Dog Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,
I'm new here because I would like some advice on what dog to get. I had dogs growing up but I have never had one as an adult with kids of my own.
When I was young we had what seamed like the perfect dog: Tally an Australian Shepard. She was sweet, wise, quiet, smart, loving, had enough energy to go on walks and play but was mostly docile and just loved to be loved on, she was so eager to please, and seamed to have a sixth sense about people. We did have to groom her when she shed but she was very healthy and well behaved. As you can tell I loved her very much. :)

But we had other Australian Shepards that where much more energetic and hyper. One was very territorial and had a biting problem with strangers. Another was very hyper and never trained well always jumping on people and chewing furniture. My mom was really good a training and trained many dogs, but with the two other Aussies we had, we just had to learn live with their bad behavior.

Even though I love dogs and want one for my kids I haven't gotten one of my own because I thought I could never find another dog like Tally. But then my friend got a Collie and he reminds me so much of Tally. Are the traits that I mentioned above common for Collies or is what I'm looking for a Unicorn? Should I look for a Collie or some other bread? Are there other Aussies out there that are like my Tally or was she an anomaly?

I have a large yard (1/3 acre) and we are an active family that spends a lot of time outside. I think if we got a dog that likes kids and was well behaved they would get a lot of attention. I just don't want a dog that will make it so my kids don't want to be outside. My youngest is 3 and he does not like being jumped on.

Thank you for your help :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Collies generally need a job to do, whether that's actual work or a sport like agility, scenting, obedience, flyball or similar. They are awesome dogs but do need a lot of stimulation. How much time could you devote to keeping a dog occupied? Realistically, if it isn't a lot, a collie might not be the right breed for you.

So, what would a typical day/week look like?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,140 Posts
No matter the breed, if you get a puppy you have to teach them not to jump up. If you were thinking of a Rough Collie (Lassie type) they are not as hyper as the Border collie, and would probably be good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
I think the mistake many people do is to fall in love with an individual, and then wanting that specific breed. One individual will never be able to represent a whole breed. The best way is to read loads about the breed, check the breed standard, contact breeders, meet a lot of dogs of that breed. But dogs will always be individuals and have their own personalities and it’s impossible to truly know how a dog will turn out. That being said, different breeds have different characteristics and are bred for different purposes. Therefore you can often predict if the dog is likely to be more reserved or friendly, high or low energy, loud or quiet, etc. However, if you would only be happy with a very specific type of dog that often is seen as the “perfect, quiet, low maintenance” dog, it’s more of an issue. It’s also important to remember that you don’t get a well behaved dog without putting in the time and effort.

As for the Australian Shepard I would say that the other two dogs sound more like the typical Aussie to me. It’s a very high energy and often hyper breed. A breed that often get problem behaviors when they aren’t being exercised enough. They can be the absolute perfect and most well behaved dogs, but not in every home (as for any breed really).

“sweet, wise, quiet, smart, loving, had enough energy to go on walks and play but was mostly docile and just loved to be loved on, she was so eager to please, and seamed to have a sixth sense about people.”
You can find these traits in many breeds, some more than others. However it depends very much on the situation. You could have a dog that would be the sweetest most loving dog in one home, that would be a complete nightmare in another home. Therefore it’s so important to choose breed after what you’re able to offer the dog. Both Aussies and Collies are very smart and trainable but needs a lot of exercise and a job to do (herding, agility, obedience trail etc). The traits you’re asking for could be common for a well exercised and trained collie but not for an under stimulated, untrained one.

It would be great if you could describe what a normal week would look like for the dog. To get an idea of how much exercise and training the dog would get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you all for you questions and impute.
I am looking for advice on which breed to start looking for what I want in a dog. I know that there are different personality types in each breed. I am looking for advice on wich breeds to start with.

As for time spent, very week is different but usually we spend two to three hours outside. Right now my kids just play with each other mostly but with a dog around I think they would spend more of that time playing catch or something the dog would like. We typically go on walks or bike rides two or three times a week. But that might be more if we had a dog to walk. I am home with kids every day so the dog would have a companion around almost all day every day, except when I go to the store. We go to the park about once a week and could take it with us.

I know that having a new dog would take some time to train to have good behavior. But I'm not looking for a dog that needs to have hours every week devoted to doing obedience training.
I have read up on smooth/rough Collie. And like that they are such good family dogs. I don't really care how it looks, I don't really even mind a mutt. But I know it's easier to find certain traits in different breeds that might be hard to pinpoint in a mutt.
And I am thinking of getting an adult dog for two reasons. First I think it's good to take rescue dogs. And second I'm hoping an adult rescue would have some training already and make my job easier. Win, win. 😀
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Do you usually spend 2-3 hours outside during a week or everyday? When you go on walks, how long do you usually walk? In my opinion I think a dog should be walked everyday (preferably multiple times), just three times a week is often too little for any breed (also depends on other activities and how long the walks are). Would you be prepared to change your usual day and maybe go for a couple of walks everyday instead? From your description it sounds like you’re expecting to get a dog that would fit in your day as it is right now. Is that the case or are you prepared to change your day when getting a dog?

As for your description, even if you would walk the dog everyday, I don’t think that a Collie would be suitable. If you’re able to offer more exercise as in more walks for instance, you definitely have more breeds to choose from but it doesn’t sound like you’re looking for a breed that needs a meaningful job and activity to be happy. More suitable breeds would be Maltese, Poodle, Havanese, Bichon, for example.

As you mention getting an older dog definitely could be the way to go. This would allow you to know the dogs personality and activity level beforehand. What’s risky is that you could get a dog that already have established some problem behaviors, so it’s important to be careful when choosing. But I definitely think this would be the best way to find a dog that would fit your description.

In general I would recommend you to look into dogs bred for companion. I also think a smaller breed would be preferable regarding your kids. A big dog would be more likely to injure them by accident. Just keep in mind to teach the kids not to treat the dog like a toy (even though it may look like one) :)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top