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I tried to post here yesterday but my power went out. That happens a lot here.
The first aid kit should always include activated charcoal. It is okay to induce vomiting but sometimes, by the time the dog has been driven to the emergency clinic and been through reception, it is too late. If activated charcoal is given at home a lot of poisoning deaths can be avoided.
Also, when wounds are taken care of do not use peroxide. There is too much tissue damage. Keep a small bottle of chlorhexidine or betadine in your kit. Hydrogen peroxide is great for cleaning up though, both you and the dog.
 

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I can relate your post. I have some of the first aid kit that you posted and just like you I need some advice about the other kit for my dog.

Thank you for your post. I really apprecite it. Hoping somebody will add your post here.
 

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I tried to post here yesterday but my power went out. That happens a lot here.
The first aid kit should always include activated charcoal. It is okay to induce vomiting but sometimes, by the time the dog has been driven to the emergency clinic and been through reception, it is too late. If activated charcoal is given at home a lot of poisoning deaths can be avoided.
Also, when wounds are taken care of do not use peroxide. There is too much tissue damage. Keep a small bottle of chlorhexidine or betadine in your kit. Hydrogen peroxide is great for cleaning up though, both you and the dog.
H.Peroxide (H202) will get blood out of most cloth, even after several days. Dr recently used it to get betadine out of his lab coat. (I didn't think anything would get betadine out.) Check exp. dates.

I need to make a first aid kit. But tough to remember to take in the car, can't leave it in there because liquids will freeze.

Where do you get LR(lactated ringers)? and how do you use it in first aid?
Sterile normal saline is great to irrigate the wounds, and can cool an over heated dog. Use in the bag and you can use it again.

Have never tried to check a puppy pulse, I assume neck and along the leg would be common pulse points?

I used horse wound spray(the kind that makes the wound purple) on a dogs claw, when it got it caught in a trampline when it jumped off. Never did figure out how: 1 it did it in the first place, and two it didn't rip the claw off completely. It didn't say it should only be used on horses.
 

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I see no reason for having LRS in a first aid kit. If your dog has parvo take it in for hospitilization.
Even tap water is okay to flush a wound, but physiologic saline is better.
To check the pulse on a dog, find the artery that runs along the femur on the inside of the back leg. You should do a brief physical exam on your dog every week. It will take about five minutes and if there is an abnormality you will know about it sooner. Do It Yourself Physical Exam for Your Dog will tell you more details.
 

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Also maybe a Gatorade or Pedialyte and a needleless syringe if the dog was dehydrated.

Can you please list an example of a caustic substance? I googled the word but that didnt help... :eek:

bleach? :confused:
a little late but:

As a general rule do not induce vomiting unless your vet instructs you to, but anything that says on the bottle "If Swallowed to not induce vomiting call poison control" is caustic and should not be vomited back up. For example: Lye will do more damage being vomited up than being allowed to pass through.
 

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I definitely know there is no substitution for vet care, but I'm looking into doing a first aid kit for Mikey (I know there are some on the market but I want to have it tailored and not missing anything).

I have and have needed on numerous occaisions a first aid kit (home made) for my rabbits-it's come in handy more times then I can count. When rabbits get sick it's always an emergency and it is sometimes a miracle to get them through the night to the vet office-a first aid kit is needed for sure.

I realized a needed one when I found that seed pod in Mikey's eye the other day-I had to go the bunny first aid kit and steal :eek:


I was thinking

~Vet wrap
~thermometer (plastic not glass)
~polysporin
~peroxide (disinfecting and encouraging vomit should chocolate or the like be ingested)
~styptic
~maybe metacam?
~critical care (carnivore)
~syringes
~pedialyte

Sooo what do you guys have in your first aid kits? What's essential?



Basic first-aid supplies


  • Absorbent gauze pads
  • Adhesive tape
  • Antiseptic wipes, lotion, powder or spray
  • Blanket (a foil emergency blanket)
  • Cotton balls or swabs
  • Gauze rolls
  • Hydrogen peroxide (to induce vomiting—do this only when directed by a veterinarian or a poison-control expert)
  • Ice pack
  • Non-latex disposable gloves
  • Petroleum jelly (to lubricate the thermometer)
  • Rectal thermometer (your pet's temperature should not rise above 103°F or fall below 100°F)
  • Scissors (with blunt ends)
  • Sterile non-stick gauze pads for bandages
  • Sterile saline solution (sold at pharmacies)
  • Tweezers
  • A pillowcase to confine your cat for treatment
  • A pet carrier
 

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For first aid, I find this blog helpful. Especially when I live in a place that's prone to flooding and need to be ready to pack up each time a storm comes in.

"Your pet's first aid kit should include bandages, scissors, sterile saline eyewash, hydrogen peroxide to disinfect the wound, a small number of regular pet medications to ensure your pet's health such as styptic powder to stop bleeding, sugar tablets for diabetic and pets with low blood sugar, diphenhydramine (or Benadryl) for mild allergic reactions, thermometer, treats for distracting pet, and most importantly, your vet's contact number."
 

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Over time, my dog first-aid kit grew to quite large proportions. Things I have:
  • bandages or bandaging materials
  • a non-stick sterile wound dressing
  • blunt-tip scissors
  • tweezers
  • sterile saline
  • rubbing alcohol
  • 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • water (if traveling or hiking)
  • betadine
  • styptic powder
  • rectal thermometer
  • lubricating jelly
  • corn syrup
  • clean syringe (without needle)
  • muzzle/restraints
  • activated charcoal
  • antibiotic ointment
  • Benadryl
  • tick removal tool
  • old credit card (this is for removal of stingers)
  • protective gloves
  • flashlight
  • towel or rag
  • cotton roll
  • gauze roll
  • gauze pads
  • self-adhesive bandage e.g. vet wrap
  • splint
  • toenail trimmer
  • blanket
  • cold and hot packs
  • supportive harness or stretcher if you have a large dog
 
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