Dog Forum banner

121 - 137 of 137 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Annageckos, it wasn't a 'confrontation'. It was a request - the OP even said the neighbour was polite.

As for law, that will depend on the town/country. Here if you have a dog in a front, unfenced yard, you need to have it leashed. If my neighbour had a high prey-drive dog loose in the front yard, I'd be concerned when taking my leashed dog outside, and wouldn't let her run in my yard in case the other dog's instincts kicked in. It only takes a moment, and the result is a dead dog (or two). Not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
But in the initial confrontation the dog was not unleashed out front. If a new neighbor moved in and came over to my dog was always locked up I'm be put off too. People around leave their dogs unleashed on their own property, and it's legal. Also some people have e fences, I don't like them but they are there. You don't like a breed don't move in next door to one.
Your property or not, most US towns have leash laws....I don't think I've ever lived in a place that wasn't extremely rural that allowed for unleashed, untethered dogs even on your own property. Mostly because in the US the first 5-12 feet from the curb, sidewalk, or road is considered right of egress for the public, which in many neighborhoods comes quite near the house itself.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
295 Posts
I can understand you with this, and I can see why you would think that way, telling the truth right now though may be a little more difficult than before if we add in the fact that the OP has already hidden the body of the dead cat for some time, and it may complicate the apology if you say the fact that you've hidden the remains of the cat in your garage, so if this was the case for you what would you do?
I'd be honest about that too. I'd say that when I found the cat, I felt terrible about what had happened, but I also worried about what might happen to my dog as a result of the attack. I'd say I was afraid to tell them, and the longer I waited the more awkward and difficult the idea of telling them became. I'd take full responsibility for concealing the fate of the cat, apologize profusely, and offer to do anything I possibly could to help ease the tragic situation.

The neighbors might appreciate the honesty and by more sympathetic, or they might go into a raging fit and scream at the OP. There's no way to know. They might be very upset and let the OP know that, and they might never want anything to do with her again. Or they might be very forgiving, understanding people who will not hold it against the OP that she made a sketchy decision when faced with the risk of losing her dog. They might say ugly things about the dog and the OP right to her face. Who knows? There's nothing the OP can do about how her neighbors might react.

When I was a kid and used to tell lies to try and keep myself out of trouble, it ate at me and made me miserable. I hate lying and hate being lied to. So maybe that's another reason I'm so extreme on this issue. It just seems that telling the truth, while it might be the harder thing at the time, usually winds up being the better solution in the long run.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
295 Posts
You don't like a breed don't move in next door to one.
That's not very realistic. A lot goes into choosing a home for a family. A certain breed of dog living next door would be a very small issue, and should be NO issue at all so long as the dog is being properly managed. Having it loose in the front yard is not appropriate in a neighborhood setting, I don't care WHAT breed it is. Forget the risk to neighborhood kids or pets. When we were kids, my cousin's Golden Retriever was off-leash (she actually got loose from her pen) in our neighborhood. She took off after the neighbor's cat and ran into the street chasing it. She got hit by a car and killed. In that one incident the dog could have harmed the cat, did harm/kill itself, and at the very least probably caused some emotional harm to the poor person that hit the dog.

So the neighbor's request for the dog to be leashed when out of the fenced yard was not nearly as outrageous as people have made out. It would actually be better for the DOG as well as others around it.

But I see from the OP's reply that the lie was told and, imagine that, it was found out. So another lie was told to try and cover up the truth.

I'd imagine the neighbors aren't stupid and know what happened. Only time will tell whether they're vengeful people or whether they'll simply do the right thing. It's too bad the OP and her husband didn't do the right thing. Not only have they lied (twice) to their neighbors, they've taught their son that lying is preferable to telling the truth if you think you'll get into trouble. Great job there.

I feel sorry for the poor neighbors. They have EVERY RIGHT to be VERY upset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
The moral of the story; either tell the truth in the first place, or if you're gonna lie, go all the way. But either way your kid will screw it up in the end.

btw I think being 'concerned' about a teenage boy bragging about his dog killing things is a bit silly, that's what teenage boys do. Especially suggesting they rehome the dog cause of that, come on now.

wait here's a better moral; don't leave your dog outside unsupervised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
The moral of the story; either tell the truth in the first place, or if you're gonna lie, go all the way. But either way your kid will screw it up in the end.

btw I think being 'concerned' about a teenage boy bragging about his dog killing things is a bit silly, that's what teenage boys do. Especially suggesting they rehome the dog cause of that, come on now.

wait here's a better moral; don't leave your dog outside unsupervised.
Bragging about a dog killing a wild animal? That's within the range of normal. Heck, my brother tired to eat a mouse and has eaten rabbit that he's hunted and was very proud of it. I have 3 brothers and tons of male cousins

