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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, my husband and I are going camping next weekend and want to take the puppers. This will be her first camping trip ever... I am a little nervous. Her leash training has gotten better and she is genuinely a happy, playful pup. She has a high prey drive and I worry we are going to spend the entire weekend trying to keep her from chasing every little critter.
On our walks we encounter a lot of squirrels and stray cats. Her response to them varies from wanting to chase to just watching them.
Any tips on making this an enjoyable time for the both of us?
Thank you 馃榿.
 

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I think you may have to resign yourself to the possibility that you may spend the whole trip trying to curb her prey enthusiasm. Or, you may not. You won't know until you give it a try, and if I were you I would go for it!

Since she has a varying response to squirrels, this trip gives you a great opportunity to work on this with her. Keep her on leash, of course, and carry a lot of little treats with you. If she just watches the critter go by, praise her and give her treats. If she tries to chase, simply turn around and go in the other direction with her. This will be a very distracting environment for her, so make sure your patience is at full. And best of luck. Most likely it will be lots of fun and some good learning for the pup. I love to camp with my dogs!
 

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My dog has benefitted hugely from my teaching her to "point" at animals. Not a real point like a hunting dog, but I have her sit and stare at the animal, and reinforce that by saying good girl, and, if possible, moving calmly closer. Afterwards, she gets a toy or treat (usually toy, she doesn't usually want a treat, and even getting her to want the toy took a long time) reward. If she pulls or barks like crazy, or jumps, or tries to take off, I calmly go the other way. When she calms down, I let her go back. If possible, good behavior is rewarded by letting her smell where the thing was or track it for a short (very short) distance- which is what she really wants. This has been what has- eventually- allowed me to be confident with my dog off-lead.

But as far as making it enjoyable... Camping is spending time with your dog, doing things you both love, and having fun- so it'll be enjoyable, even if there is some overexcited prey-chasing behavior. Just remember to be patient and understanding, she's only doing hat she does naturally. And be sure to give an outlet for her prey instincts- bring a long lead and play fetch, or hide her dinner in a field and have her "hunt" for it. (or treats, but dinner tends to work better because there's more of it, and because the dog will be in "food mode" as opposed to just going into the field and sniffing at rabbit trails) And let her smell animal tracks and do some "tracking"
 

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but I have her sit and stare at the animal,
I'd be cautious about teaching this. To a dog, a stare can be quite intimidating body language, just like eyeballing is to humans. A good example is boxers being weighed in before a big fight (it's very obvious because it is deliberately very, very exaggerated).
 

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I'd be cautious about teaching this. To a dog, a stare can be quite intimidating body language, just like eyeballing is to humans. A good example is boxers being weighed in before a big fight (it's very obvious because it is deliberately very, very exaggerated).
I just have my pup "watch" the stimili. I give the cue to "watch" and reward him for doing so calmly.

I encourage him to sniff animal tracks and I also allow him to sniff where the animal was as @Kensi suggested. Keeping it fun and allowing them to do what they love most in a controlled manner is great as it keeps him from taking it upon himself to investigate.
 

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I'd be cautious about teaching this. To a dog, a stare can be quite intimidating body language, just like eyeballing is to humans. A good example is boxers being weighed in before a big fight (it's very obvious because it is deliberately very, very exaggerated).
I don't do this with other dogs- just prey animals. Is this still an issue, or was I just unclear in my post?
 

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I have been taking my dogs camping for years. Both Moose-dog and Bat-dog were "mighty lizard hunters". They could ignore a squirrel, but the sight of a lizard basking in the sun would have them charging. They would even start watching for lizards as soon as they saw granite rocks. I never got them to stop completely, but I did learn to anticipate it and redirect their attention before they saw the lizard.

Some tricks I have learned about camping with dogs:

1. forget the tie outs. Just use a leash. That way you are always in control of your dog and are close enough to prevent a problem. The only time I use a tie out is for nighttime and early morning potty breaks - I keep the 15ft tie outs attached to the RV door and hook the dog(s) to it so they can go outside and potty while I stay inside. Just have to remember to look before you step when you get up (I clean up at that point).

2. No one expects your dog to be perfect. Most people just want to see you are doing what you can to teach your dog good camping ettiquette. If your dog is a barker, make the effort to stop the barking and most people will be happy. Ignore the barking and people will get peturbed or worse.

