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My precious 2 yr old St/Great Pyr fur baby was just dx'ed with idiopathic epilepsy, (cluster seizures) 6 months ago. (we ran all the tests except MRI which Neuro Vet thot not needed and all good) She is currently on Keppra and low dose pheno. Question: We live in New England and just experienced ticks on her first time ever this past week. As we live in a condo, she walks leashed, not in woods or trails. She has not been on any tick/flea preventatives except when 6 months old and had a severe aggressive reaction to Seresto Collar. Called Neuro Vet yesterday as well as regular vet and no answers as to what to use that is safe for my epileptic dog. Pls help me with advice, knowledge and recommendations. Most Sincerely and Thank You in advance.
 

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I also have a dog with seizures, but he is not on any meds yet as he doesn't have cluster seizures. I, personally would be very careful about the flea/tick stuff. He's probably already not feeling too good with the seizure meds. I have quit using Febreeze, and only clean with vinegar and water. We know aspirin triggers the seizures so we quit that, and he has been 13 weeks seizure free. I wouldn't do anything that might cause an episode. But that's just me. Can't stand watching him go through that and wouldn't risk anything that might trigger it.
 

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According to the manufacturer's website, the Seresto collar uses two chemicals:
"Seresto® contains two active ingredients: imidacloprid which kills adult fleas, flea larvae and lice – and flumethrin, which repels and kills adult ticks, larvae and nymphs."

I would keep off all chemicals if I were you. Ticks can be removed manually by applying strong alcohol to the head of the tick, waiting a few minutes, then turning the tick around gently using a special tool which you buy in most pet shops. Do not try to pull it out, as you risk leaving the tick's lower parts still inside the dog's skin. Gentle turning, until the tick's legs are loosened, and then (and only then) a very gentle pull should deal with it. If you are not confident that you can do it, then a vet can do it for you.

As for preventing your dog getting ticks, you could try neem oil. This is a natural plant extract, not a chemical. Its smell (actually quite pleasant) repels ticks, so they don't attach in the first place. It can be bought in most pet shops. It is sometimes called margosa, but it the same plant.

My very best wishes for your dog's recovery!
 

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Hope the meds prevent further seizures. I'd wait to hear back from your vet(s) about flea & tick produces. Even so-called natural products aren't without risk.
 
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