Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I've researched the two breeds for several months and have learned everything I can.

We move into a dog friendly apt in may. We have a pet rabbit.

Info to help you answer my question:

-2 adults with FT jobs. I work nights and am off for a whole week every other week. He works evenings 5 days a week. (So someone is almost always home)
-we live where there's plenty of nature and room for exercise ...plenty places to take walks, mountains for hikes, lake, river, "beaches"
-plenty places downtown to dine outside with dog (I'd like a dog who would like to venture around town with me in thr car and eating out etc)
-would like to take dog on OCCASIONAL LOW KEY hikes ...I know neither are active dogs who would sustain long hard hikes
-we also do plenty of couch lounging and movie watching and would love a dog who likes to cuddle and just chill around the house!

And just how much DOES feeding an Englishmastiff cost ?

Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
My honest opinion? English mastiff.

English bulldogs at this point are almost nothing but cash cows. It's hard to find a breeder that is ethical and is actually trying to improve the health of the breed. Most of the time they are bred purely for the cash because each puppy can sell for $2k. More if they are a special or rare color. They are health disasters and suffer from so many chronic diseases and disorders from poor breeding that I couldn't, in good conscience, recommend anybody get one.

If you're interested in a similar but healthier breed, check into olde english bulldogges. Yes, it is a different breed. They have more of a snout and there are many reputable breeders out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
My honest opinion? English mastiff.

English bulldogs at this point are almost nothing but cash cows. It's hard to find a breeder that is ethical and is actually trying to improve the health of the breed. Most of the time they are bred purely for the cash because each puppy can sell for $2k. More if they are a special or rare color. They are health disasters and suffer from so many chronic diseases and disorders from poor breeding that I couldn't, in good conscience, recommend anybody get one.

If you're interested in a similar but healthier breed, check into olde english bulldogges. Yes, it is a different breed. They have more of a snout and there are many reputable breeders out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your opinion!! Have you ever heard of beabulls? (Beagle/bulldog mix) supposedly, if you get a pup who is 75% or more bulldog and less beagle, you essentially get a bulldog in terms of looks and overall temperament, but cancel out most of the health problems of bulldogs due to the beagle aspect. I did alot of research on those too...but it's proven hard to find what seems like a reputable breeder, as most I've come across seem more like puppy Mills...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
Thanks for your opinion!! Have you ever heard of beabulls? (Beagle/bulldog mix) supposedly, if you get a pup who is 75% or more bulldog and less beagle, you essentially get a bulldog in terms of looks and overall temperament, but cancel out most of the health problems of bulldogs due to the beagle aspect. I did alot of research on those too...but it's proven hard to find what seems like a reputable breeder, as most I've come across seem more like puppy Mills...
That's unfortunately the trend with a lot of mixes like that or designer breeds. They're bred more for the cute name and the money, since labradoodles and other doodles and poos will sell for $500-$2000.

There are ethical breeders that outcross...Basically introducing a similar, over all healthier breed into their line to widen the gene pool. The best example I can think of are with dalmations. There are people that have bred English pointer into their dal lines, then back crossed those with dalmations. I honestly do think it's what likely needs to happen with the English Bulldog if anybody wants to save the breed and fix it.

Just be careful. It sounds like you are really doing your research, which is great. If you do try to find a breeder that is outcrossing, make sure that they health test. Outcrossing can help reduce a lot of genetic diseases that are the result of a limited gene pool. But they don't eliminate a lot of congenital diseases like hip displaysia, epilepsy, skin sensitivities, elbow displaysia, etc. Outcrossing has to be done pretty carefully with a lot of screening and testing. You don't want to breed two dogs with hip displaysia together no matter what the breed is. And if you breed a breed prone to mast cell tumors with another breed that is prone to mast cell tumors, you're not really doing either breed a favor lol.

If you'd like, I can PM you some links to groups on Facebook that might have some resources for you or people that can point you in the right direction if you are interested in breeders that outcross.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sure! I'd appreciate that! I've found a couple breeders of beabulls, and while they say they supply a health certificate, the way they go about just shipping off the pups without really inquiring anything about the prospective owner is kind of sketch ...not so much the shipping part - I know everyone has varying opinions....while I don't really want a breeder grilling me up and down, it's good to at least see a little concern for where the pups are going.

I'm leaning more toward an English mastiff so far though! Only thing that stinks is how much they cost!! (Actually, bulldogs and beabulls too).

The breeder I'm currently looking at for mastiffs sells pups for between $2000 to $3000. I've been aware of their cost for awhile having researched, but say you found a breeder offering them for less...is thst a bad sign? Is $2000 a marked up price or overall typical? From what I've read so far it's typical I think ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
I would definitely go with the Mastiff. Bulldogs have way too many health issues. They can't do very much in comparison to what they were originally used for which is quite sad. You can find nice tempered Mastiffs in rescue if cost is an issue. If not, I don't have any further insight as I am not well versed in breeders and where to find a reputable one. Good luck with your search and post lots of pics when you get your dog. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm almost certain I will go with a mastiff! I found a breeder (who I actually eyed months ago) right here close to my current work who has a litter on the way that'll be ready to go the first week in may after we're in our new apartment! Good chance I'll prob plan on getting one :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Thanks for your opinion!! Have you ever heard of beabulls? (Beagle/bulldog mix) supposedly, if you get a pup who is 75% or more bulldog and less beagle, you essentially get a bulldog in terms of looks and overall temperament, but cancel out most of the health problems of bulldogs due to the beagle aspect. I did alot of research on those too...but it's proven hard to find what seems like a reputable breeder, as most I've come across seem more like puppy Mills...
Really? My understanding of crossing 2 breeds you will get some offspring that will be like the english bulldog, some like the beagle and some somewhere in between? And that will go for the offspring of these crosses. Or have I got it wrong?

