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I am at my wits end!! I have a 3 year old fixed male boxer. He is the most hyperactive dog I have ever seen! I am a stay at home wife soon to have a newborn in 6 months and I do not think I can deal with a baby and a dog who acts like a baby. I take him for 5 10 minute walks a day and at least 4 times a week we go to the dog park for over an hour. He has plenty of toys and other things to occupy him. He has been taught all of the basic tricks (sit, down, stay etc) but when we get home from walking or the park he rests for maybe 5 minutes and he is at it again. If i am sitting down he has to be in my lap, pushing on my feet, putting his toys or ball in my lap, if I am sitting and watching TV he lays on top of me and demands to be petted. If I am doing an activity where he is not given attention he barks and whines no training I tried got him to stop doing this! I just do not know what to do any more!! He is constantly nibbling on our hands or feet he used to "play bite" but I trained that out of him but he will not stop putting his drooly mouth all over us until we play with him or pet him. I love him to death and can not stand to give him up I am just not sure what else can cause this hyperactivity he snit bored or under exercised by any means! HELP!!
 

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Boxers are very active dogs. And I don't think that taking him out 5 times for 10 minutes a day is tiring him out physically. You don't say how often you take him to the dog park. Anyway, dogs parks will probably only get him even more excited, and it seems to me that he has not been taught to relax, to be on his own.

Increase walks to at least 1 hour per day not in 10 minute slots, then feed him from food dispensing toys such as Dog Pyramid, Kong toys, - you can google food dispensing toys for more ideas. That will make him work for his food and occupy him for a while.

Do some training with him - simple things like stay, or tricks such as rollover, hi five, plenty of videos online.

Teach him that he will be ignored/separated from you if he mouths your hands, barks or whines. You have a lot to teach your dog in a short period of time. Patience, consistency and determination needed if you want him to become a pleasant companion for all the family.
 

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Our dog is extremely active as well (it's entirely possible she's a boxer mix) and one thing we found helped was giving her more challenging physical & mental tasks.

Taking her to the dog park never really cut it because she didn't move around all that much or would just stand around looking at squirrels. We'd stay for an hour then leave and she'd still be sooooo wound up. So, now we take her to an off leash area where we can throw sticks for her to retrieve and get her to jump up on brick walls, run up and down stairs, play hide and seek with her, etc. I think it also makes her really happy that we're playing and interacting with her. I think boxers really like to bond with their humans so it will probably really help your pup too.

We also still do regular walks with her and I almost think it's those brisk 1 hour walks that tire her out more than anything. We keep a good pace and in the winter, we'll even give her a backback with some cans of food in it to give her a little extra workout. You can look online or talk to your vet about how much weight is safe for your dog to carry. I think the general rule is about 20% of body weight but work up to it over time, especially if they're still growing.

Also, find games at home that you can play to exercise your dog's mind rather than being super wound up and physical. My favourite is "Find it" where I make Yoki wait in one room while I hide a treat in a nearby room. Then, I call "Find It" and she has to go looking/smelling for the treat. At first she was really confused so I had to lead her to the treat a few times saying "Find It" then cheering when we got to the treat before she eventually figured it out on her own. After a few rounds, she can be a little excited but eventually calms down. I think it's surprisingly exhausting for her to use her brain that much!

Again, I think the great thing about those kinds of games are that your dog gets to play with YOU and I'm pretty sure a boxer would appreciate that.

Hope you find some of this helpful!
 

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I agree that the pup needs more exercise, more stimulation and more play with you. On the converse side, the dog also needs to learn to be alone.

So, up your walks. Up your play time. You can incorporate games into your play - fetch, find it, etc. Look into stimulating/puzzle toys. We have the Kong Wobbler and will probably be getting another similar toy soon.

Then, after play, create a place where your dog goes to rest. For us, with the puppy, it is an exercise pen with a bed in it. For the older dog, he has a mat that he knows is his space. After tiring the dog out, put it in the pen. If it doesn't nap right away, give it a puzzle toy or something to chew. Make the pen his happy space. Give him treats in there. Leave treats lying around in there. Praise him when he is in there. Ignore him when he barks or whines. If you can't stop the barking, I suggest you look into teaching him "speak" and then "shhh" as a way to control the barking.

Also, if you play/pet whenever he puts his mouth on you or solicits attention, you are reinforcing that when he does those things, they work.

If you really are at your wits end, I would suggest hiring a positive reinforcement dog trainer for some one on one session in your home. The trainer will be able to guide you through challenges you face in your home and give you tips for bringing home baby with a dog.
 

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I don't know how much time you were expecting to put in when you adopted a high-energy dog but I'd say about 1-2 hours of off-leash running/play per day is typically how much they need. Even my 11-year-old pomeranian goes stir-crazy if he gets less than an hour in long, brisk walks per day.

With this in mind, you might do well to consider hiring a dog walker, or sending your dog to a daycare. It's certainly pricier than exercising the dog yourself, but in some circumstances it may be the only feasible option, especially with a baby on the way.
 

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I also second the dog walker or doggy day care options if you can afford them. Even for 1-2 days a week. Seeing how different your dog is when he is well exercised and stimulated will show you he *can* be a good boy. And it gives you a mental break. I work from home but send my pup to doggy day care once a week so she gets socialized and I get a break. As a perk, she's tired for a lot of the next day as well!
 

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What do you feed? Sometimes the food has things in it that can cause hyperactivity.
I also agree that longer walks will help instead of many short one. If you can't do it hire a dog walker to make sure he gets enough physical exercise and training in 5 minute sessions throughout the day also will help tire him.
 
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