3. Don't walk your dog around the campground for potty time. Non-dog people don't want to see your dog pooping or peeing at their site instead of yours. Teach your dog to do his business "at home" and save the walks for entertainment. It doesn't matter that you "always clean up" - if you don't let your dog poop/pee at your site, why would you think others want it pooping/peeing at their site.

4. Always carry poop bags and use them. Even with #3 above, poop happens so be prepared.

5. Make your dog part of the activity. Don't leave your dog tied to a tree while the family plays. You are outdoors and dogs love the outdoors. Hiking, swimming, exploring are all great fun for dogs.

6. Always obey the campground leash laws. It doesn't matter that your dog "is so well behaved" or "always listens to you". First, when people see your dog off-leash, they decide it's OK for their dog to be offleash - and their dog might not be so perfect and then suddenly dogs are banned. Second, that leash can be used to pull your dog away from a not so good unleashed dog, rattlesnake or venomous snake, coyote, cougar, bear, sinkhole, etc.

7. When on trails, move off the trail so others can pass. Just because your dog is friendly doesn't mean others are comfortable passing them. Give people the ability to go around at a safe distance. Same for other dogs. Do not let your dog initiate nose contact unless the other person specifically OKs it.

8. Get a "camping/outdoor activity" ID tag. On this tag, include your vehicle and/or RV plate number as well as your cell phone number. When out in the wilderness, your cell phone may be useless, but if someone finds your dog, they can search for your vehicle/RV in the campground.
 

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I have been taking my dogs camping for years. Both Moose-dog and Bat-dog were "mighty lizard hunters". They could ignore a squirrel, but the sight of a lizard basking in the sun would have them charging. They would even start watching for lizards as soon as they saw granite rocks. I never got them to stop completely, but I did learn to anticipate it and redirect their attention before they saw the lizard.

Some tricks I have learned about camping with dogs:

1. forget the tie outs. Just use a leash. That way you are always in control of your dog and are close enough to prevent a problem. The only time I use a tie out is for nighttime and early morning potty breaks - I keep the 15ft tie outs attached to the RV door and hook the dog(s) to it so they can go outside and potty while I stay inside. Just have to remember to look before you step when you get up (I clean up at that point).

2. No one expects your dog to be perfect. Most people just want to see you are doing what you can to teach your dog good camping ettiquette. If your dog is a barker, make the effort to stop the barking and most people will be happy. Ignore the barking and people will get peturbed or worse.

3. Don't walk your dog around the campground for potty time. Non-dog people don't want to see your dog pooping or peeing at their site instead of yours. Teach your dog to do his business "at home" and save the walks for entertainment. It doesn't matter that you "always clean up" - if you don't let your dog poop/pee at your site, why would you think others want it pooping/peeing at their site.

4. Always carry poop bags and use them. Even with #3 above, poop happens so be prepared.

5. Make your dog part of the activity. Don't leave your dog tied to a tree while the family plays. You are outdoors and dogs love the outdoors. Hiking, swimming, exploring are all great fun for dogs.

6. Always obey the campground leash laws. It doesn't matter that your dog "is so well behaved" or "always listens to you". First, when people see your dog off-leash, they decide it's OK for their dog to be offleash - and their dog might not be so perfect and then suddenly dogs are banned. Second, that leash can be used to pull your dog away from a not so good unleashed dog, rattlesnake or venomous snake, coyote, cougar, bear, sinkhole, etc.

7. When on trails, move off the trail so others can pass. Just because your dog is friendly doesn't mean others are comfortable passing them. Give people the ability to go around at a safe distance. Same for other dogs. Do not let your dog initiate nose contact unless the other person specifically OKs it.

8. Get a "camping/outdoor activity" ID tag. On this tag, include your vehicle and/or RV plate number as well as your cell phone number. When out in the wilderness, your cell phone may be useless, but if someone finds your dog, they can search for your vehicle/RV in the campground.
This is the best list of rules/advice for camping with dogs that I've ever seen.

All I would add is that when you are doing dispersed camping, which is camping in a wilderness area that doesn't have a designated campground, everything above still applies. I never camp in campgrounds, preferring dispersed camping.

