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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had multiple dogs over the years, and never had one who liked to bark during times when they are excited... until now. Oakley has been with me about two months, (and is almost 8 months old) and though he rarely barks at other times, he has suddenly started barking during play - it can happen when I am teaching him a new skill or when he is trying to get Cache to play with him. While I am thrilled that he is so happy he wants to tell the world about it, the 'world' may not appreciate hearing what he has to say.
I don't want to dampen his enthusiasm for learning or play by 'correcting' the barking, but I don't want the barking to become a regular 'thing' either.
Would like to hear how others may have dealt with 'over arousal' - 'excitement' barking.
What worked for you?
 

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The only thing I can think of is to teach barking on cue - Kikopup has a video - because then you stop on cue too. Make a game of it, teach him to bark for a subtle hand signal so you can make it look like he is counting or answering arithmetic questions (what's 10 ÷ 5, cue him a 2)
 

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Two things that might also help (though JoanneF's is my preferred method) are teaching a highly rewarded alternative and/or maybe a modulation. For example, he can bark but if he gives a playbow, he gets a treat or game while a bark gets nothing. The second is he still barks, but you clicker capture a "softer" bark (or a different sound) and cue it. High reward, nada for big/loud barks.
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of Aussies! :LOL: :ROFLMAO: :LOL:
Barking is what they do and what they enjoy. For many barking is hard wired into their brains.
Aussies herd just for the fun of it; when many get the herd where they are supposed to be; some will stir them up all over again just for fun..

Apparently Oakley is showing off his Aussie side.
 

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Teaching your dog to bark then the quiet command is the best thing in my opinion. Where we lived before jesse wasnt allowed to bark or he got abused
(not by me) so i taught him to bark and quiet and he learned very quickly play ended if he started barking.

Jesse barks like crazy now😅
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of Aussies! :LOL: :ROFLMAO: :LOL:
Barking is what they do and what they enjoy. For many barking is hard wired into their brains.
Aussies herd just for the fun of it; when many get the herd where they are supposed to be; some will stir them up all over again just for fun..

Apparently Oakley is showing off his Aussie side.
Your absolutley right some dogs are so geneticly wired they have no control over it😆
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Apparently Oakley is showing off his Aussie side.
I am sure his 'Aussie side' is going to teach me a few things and keep me 'busy' for a while to come!!
But he is truly a wonderful soul, and pretty mellow most of the time, a real sweetheart!
 

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I am sure his 'Aussie side' is going to teach me a few things and keep me 'busy' for a while to come!!
But he is truly a wonderful soul, and pretty mellow most of the time, a real sweetheart!
Out of curiosity are aussies the same as bcs in personality?
 

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@Beardogjesse
Having been the owner of both breeds, generally there is a fair bit of overlap-with individual differences understood- but aussies are a bit more opinionated, less drivey-intensive, and generally less "soft." They are also generally more guardy than bcs, more prone to barking, but generally don't need to be actively taught to settle inside the home. though this is mostly working lines, and a few show that I've interacted with, I hear sport lines are a different story.
As for why aussies and not American shepherds, breed lore is that their founding stock were mostly a mix of working dogs (some of which were also imports) that came to the US with Australian sheep imports and some ranchers on ships, then mixed with some California working dogs before becoming a focused breed and continuing development. Perfect answer, no, but that's the story as I know it.
 

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@Beardogjesse
Having been the owner of both breeds, generally there is a fair bit of overlap-with individual differences understood- but aussies are a bit more opinionated, less drivey-intensive, and generally less "soft." They are also generally more guardy than bcs, more prone to barking, but generally don't need to be actively taught to settle inside the home. though this is mostly working lines, and a few show that I've interacted with, I hear sport lines are a different story.
As for why aussies and not American shepherds, breed lore is that their founding stock were mostly a mix of working dogs (some of which were also imports) that came to the US with Australian sheep imports and some ranchers on ships, then mixed with some California working dogs before becoming a focused breed and continuing development. Perfect answer, no, but that's the story as I know it.
Thats interesting thanks for explaining.
Ive only ever spoken to one aussie owner although theres quite aussies around me and she said she had an aussie before her bc and said it was on a wholenother level of intelligence compared to here border.
 

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Thats interesting thanks for explaining.
Ive only ever spoken to one aussie owner although theres quite aussies around me and she said she had an aussie before her bc and said it was on a wholenother level of intelligence compared to here border.
Quite a few i meant to write.
I type way to fast and my phone has trouble catching up with me. I notice i miss so many words on my posts due to this
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Out of curiosity are aussies the same as bcs in personality?
To be fair, I am still getting to know 'who' Oakley is, but have noticed a few of the differences that Shadowfox has described when compared to the other border collies and mixes I have had the pleasure of traveling their life's journey with. Every dog I have had has taught me something new, and I expect Oakley is no different, life is a 'learning curve' for all of us!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In thinking about it, I do get a sense that Oakley's barking may be driven, at least in part, by 'frustration', especially when directed at Cache (who doesn't always grant his wish to be played with), and the more Cache turns away and ignores him, ( 'Not now!' signals that Oakley has yet to figure out and to 'listen' to) the more he barks.

An Expert Reveals What "Frustration Barking" Is and How To STOP It (iheartdogs.com)
 

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My pup sometimes barks when he plays. Not at other dogs, but when wanting to chase something such as my shovel, water hose output, rake or a toy he's really excited about. I think my dogs have always barked in exitement, so it just might be certain breeds (especially high prey driven ones that love to chase things).
 

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I have known people who got great results with a dog who barked during play (or some other thing, like agility runs) by training the dog a "whisper" cue. The dog then does a tiny little soft sound instead of a bark. Train this as if it were a trick or behavior, (capturing it works, and you can also train it by making the sound yourself and sometimes the dog will reply in kind) and then cue it when the dog starts barking.
Not only does it work, but it is a great show-off (and we all like that kind of thing every now and then...) when the dog barks and you say "whisper" and the dog changes to a tiny little woof. !
 
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