the worktop as 'food'. And do find an behaviourist - when a child is at risk of getting bitten, it can be risky to rely on information found on the internet. Good luck!
 

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Hi Sunshine22,

I'm so sorry that this has happened.

First, I'd like to share this thread with you. It contains very helpful videos, a guide to dog body language, and links to articles.


Secondly, we take bites very seriously on this Forum, especially when they involve children. Here is our Forum's policy:

If your dog’s behavior has escalated to the point of biting and drawing blood, the internet is not where you should be.It is the responsibility of the dog owner to prevent bites from happening and should your dog bite someone else you could be held civilly ($) and criminally (jail) responsible, and your dog may be euthanized. It is for the seriousness surrounding dog bites that we, The Dog Forum Team, will again make a judgment call and may close/remove/edit a thread once your dog has bitten someone, even yourself. Home interventions may have worked before the bite, but it is the general consensus that you find a professional trainer and/or behaviorist to help you solve the problem-BEFORE someone gets seriously hurt.

To locate a behaviorist/trainer, please visit.

Int. Assoc. of Animal Behavior Consultants

American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior

American College of Veterinary Behaviorists

The Certified Council of Pet Dog Trainers

Pet Professional Guild

At this point, we very much want to offer you our support, but we cannot provide additional tips and recommendations. We want your child to be happy and safe.

Thanks for understanding.
 

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First, and I strongly urge this, as the others have said you need to get a behaviorist on board since he's already escalated to biting.

Next, again, as has been said management. He must not be put into a position to practice the resource guarding. So whenever food is involved, and it does not matter what room it's in, he cannot be around. So if y'all are having a movie night and sitting on the couch eating popcorn he needs to be contained, you can give him an extra yummy stuffed Kong, or a nice chew.

Last get the book Mine! A practical guide to resource guarding, by Jean Donaldson Mine! A Practical Guide to Resource Guarding in Dogs: Jean Donaldson: 9780970562944: Amazon.com: Books It'll help you work with him while you search for a behaviorist.

Please know, resource guarding is a natural behavior and he really isn't a bad boy. Nearly all dogs will guard something or other. My own boy resource guards my apartment like his life depends on it. I had another dog that would go grad a small mouthful of food from his bowl, put the food on his bed then lay down on top of it and guard it from my other dog and cat, and that's not counting his habit of guarding chews that he had no interest in chewing but had decided that Jersey (my other dog) should not have.
 

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To add to Rain's wonderful advice, here is a thread on resource guarding:


Still, we cannot urge you enough to get professional help. Your child and your dog are both depending on you to keep them safe, and it just takes a few seconds of your guard being down for something to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all so much for all the advice. I did not sleep at all last night worrying about this. I will be seeking professional advice today.
 

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I see you are in the UK, if you want to say roughly what area you are in, perhaps we might be aware of someone near you. Also, your insurance may cover the cost.
 

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I am totally amazed that you would keep a dog that would cause your child pain by opening puncture wounds in your son’s body. How traumatic do you think this is for your child and why on earth would you continue to let this happen? If only had this dog a month and he has already cause serious problems for your child. Are you waiting until something serious happens? This dog is not for your family.
 

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Hi @Sunshine22,

Do you have any update? Obviously, we're all concerned about your family, especially your young son.

I actually agree with Gloria. Your child deserves to live in a safe home. Management can only go so far, and you cannot risk another encounter like the ones you've already had. I'm also afraid that your son will develop a fear of dogs. Some three decades ago, I was bitten by a friend's husky. The bite was actually my fault, but to this day, I'm not comfortable around that breed. I'm just not. The memory of having half of my hand in that dog's mouth and hoping that he'd let go made a lasting impression. I think that your son is going to be happier just with the older, sweeter dog.

The challenge you'll have is rehoming your dog. Can you return him to his breeder, shelter, or rescue group? In any case, you'll need to be upfront about the dog's behavior. I know that this is very difficult. However, as a mom, you have to put your child above all else.







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