Don't think that because you are not around other people you can let your dog run free. You have no idea what is out there, and the chances are higher in the wilderness than in campgrounds populated with people of your dog disturbing wildlife. I have found that walking my dog with a very long lead works well in wilderness areas. And please still pick up the poop. Other people may come to camp there the same way you did.
 

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Hello, my husband and I are going camping next weekend and want to take the puppers. This will be her first camping trip ever... I am a little nervous. Her leash training has gotten better and she is genuinely a happy, playful pup. She has a high prey drive and I worry we are going to spend the entire weekend trying to keep her from chasing every little critter.
On our walks we encounter a lot of squirrels and stray cats. Her response to them varies from wanting to chase to just watching them.
Any tips on making this an enjoyable time for the both of us?
Thank you 馃榿.
I don't know where you live, but I would make sure that your dogs are protected against heartworms, ticks etc.
This is the time of year when the pests emerge.
 

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Absolutely on both of those.

A sibling's dog jumped into a snow runoff cement canal once. He almost drowned in the fast moving current before they could climb out a branch and grab his collar as he flowed by. A leash would have prevented that.

And ticks are already out in force where I am located. And don't forget to carry a tick remover.

Oh, and another thing to carry always is a copy of your dog's rabies certificate. I keep a copy in the car, the motorhome and the trailer. It can mean the difference between your dog being confiscated or going home with you - whether your dog bites someone/thing or someone/thing bites your dog.
 

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Absolutely on both of those.

A sibling's dog jumped into a snow runoff cement canal once. He almost drowned in the fast moving current before they could climb out a branch and grab his collar as he flowed by. A leash would have prevented that.

And ticks are already out in force where I am located. And don't forget to carry a tick remover.

Oh, and another thing to carry always is a copy of your dog's rabies certificate. I keep a copy in the car, the motorhome and the trailer. It can mean the difference between your dog being confiscated or going home with you - whether your dog bites someone/thing or someone/thing bites your dog.
Great idea....I never thought of taking along a copy of the rabies certs. I will be making copies for my car! (3 dogs worth..LOL)
Luckily in Reno, we don't have heartworm, fleas, or ticks, but they are close. Toiyabe National Forest is not far off and they are loaded with ticks etc. (Lake Tahoe area)
 

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I'm on the other side of the mountains from you - Sac.

I have my two dogs' and my two cats' certs in each vehicle (the cats camp too). I figure it's cheap insurance. Fortunately the bird doesn't require vaccinations.
 
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I'm on the other side of the mountains from you - Sac.

I have my two dogs' and my two cats' certs in each vehicle (the cats camp too). I figure it's cheap insurance. Fortunately the bird doesn't require vaccinations.
This is really odd, but despite Heartworm, the Dog Flu, Ticks etc getting very close, they have never gotten a foothold in Reno. I am not in the City proper, but in the lower foothills of Tahoe..Too close for comfort and one of mine is a Border Collie/Lab cross,and another is an Aussie (never tested for the MDR1 gene) so I would be in trouble if Heartworm got closer.

Last fishing trip (without the dogs), in the Truckee at Tahoe. resulted in me getting covered in ticks (on my clothing..not on me)
 

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I'm seeing a huge uptick (no pun intended) in mosquitos, fleas, and ticks here in the valley. Enough so, that I have put both my dogs on heartworm.

I used to work for CA State Parks and saw the conditions of many campground water supplies. Dead animals, animal feces around the water tank access, etc. With lepto on the rise in the area and frequent camping where the dogs drink the local water (spigots, lakes, creeks, rivers, etc), I have also vaccinated them for lepto.
 

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The other thing I would never leave home without is a microchip in the dog(s) and I always have the chip numbers and company's phone number(s) in my wallet AND in my phone.

Microchip is a very good thing to have no matter what, but is vital in getting your dog back again if lost far from home.
 

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I'm seeing a huge uptick (no pun intended) in mosquitos, fleas, and ticks here in the valley. Enough so, that I have put both my dogs on heartworm.

