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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

We need help!

Our English bulldog went to the ER vet because he was balding in different spots. He has also had a history of chronic ear infections. This isn’t the first time the bald spots have happened but this has been the worst. In the past the vet would give him antibiotics and send him home.

This time we got an environmental allergy test done and it was negative. Skin scrape also negative. So vet said it might be food allergies so she prescribed Hills Z/D and prednisone. Haven’t seen much improvement yet.

In the mean time what can I do for these spots?? I’ve seen post about using coconut oil and selson blue shampoo. Any other suggestions? The first picture below you’ll see the flakes and also notice that his fur is about to come out.

I’m also thinking that since the hills food has chicken in it (which I think is the culprit) so I’m thinking of switching to Natural Balance Bison or Venison.
 

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Wow that looks pretty bad. Most dogs that I've seen come in looking like that end up being diagnosed with a fungal skin infection, which is often secondary to a larger underlying health issue. Most fungal skin issues are easy to diagnose, so I would hope your vet and/or emergency vet has already considered and ruled it out but it may be worth asking them about it. Sometimes vets can get tunnel vision and forget about the less common causes for similar health issues. If he hasn't had a full blood work up then I would start there. A skin cytology or culture may also be something worth considering.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Yes, the vet did a skin scrape and that was negative. Is that what you are referring to? We also did environmental allergy testing. She did offer a full blood work up which we declined but I think it’s time to take that next step. Thanks for your reply.
 

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A skin scrape is only used to check for mites not for fungus, bacteria, or any other skin issue. A cytology would be used to check for bacteria. A skin culture is used to grow out any bacteria that may be present. And a woods lamps test, which is basically examining the skin with a black light, is useful for identifying fungus. Since all you need for a woods lamp test is a black light, it's a very easy and cheap test to do, though you can get false negatives if it happens to be a fungus that isn't highly reactive to the black light.
 
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