Bragging about a dog killing your neighbor's pet cat? I think that goes into creepy territory. I would not feel comfortable owning an animal if a member of my household thought it was worth bragging about that said animal killed someone's precious pet. Even my most manly-man say-things-for-shock-value brother never would of dreamed of enjoying a pet (or even a feral cat) being killed, even as a teen. Maybe all the guys I know are just decent human beings.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
295 Posts
I teach high school, so I'm around hundreds of teenage boys a day. I don't find it at all odd or alarming that the OP's son was bragging about his dog killing the cat. Heck, I've heard boys bragging of killing cats themselves. Not that I think it's a GOOD thing, but it's just not that uncommon or unusual for a teenage boy to tell his friends about his dog killing a cat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,182 Posts
I teach high school, so I'm around hundreds of teenage boys a day. I don't find it at all odd or alarming that the OP's son was bragging about his dog killing the cat. Heck, I've heard boys bragging of killing cats themselves. Not that I think it's a GOOD thing, but it's just not that uncommon or unusual for a teenage boy to tell his friends about his dog killing a cat.
May not be surprising, but I find it troubling. I do not believe, and certainly hope it is not the norm of todays kids, certainly was not when I was a teen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Annageckos, it wasn't a 'confrontation'. It was a request - the OP even said the neighbour was polite.
To me that is a confrontation. To you it may not be. Someone assuming your dog is aggressive given the breed, it doesn't sit right with me and it isn't a way to make good with new neighbors IMO. I would never dream of moving into a new home and going over to people I don't know and 'request' they keep their dog leashed and/or in the yard. Not all dogs of a breed will have high prey drive or other breed traits. My GSD didn't have a high prey drive, I let her and my boys in the yard without a leash. I know them and what they do. I know them better than some person who just moved in and never even met the dog/s. Now don't take that as me saying that all dogs or even this dog should be outside without a lead. I don't know the dog or the people to say that. I do think the new neighbor should have gotten to know them and the dog before telling them what to do. Agree or disagree, this is how I feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Your property or not, most US towns have leash laws....I don't think I've ever lived in a place that wasn't extremely rural that allowed for unleashed, untethered dogs even on your own property. Mostly because in the US the first 5-12 feet from the curb, sidewalk, or road is considered right of egress for the public, which in many neighborhoods comes quite near the house itself.
I'm not rural, but not in the city either. I've check the law here, and dogs do not need to leashed on their own property, they do need to be under control. That includes voice control. A lot of people around here let their dogs loose in the unfenced yard. The dog behind us is outside most of the day when his people are home. No tether, no e fence. He never leaves the property. The people next to me also let their dogs out unleashed, though they don't listen well. I'm not going to argue about it, like it or not that is the way it is around here. There are not dogs running the streets, most are well behaved. Not all, but most.

I understand not everyone thinks the same. I was giving my opinion. Of my guys only Freyja has anything close to a prey drive. And I wouldn't even call it that. The boys don't care, and Vegas would run away from a cat before ever dreaming of chasing one. But that really doesn't matter. Different people do things differently and see things differently. I wouldn't tell a neighbor what to do with their kids, especially if I just moved in and didn't even know them and I expect the same of someone else with my dogs. Now, I'm not reading anymore on this post. It's causing my anxiety to skyrocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Cynna said:
Annageckos, it wasn't a 'confrontation'. It was a request - the OP even said the neighbour was polite.
To me that is a confrontation. To you it may not be. Someone assuming your dog is aggressive given the breed, it doesn't sit right with me and it isn't a way to make good with new neighbors IMO. I would never dream of moving into a new home and going over to people I don't know and 'request' they keep their dog leashed and/or in the yard. Not all dogs of a breed will have high prey drive or other breed traits. My GSD didn't have a high prey drive, I let her and my boys in the yard without a leash.
If I left my high-preydrive species dog unleashed and loose in the front yard, I'd much rather a neighbour come over and ask if I'd be able to leash it, than just have them call the SPCA or municipal police department. Friendly neighbour relations are a good thing.

If a neighbour politely speaking to you with a good-neighbourhood request is something you see as 'confrontational', you might want to reexamine how you interact with your neighbours (and I mean this in a positive way).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I'm sorry but I think it's kinda silly to expect people who don't own dogs, aren't interested in dogs, and have learned very little about dogs to look at big strong breeds like GSD's and pitbulls unleashed and uncontained and NOT be a tad concerned. Of course they will be. Not everyone sees dogs as cute "furbabies" nor should we expect them to or judge them harshly if they don't. Keep your dogs behind a fence, on a leash, or otherwise CONTAINED, period, it doesn't matter how saintly and amazing your dog is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I'm sorry but I think it's kinda silly to expect people who don't own dogs, aren't interested in dogs, and have learned very little about dogs to look at big strong breeds like GSD's and pitbulls unleashed and uncontained and NOT be a tad concerned. Of course they will be. Not everyone sees dogs as cute "furbabies" nor should we expect them to or judge them harshly if they don't. Keep your dogs behind a fence, on a leash, or otherwise CONTAINED, period, it doesn't matter how saintly and amazing your dog is.
Some people who know dogs very, very well may be concerned too--my mom, who knows dogs very well, was pretty clear to me that if I own a breed with a strong prey drive, no matter how disinterested my dog is in prey...