I used to work for CA State Parks and saw the conditions of many campground water supplies. Dead animals, animal feces around the water tank access, etc. With lepto on the rise in the area and frequent camping where the dogs drink the local water (spigots, lakes, creeks, rivers, etc), I have also vaccinated them for lepto.
That is not a good sign.
Reno is in the throws of another major drought and our mosquito abatement program has already begun. My fingers are crossed since my vet's practice was bought out, and besides Covid restrictions, it is impossible to get in. It 's the same all over town or I would have switched vets a long time ago (however my vet doctors for over 10 yrs is still there). My last experience was last month; when I had to make an appointment for booster shots 6 weeks in advance. Walking used to be an extra $15...Now they are $75 extra!

Our rabies certs have the dog's microchip number embedded on the form.
 

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I hate finding a new vet. Fortunately the one I have now is great. There are actually three vets at the practice, but we've only seen two of them. I can get in within the week for shots or general checkup. Major concerns, I can usually get in the same day or the next. Covid has actually made it easier as they don't have people talking through the appointment delaying the next one.

All my pets got their microchips from different sources, and therefore were set up with different companies. I ended up registering them all with freepetchipregistry. They don't charge registration fees and they accept all chip brands. Now everyone is registered in the same place so I don't have to try to remember who is where.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Update, camping went way better than expected. Thank you all for your encouragement, tips and tricks. Patience is key as well as a cable tie out. I made the rookie mistake of not bringing one and my dog chewed through her leash on the first day.
I originally intended for her to sleep in her crate but at the last minute my husband decided not to take it. Instead she slept in our tent, in bed, with us. I dont like the idea of a dog sleeping in a human bed, however it was such a sweet bonding experience. To wake up to her puppy eyes every morning, to feel her cuddle up in between us, just hearing her little snore brought so much joy to the trip.
Here is an pic from the trip
250322
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have been taking my dogs camping for years. Both Moose-dog and Bat-dog were "mighty lizard hunters". They could ignore a squirrel, but the sight of a lizard basking in the sun would have them charging. They would even start watching for lizards as soon as they saw granite rocks. I never got them to stop completely, but I did learn to anticipate it and redirect their attention before they saw the lizard.

Some tricks I have learned about camping with dogs:

1. forget the tie outs. Just use a leash. That way you are always in control of your dog and are close enough to prevent a problem. The only time I use a tie out is for nighttime and early morning potty breaks - I keep the 15ft tie outs attached to the RV door and hook the dog(s) to it so they can go outside and potty while I stay inside. Just have to remember to look before you step when you get up (I clean up at that point).

2. No one expects your dog to be perfect. Most people just want to see you are doing what you can to teach your dog good camping ettiquette. If your dog is a barker, make the effort to stop the barking and most people will be happy. Ignore the barking and people will get peturbed or worse.

3. Don't walk your dog around the campground for potty time. Non-dog people don't want to see your dog pooping or peeing at their site instead of yours. Teach your dog to do his business "at home" and save the walks for entertainment. It doesn't matter that you "always clean up" - if you don't let your dog poop/pee at your site, why would you think others want it pooping/peeing at their site.

4. Always carry poop bags and use them. Even with #3 above, poop happens so be prepared.

5. Make your dog part of the activity. Don't leave your dog tied to a tree while the family plays. You are outdoors and dogs love the outdoors. Hiking, swimming, exploring are all great fun for dogs.

6. Always obey the campground leash laws. It doesn't matter that your dog "is so well behaved" or "always listens to you". First, when people see your dog off-leash, they decide it's OK for their dog to be offleash - and their dog might not be so perfect and then suddenly dogs are banned. Second, that leash can be used to pull your dog away from a not so good unleashed dog, rattlesnake or venomous snake, coyote, cougar, bear, sinkhole, etc.

7. When on trails, move off the trail so others can pass. Just because your dog is friendly doesn't mean others are comfortable passing them. Give people the ability to go around at a safe distance. Same for other dogs. Do not let your dog initiate nose contact unless the other person specifically OKs it.

8. Get a "camping/outdoor activity" ID tag. On this tag, include your vehicle and/or RV plate number as well as your cell phone number. When out in the wilderness, your cell phone may be useless, but if someone finds your dog, they can search for your vehicle/RV in the campground.
I remember #3 for future trips.
I had to use a tie out during set up and tear down. She got bored really quickly but other than that she was great.
All of your tips were great advice 馃榿
 
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