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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My puppy is reaching 17 weeks. He is attending obedience classes every week and I have been training him since I first got him at 8 weeks old. His recall is flawless at the moment as I've made sure that I followed the trainer's instructions. I use open arm gesture and bring my fist in as he is running towards me. I also run backwards so to encourage him to run to me. I call his name first in a happy voice and then say "come" then give him an extra awesome reward at the end such as chicken or a game of tug.

The problem is that I don't want my family to practice the recall right now as I want to proof recalling. I've told them that
1. It is important that he has a reliable recall for his own safety in case he is outside and I need him to come back for his wellbeing. I won't ever trust him off leash if he doesn't have a reliable recall.

2. If he fails to come when the command is given, we are setting him up for failure even if he fails once it is still detrimental. I want to build a history of success and reward particularly with recalling.

I keep on reminding them every day BUT they STILL tell him to "come" ...they kind of just blurt out the word without thinking if they want him to go over to them. He NEVER obeys them. They don't use the hand gesture / body movement like me though. I get so pissed every time they do it and I tell them off straight away but I can't control what comes out of their mouth.

Will this cause my puppy to regress and thus not have a reliable recall? Or will he only obey me if I keep consistent and proof his recall myself? As a side reference, I do all the training, playing, feeding and most of the walking. He obeys my commands but less often listens to my parents or siblings because they can't be bothered with his training. For example, my sister kept on telling him to sit when we were at the store but he ignored her. I came out and made the hand gesture for sit as well as the command "sit" and he sat straight away.
 

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He may learn to obey you, and not them and then you get say "see, I told you so". Or,
You could teach your puppy "come" with a different new word that your family won't use.
You could make part of training a fun game for everyone. One game is to stand in a circle and one at time, family members call the dog by patting their knee, calling it's name, being interesting, then play & treat puppy, and then on to next person.
If you're planning a formal recall for obedience trial, I'd probably find a different word. Trainer's often have two recall words, informal for everyday use, and formal which is a precise return ending with sit facing the handler.
It's always easier to change your own behaviour than someone elses.
Hopefully your trainer has "people smarts" as well as "dog smarts" and can help you get your family involved in a fun way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He may learn to obey you, and not them and then you get say "see, I told you so". Or,
You could teach your puppy "come" with a different new word that your family won't use.
You could make part of training a fun game for everyone. One game is to stand in a circle and one at time, family members call the dog by patting their knee, calling it's name, being interesting, then play & treat puppy, and then on to next person.
If you're planning a formal recall for obedience trial, I'd probably find a different word. Trainer's often have two recall words, informal for everyday use, and formal which is a precise return ending with sit facing the handler.
It's always easier to change your own behaviour than someone elses.
Hopefully your trainer has "people smarts" as well as "dog smarts" and can help you get your family involved in a fun way.
I've tried that but no one wants to get involved because they all use the excuse of "I'm too busy". Altogether, I would say that my parents and siblings spend no more than 5-10 minutes interacting with the dog per day.
I'm sick of pleading and encouraging them so I've just decided to treat the situation as if I'm a single dog owner and take the responsibility including the dog's everyday expenses, vet bills and all its needs.

My family wanted to get a puppy but I guess the initial excitement wore off. I warned them about the time commitment but they did not really understand what is really involved if they want a well behaved dog.
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I'm sick of pleading and encouraging them so I've just decided to treat the situation as if I'm a single dog owner and take the responsibility including the dog's everyday expenses, vet bills and all its needs.

My family wanted to get a puppy but I guess the initial excitement wore off. I warned them about the time commitment but they did not really understand what is really involved if they want a well behaved dog.
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Sounds like you've already made the absolute best decision possible under the circumstances. I think this happens a lot. Just enjoy your dog, come up with alternative words to train with (words your family won't use casually) and have fun with your dog. You will be rewarded by having a great companion.
 

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Just remembered, gosh, my mom was in your position with the family dog (Misha, whom I inherited as an adult).
My mom did all the walks, feeding, training, vetting. She told us not to play chase games or rough play with the dog, and we did it anyway.

The dog turned out just beautiful, she did not try to engage my mom or any other unwilling partner in chase or rough play, but she did provide hours of awesome rough play for those of us who enjoyed it. They do learn that different rules apply with different people. I hope that's a little reassuring that it can work out okay, and that you are not alone.
And again, wow, sorry mom...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does anyone have any advice of a word that can replace "come" that is one syllable and does not sound like anything else? I've thought of "koi" but that sounds like "oi" when I try to get my dog's attention.
 

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Ian Dunbar likes to have three different come commands. This is basically because of this and you don't want to ruin your "come" by using the word when you can't or won't follow through.

You could also encourage them to play recall games with the pup :)
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I wouldn't worry about them telling him to come and here's why. Dogs do not generalize very well, even if your dog obeys your command 100% of the time, there's still a pretty large chance that when another person uses that same command, even does it the same way you do, the dog may not understand that that command means that action when the other person says it. What I'd bet is going to happen is that your pup will learn that come means come when you say it but is meaningless when they say it. Now if your family wants your puppy to start obeying them they are going to have to start participating in her training, then she'll learn that the commands mean the actions no matter which one of y'all say them.

For come you can use a special whistle, or maybe Here, Hurry, or come in a different language.
 
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