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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone,

So I got my new puppy a few weeks ago and now he is 12 weeks old. He is well socialised as i've taken him out everyday and he has been to puppy school. I've also started obedience class with a personal trainer before moving into a group class. You see, the puppy is so damn clever that he already knows how to sit, drop, dance, roll over, shake, hi fi and come. I've been doing these tricks throughout the day to solidify them. I've also started the triangle of temptation for every feeding session on top of teaching him to walk on loose leash. He has been obeying my commands perfectly so far but not so much with my father, mother, sister and brother.

1. My younger siblings are too soft but I guess that is because they are still kids. The issue is that my sister has too much homework commitment and my brother is seriously addicted to his ipad - which means that he spends a lot of time on digital technology. I've lectured and reasoned with both of them about spending more time with the puppy but they seem to always see this as a chore rather than something fun. Ironically, they were the ones who insisted on getting a puppy.

2. My father is pretty inconsistent with training as he'll praise the dog every time even when the dog is not doing anything good. He'll tell the dog to sit and the dog won't sit for him but he won't do anything about it. I've tried to tell him to work with the dog on leash, using a clicker and a treat but he constantly forgets to do so and ends up randomly telling to the dog to do things when he feels like it. The dog ends up not doing it because he is distracted and looking elsewhere. I've resorted to telling my father to avoid giving him commands because I'm afraid that he will set the dog up for failure.

3. My mother is not interested in dog training because she believes that the dog will be obedient once I've trained him. She tells me that it's enough if I train him and she'll just pat or cuddle him. Out of all my family members, I think she is the most disinterested in dog obedience as she just wants a dog that can cuddle with her when she wants to and if she has the time. She literally prioritises her housework over the dog and would insist staying home to cook lunch for us rather than coming to obedience school with me.

Do you guys have inconsistent family members and does this end up ruining dog training or cause behavioural problems? If so, how do you convince, educate and train your own family when this happens?
My puppy has already started showing a disinterest in my family members because when they pat him, he'll run to me if I walk away. I've been telling them that he will end up not listening to them if they don't put in some serious effort but my warning doesn't seem to have much effect.

I spend much of my day taking him out, training, feeding, cuddling and playing with the puppy because the other family members are at school or work aside from my mum. As such, I'm seriously worried that he will end up listening to me but not them - causing even more distance between my family and him.
:(
 

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My family aren't really involved too much in obedience stuff, either. It hasn't really been a problem. Chisum will still do what they ask (because he knows they'll reward him just like I would) though sometimes I do have to remind them if they're using the wrong command and are confused as to why he's not responding, or if they're rewarding when they shouldn't be. Mostly, it's not a huge deal.

What helped a lot was getting them to go to training sessions with me; however, my dog has behavioral problems so those were necessary. But it did help teach them both a little more about positive training (both were more "traditional" before) and I think his progress instilled a bit of pride in them, which made them more excited about engaging with him.

At the end of the day, though, some people just aren't dog people. As long as they aren't actively mean to your dog it's not the end of the world.
 

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My husband goes to training classes with me, but isn't hugely involved with training. I like him to be on the same page as me, so if he does want to help, he knows what to do. Ultimately, I think the dogs will listen to the person who does the most training. Levi listens to Ben 90% of the time, but listens to me closer to 99.9%, even though I reward FAR less often than Ben does. Training will make your bond super strong, so I don't think you have to worry about the dog not listening.

I think in the end, most people aren't that interested in training obedience, most people want a dog that they can play with on their terms. I wish my mother-in-law would leave the training to me, and not help, since she makes it way worse. Your family being disinterested might just be a blessing in disguise.
 
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My parents aren't really involved with training either. Really all they do is pet him/give him attention, and occasionally take him out to play if they feel like it. As for training, ive personally done all his training, and have gone to training classes by myself except for the first one when my mom came with me. They really don't have the initiative to try and train him. But he still listens to them as long as he knows the command and especially if there's a treat offered. He just listens to me much better because my parents (mainly my mom) have no idea how to communicate what they want from him with out using a commanding voice or yelling (which according to her she doesn't do :eyeroll:), or that if he doesn't know a command repeatedly telling him to do it is not going to work.
 

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I think as far as training goes, it's nice to have 1 main person doing most of the training. I found then the dog at least has some stability in it's life.

I do most of the training in my house. My husband know how to get them to do most of the commands and the dogs will listen to him most of the time, but then know that I don't accept some of their more lack luster attempts to get away with stuff.

Dogs are FAR easier to train the family.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay cool so I'll persist with the training and not expect too much from everyone else in the house. It's so sad because they seemed to be committed and as excited as me about getting the dog. In reality though, the excitement for them has gone and now they go about their daily lives without spending much time interacting with him because they think he is "my dog".

I'll enrol him in agility classes when he turns 1 year old but for now, I'll just need to spend more time exercising and interacting with him so he doesn't become bored and destructive. I'm really concerned about next year when I'll start working full time near my house in Feb. I'll be able to be with him from 6-8am then from 4:30-9pm but other than that, my mum needs to take him out around noon time. She doesn't want to spend extra time with the dog because she believes that she has a lot of other things to do during the day and we just had a big argument because she is annoyed at me for spending too much time with the dog even though technically, I'm doing my work on the laptop with the dog next to me. I justified myself by stating that if everyone else in the house was spending enough time with the dog, I wouldn't need to stay outside all the time with him.

It has got to the point that she is frustrated at the dog because he is taking up all my time and regrets for allowing me to bring the dog into our home. The problem is it is her house so her rules but I bought the dog and I'm paying for all his expenses so it's either she accepts him (not forcing her to train him or anything) or I move out (when I can support myself financially).
 

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Our BSDs obeyed me and my mother. My mother, because she trained them in the first place. Me, because I practiced with them when my mother stopped taking them to the agility classes. It was a tough road because I had no guidance.

They did perform basic commands with the rest of the family, at least if they had treats at hand. They never really trained with the dogs. It is easier for the dog to understand a given command if you have trained the dog or practiced with it because you will know how the command should be given. Basic commands were repeated by all of us so often that either the dogs made perfect educated guesses or they learned to recognize these commands even in less clear contexts.

The same goes with routines. They cannot know what routines or manners the dog is used to if they do not work with it but the dog may learn to pick up hints about what to do - or gets it completely wrong and that frustrates the humans because the humans did not do their homework.

My dog only obeys me and people who have treats. One lady wanted to make her lie down at a rally-O trial after our run to make her dog run jealous. She flattened her hand and brought it down to earth flamboyantly in front of my dog - who stared at her dumbfounded and then bowed. I then explained I have dropped such vivid hand signals long ago because she also does traditional obedience. Poor collie could not understand it and the gesture resembled my hand signal for a bow. Alva does know a down by a hand signal but it is just a flat hand moved downwards like 20 cm (8 in).
 
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