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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey ,
In the last couple of months I was looking for a dog breed.It will be my first dog(not first pet,I've got parrots when I was younger so I understand the commitment for a pet).My choices are pretty selfish but I wonder if an english bull terrier/staffy/amstaff would be a complete disaster,I've wanted to get such a breed since I was a kid but a terrier is a challenge especially for a first time dog owner.The puppy(whatever it will be) will be bought froma reputable breeder (In my country we have some great amstaff lines)
My situation:
Currently I'm working from home 4/5 days so I can be at home for most of the day
Jogging pretty much everyday between 1.5-2 hours(with a dog i would be willing to go for ~3 hour walks when I'm not busy)
I live alone(no kids/animals in my household)
I have a a big courtyard and a forest nearby for walks
I'm working at night so I will sleep till noon
My expectations:
No human aggression(lots of people come to my home and I wish that my dog could stay together with my friends but that shouldn't be a problem if he is socialised
Healthy(from what I've read all of these breeds are healthy if screened properly for any genetic problem)

I'm not buying any of these breeds to look like a tough guy or to get attention from other people that are afraid of them.Amstaffs must wear a muzzle on every public space in my country, is that a problem for the dog ?
 

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A short answer is: basket muzzles-emphasis on basket-type-when fitted and introduced correctly should not be a problem. This type allows panting and access to water and even treats. Those that keep the mouth completely closed can cause distress and health emergencies like overheating, and should be avoided.

Longer answers: I must warn you about puppies though. Depending on the individual, the puppy will likely need to be let out once or twice a night/sleep cycle for a couple months. Which means you're up too. They will also need to be let out ~ 15 minutes after eating, drinking, playing, and waking from a nap. They like to wake up early. You can work on training them to sleep longer, but there will not be much sleeping for a bit. Until their plates close, exercise needs to be mindful of their joints to avoid arthritis and such on their senior years.

If this didn't scare you off puppies (not my intention), I highly recommend talking to and visiting those reputable breeders and owners of those breeds in depth. They can tell you more about their lines, the reality of living with a large terrier/breed of choice, and evaluate aspects of your life and temperament that don't come across in the internet. You can also find more info about puppy raising and breeders on our parent forum page with the pinned posts.

Welcome to the forum and we love pictures. Especially of puppies. 馃榾
 

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I agree with the above that wearing a muzzle in public, since it is the law, will not be a problem for the dog as long as it's the right kind of muzzle, and it is introduced to the dog properly. Which means starting when the dog is young and going very, very slowly in the introduction, taking it in baby steps and at least a week of the introduction before putting the muzzle on the dog and fastening it. Since you haven't had a dog before, you will benefit from instruction on how to do this, so ask us if you decide on that breed, and we can help. :)
 

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I think you would be a good candidate for the breeds you listed. However, you might want to check out some rescues or shelters before going to a breeder. Those breeds especially get put in rescues and shelters, even as puppies. So I would do that beforehand.
And a muzzle is just fine for the dog, don鈥檛 worry. You just have to get the dog used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you would be a good candidate for the breeds you listed. However, you might want to check out some rescues or shelters before going to a breeder. Those breeds especially get put in rescues and shelters, even as puppies. So I would do that beforehand.
And a muzzle is just fine for the dog, don鈥檛 worry. You just have to get the dog used to it.
I'm quite afraid of bull looking dog from a shelter in my country as many breeders are complete jokes and train their dogs to be aggressive with people which is a big problem.My friends/family can take care of the dog when I go to work(2-3 people will do that, would it be confusing for the dog ?)
I'm ready to let him go out during the night/morning.
I plan on letting the dog stay in my room(not my bed) and i work untill 2-3 am would that damage his health ? Or is a dog fine with staying up in the night ?Could I go for a walk at 2-3 am ? This would be pretty important in the summer as we got some very hot days in Romania(40 degrees celsius sometimes even more)
Also sorry if my english is quite rubbish.
 

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i plan on letting the dog stay in my room(not my bed) and i work untill 2-3 am would that damage his health ? Or is a dog fine with staying up in the night ?Could I go for a walk at 2-3 am ? This would be pretty important in the summer as we got some very hot days in Romania(40 degrees celsius sometimes even more)
Also sorry if my english is quite rubbish.
First of all, your English is quite good, so don't worry about that!

Your dog will likely sleep while you work, or while you sleep. Walking when it's cool out sounds like a good idea in the heat of the summer. But it won't likely do much for socialization, which is very important with a puppy!

They really need to see cars and trucks and joggers and strollers and other dogs and people and other animals and basements and stairs and everything else out in the world that the might encounter in order to be comfortable around these things later on!

So for a puppy especially it would be important to expose them to as many things as possible as soon as it's possible (vaccinated fully!).

Here's a good idea list for socializing a puppy:

 

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I'm sure the dog will be fine with other people taking care of him, it will just become part of the routine.

Muzzles need to be introduced in a positive, reward based way. When I trained my dog to wear one we had a muzzle party (yay - it's muzzle time!!!)

This video may help.


I agree socialisation is important, that list @BigBlackDog gave is quite specific to the person who gave it as an example. This graphic may help too.

FB_IMG_1612002488906.jpg
 

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I would stay away from the the English Bull Terrier. I like them as a breed they have a funny, quirky temperament but are not suited for a first time dog owner. Here is a link comparing all three breeds. ttps://www.akc.org/compare-breeds/?selected=%5B23324%5D
 

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I'm quite afraid of bull looking dog from a shelter in my country as many breeders are complete jokes and train their dogs to be aggressive with people which is a big problem.
This may be an intelligent and informed choice for you to make. I just want to put in a word on that. I also live in an area where bully breeds are bred for fighting. But they are also kept as household and family pets very often. A shelter dog may be there for any number of reasons from his owner dying, to the owner giving up on simple training, to the owner moving......it is possible to find a sweet and good dog of any breed in a shelter.

On the other hand, a rescue is most often a better choice for a first time dog owner, because if you have a good talk with the person fostering the dog, they will know if there dog is right for you or not. They have lived with the dog for 2 weeks to 6 months, and know his characteristics.

Getting a 6 month or one or two year old dog from a rescue is your very best bet. You are going into it far more informed about the dog you have by doing this than if you get a puppy. You will have a good idea of what you are getting. This is what I always recommend for a first time owner, because you are so much less likely to end up with problems. It's best to make it as easy for you as possible for the first dog. Not saying you still couldn't run into unknowns or issues. But you go into it knowing more.
 
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