One day that dog just decide: "Today is the day I honor my ancestors!"

I've noticed that stories of this type usually include the dog making a break for traffic, too, so...

Long story short? If Oakley--who is a puggle who has a lot of beagle behaviors--is out in the open and not hunting, she's going to be on a leash. I care about her enough to not do to her the equivalent of expecting a toddler, left unsupervised with candy they're not supposed to eat, to never eat it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Just because you have a leash on too doesn't mean you have to use it. I made Zico his own long line for schutzhund, he goes out on that. He just drags it behind him. It's so long he can be a really decent distance from me and if anything happened I still have the end of the leash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I'm sorry but I think it's kinda silly to expect people who don't own dogs, aren't interested in dogs, and have learned very little about dogs to look at big strong breeds like GSD's and pitbulls unleashed and uncontained and NOT be a tad concerned. Of course they will be. Not everyone sees dogs as cute "furbabies" nor should we expect them to or judge them harshly if they don't. Keep your dogs behind a fence, on a leash, or otherwise CONTAINED, period, it doesn't matter how saintly and amazing your dog is.
I DO own dogs and have owned quite a few breeds and unknown, unleashed dogs still make me nervous when I have small children around me. Children are unpredictable critters as is, and their natural clumziness and high-pitched squeals often perk the prey drive in dogs....as another poster stated, you never know when even the best trained dogs will hear the call of the wild. And while 99.999% of dogs who do initially mistake a child for a rodent stop themselves, it can be terrifying to the parent and child none the less.

Granted, I come from an area where it is a given that you don't do off-leash around children. Our fenced in dog park bans children under 9 from entering (children under 5 for the small dog portion) and in the sound (near the ocean beach) where dogs are allowed it the rule that there must be a parent/guardian for each child under 12 and children are not to approach unknown dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I DO own dogs and have owned quite a few breeds and unknown, unleashed dogs still make me nervous when I have small children around me. Children are unpredictable critters as is, and their natural clumziness and high-pitched squeals often perk the prey drive in dogs....as another poster stated, you never know when even the best trained dogs will hear the call of the wild. And while 99.999% of dogs who do initially mistake a child for a rodent stop themselves, it can be terrifying to the parent and child none the less.

Granted, I come from an area where it is a given that you don't do off-leash around children. Our fenced in dog park bans children under 9 from entering (children under 5 for the small dog portion) and in the sound (near the ocean beach) where dogs are allowed it the rule that there must be a parent/guardian for each child under 12 and children are not to approach unknown dogs.
I will qualify that as it pays to know the dog and the child if you're going to do off-leash around children--my mother was perfectly fine letting me be happily herded by the neighbor's equally happy Aussie in an enclosed yard. She knew the Aussie would herd me, and had made sure I knew how to behave around dogs and cats from a very early age. It certainly worked to keep both of us from getting into mischief...

On the other hand, I've run across some kids where... Well, I don't know them well enough to be certain, but I wouldn't be surprised if about the only thing that's left is to hope getting older will get them better able to have good manners with pets.

So, while you may know your dog (normally) loves children, they might know their child thinks dogs' tails are handles for pulling as hard as possible & can pull surprisingly hard...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
As someone who owns a 'Pit bull'(A staffordshire terrier) I have to say that yes, i would tell the owner if my dog killed their cat that got into my yard. I also let Blarney out front multiple times a day loose as the backyard has 60 chickens in it that my neighbors own(I live in a duplex) and i know she'd go after their chickens. However both her and Liam could care less about people walking down the street, or the dogs across the road or even next door. Both have good recall, and Blarney loves humans. Luckily my neighbors across from us and also beside them and even beside me in the duplex all own 'Pit bulls' so there is no 'Can you leash your dog'

HOWEVER If i had a cat and it went missing and one of their dogs killed it, i'd wanna know. While he seems to be biased, i'd explain that dogs are naturally predators of cats, and that the cat came in your backyard. I've had cats get in my backyard before, and even rescued a few from our dogs still half alive. I've actually walked one cat back to its house with it barely alive and told the owners what happened and offered to pay for the vet bills. They said there was no need, that she was an outside cat and our chow wasn't at fault.

You never know he might be understanding?
 
121 - 137 of 137 Posts
Top