I'd go for the mastiff any day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
Sure! I'd appreciate that! I've found a couple breeders of beabulls, and while they say they supply a health certificate, the way they go about just shipping off the pups without really inquiring anything about the prospective owner is kind of sketch ...not so much the shipping part - I know everyone has varying opinions....while I don't really want a breeder grilling me up and down, it's good to at least see a little concern for where the pups are going.

I'm leaning more toward an English mastiff so far though! Only thing that stinks is how much they cost!! (Actually, bulldogs and beabulls too).

The breeder I'm currently looking at for mastiffs sells pups for between $2000 to $3000. I've been aware of their cost for awhile having researched, but say you found a breeder offering them for less...is thst a bad sign? Is $2000 a marked up price or overall typical? From what I've read so far it's typical I think ...
That sounds like a normal price for that breed. Offering for less....Idk. You just have to look into it. Some breeders have different philosophies about puppy cost. My breed is the border collie. It's pretty normal for a lot of bigger sport breeders to charge up to $2000 for their dogs, all health tested for HD, CEA, etc. But, I've also encountered some working breeders who do all the same health tests that ask under $1000 because they simply don't believe a good dog should cost somebody a fortune.

So talk to them. Make sure they're doing the health testing. ESPECIALLY hip displaysia. You want OFA graded hips on parents. If they offer you a note from the vet saying the parents are healthy or hips are normal, not good enough! It MUST be either OFA or PennHip. It might help to ask about the eyes too. English Mastiffs are prone to a lot of genetic eye issues like entropion and cherry eye.

The parent breed club website is often a great resource for finding reputable breeders and what health tests you should be seeing done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In reference to my comment on beabulls: yes, I believe a beabull shares traits from both breeds....what I meant was that beabulls who are greater percentage bulldog basically look like a bulldog over a beagle if the wrinkly bulldog look is what you like... where others who don't know what their looking for don't even notice the beagle physical attributes.

As long as the landlord "ok"s a giant breed I'm prob going for the mastiff though!

Know what's funny? My rabbit actually makes way more of a mess than a dog could ...haha....hopefully raising mastiff pup with a bunny will go well! Based on research they're pretty docile, and my rabbit isn't afraid of cats or dogs himself ...which is strange haha but good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sure! I'd appreciate that! I've found a couple breeders of beabulls, and while they say they supply a health certificate, the way they go about just shipping off the pups without really inquiring anything about the prospective owner is kind of sketch ...not so much the shipping part - I know everyone has varying opinions....while I don't really want a breeder grilling me up and down, it's good to at least see a little concern for where the pups are going.

I'm leaning more toward an English mastiff so far though! Only thing that stinks is how much they cost!! (Actually, bulldogs and beabulls too).

The breeder I'm currently looking at for mastiffs sells pups for between $2000 to $3000. I've been aware of their cost for awhile having researched, but say you found a breeder offering them for less...is thst a bad sign? Is $2000 a marked up price or overall typical? From what I've read so far it's typical I think ...
That sounds like a normal price for that breed. Offering for less....Idk. You just have to look into it. Some breeders have different philosophies about puppy cost. My breed is the border collie. It's pretty normal for a lot of bigger sport breeders to charge up to $2000 for their dogs, all health tested for HD, CEA, etc. But, I've also encountered some working breeders who do all the same health tests that ask under $1000 because they simply don't believe a good dog should cost somebody a fortune.

So talk to them. Make sure they're doing the health testing. ESPECIALLY hip displaysia. You want OFA graded hips on parents. If they offer you a note from the vet saying the parents are healthy or hips are normal, not good enough! It MUST be either OFA or PennHip. It might help to ask about the eyes too. English Mastiffs are prone to a lot of genetic eye issues like entropion and cherry eye.

The parent breed club website is often a great resource for finding reputable breeders and what health tests you should be seeing done.
And thanks! I didn't know the specific health clearings to ask about. Must have missed that in my extensive research (haha ive been obsessed with researching for so long now!) Only knew it's good to see a health certificate and view the parent dogs. I'll make sure to check out this breeder fully!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
Thanks for your opinion!! Have you ever heard of beabulls? (Beagle/bulldog mix) supposedly, if you get a pup who is 75% or more bulldog and less beagle, you essentially get a bulldog in terms of looks and overall temperament, but cancel out most of the health problems of bulldogs due to the beagle aspect. I did alot of research on those too...but it's proven hard to find what seems like a reputable breeder, as most I've come across seem more like puppy Mills...
That's because nothing but mills and backyard breeders ever breed a dog like that. They're mutts with a high price tag and completely unpredictable look, health, and temperament. Do not waste your money on a mill bred mutt. If you want a bulldog mix with a longer snout, look in rescues for one. Or like someone else said look into the Olde English Bulldog. Don't be scammed into believing you're purchasing a puppy that's in any way more special than an average mutt, and very possibly still has some bad health issues.

I would definitely go for English Mastiff but I'm interested as to why you picked these two breeds at all. Is it just their looks appeal to you or what?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Not solely looks. Mainly for their temperament..... looks are a plus. I get my pup in May, put down a deposit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,643 Posts
congrats. :)
have fun with your pup.
makew sure to not over feed it and keep be careful with overexercising your puppy until it is around 3.
make also sure to keep an eye on the way he walks. if you notice he walks funny and there could be something wrong with the bones, better bring it to vet too often than miss a treatable bone damage.
large breeds often come with ED or HD, but al ot of the dogs can lead totally normal lifes when it's noticed early.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top