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I do feel awful - they have put up fliers looking for the cat and obviously their kids are upset. Please help! I can't stand the idea of Boomer being taken or killed, but I want to do the right thing. What's done is done though, right?
If you want to keep any kind of neighbor relations I would dispose of the cat humanly and keep your mouth shut. This neighbor is not going to accept the responsibility for the cat getting out. He will blame your dog even though it happened in your yard. They may very well retaliate by doing something to your dog. You need to keep your dog safe. I would not leave the dog in the yard unsupervised for a while.
 

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I would assume that Mark's initial concerns stemmed from all of the media reports he had seen of pit bull's attacking children and of his desire to keep his children safe. For folks on a dog forum, maybe that seems irrational or outlandish, but for someone who's not a dog person, he comes across to me as a really protective dad. And, at this point, he's a dad with a missing cat, which we all know is a multilated cat with a broken neck in the OP' s garage.

I have some sympathy for Mark. I think that labeling him as "irrational" or "biased" has become an easy way to shift the attention away from the lie that he will now be told about his cat.

Maybe the OP should keep the secret if that will keep Boomer safe. He was acting in line with his natural prey drive in the confines of his enclosed space the same way the neighbor's cay might have once killed a mouse or small bird. It was an accident. I understand that.

However, morally speaking, a lie is a lie. Mark has asked the OP about the missing cat, and if she doesn't come forward with the truth now, she is lying. Let's not justify the lie by calling Mark "irrational" or "biased."
 

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id probably tell them the cat is dead, but go with a road accident, because of how the people feel about the dog. its a lie, yes, but at least it will stop them wondering what happened to it, and it wont give the dog a reputation it dosnt deserve.

in a way the incident is a tragic accident really. and yes, dont leave the dog out, when your not home.
 

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But the neighbor was biased against the dog because he is a pit, no other reason(from the info we got). There are people biased against my girl for no other reason than she is big. They think because she is big she is aggressive. They, like this neighbor are choosing to be ignorant and not learning things for themselves. The new neighbor could have talked to them and asked about the dog instead of just assuming the dog is aggressive because it's a pit.

I do think the people need to know the cat is dead, but I don't think they need to know it was mauled by the dog. Blame it on a auto accident, wildlife. Leave an anonymous note one night, say you found it's body. Do whatever you feel comfortable with.
 

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So, their love for their cat is less than your love for your dog?? This is what it sounds like reading these posts. Imagine for a moment if you will, that your dog went missing, you would be worried sick, forever wondering what horrible fate had befallen of him. When all the time your neighbour knew he was dead & didn't tell you!! I'm afraid you are going to have to take the flak, the worst thing that will happen is you may have to agree to the authorities to keep your dog on a lead or muzzled when out & about. However, I believe when the dog is in his own yard then the rules are different, the cat sadly strayed onto your property with dire consequences. My daughters cat went missing for 5 days once, the worst thing was the not knowing, believe me it's the most horrid feeling ever, thankfully she came home, but I know my daughter would have rather known if she was dead. Do the right thing, please.
 

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Am I reading correctly. You said that Boomer was in the yard when you were not home? It was a terrible thing that happened. However leaving Boomer in the yard for a couple of hours unsupervised is not a good idea. Protect him and others by only allowing him out when you are home.
^This^
My previous dog, Dynamo, had high prey drive. Left to her own devices, she would have killed neighbourhood cats. It is indeed natural behaviour. That's what training, fencing, and supervision is for.
Knowing the possibilities, I never left her out unsupervised, and I trained a solid recall so that if a cat got into our yard I could call her off.
Legally, I know nothing. Morally, you have a responsibility to ensure this does not happen again. Now that you know what Boomer is capable of, his future actions belong to you. It's not okay to let your dog kill cats. You have some work to do.
 

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The thing that I find problematic about the neighbor, is not that he is biased against pitbulls, but that he seems to think he has the right to question someone else about their dog and control what the dog does on private property. This man seems to not be fond of dogs in the first place, doesn't have a reasonable understanding of boundaries, and is unwilling to form a relationship with you or the dog. These traits would make me unwilling to tell the neighbor that I suspected my dog has killed the cat.. But you certainly do need to tell him. I would advocate for telling them that you have found the cat but make no hints as to what you think happened. It seems as though he would make it clear if he believed your dog had something to do with it, in which case you can take steps to protect him.
 

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I agree with JudyG. The family needs to know that their cat has died. It's not fair to them to let the family continue to search and worry about their pet. The whole "bury the cat and pretend that nothing happened" slant of this thread concerns me.

I don't think that Mark was at all irrational for being upset that the dog was off leash in the unfenced front yard. I'm not willing to bet that the dog's recall was 100%. With its high prey drive, Boomer could have easily run off in pursuit of the neighbor's cat that day.

Brushing off the neighbor's concerns does not make one a good ambassador for the breed.
 

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And again, yep. Off leash in the front yard was justification for concern. When I walk a leashed dog, that's another serious concern. Very few dogs have the training and recall to be reliable under all circumstances. I'm feeling very very very sorry for the neighbour, the kids, the poor dead cat, and if the op does not change their behaviour, future cats.
I keep my own cats indoors, my new pup is being supervised and trained to be peaceful (umbilical cord, lots of treats) but that doesn't mean that I care less about other folks beloved cats.
 

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Personally with one of my dogs a "pit bull" I never allow her off leash unless we are training(or in a secure area) and I know her focus is 110% on me and nothing else otherwise she's on a long line. I love her and she's an amazing dog, but accidents happen and whether or not it's her fault she'll more than likely take the blame for any incident that were to occur... I'm always concerened when I see a dog loose in the yard(whether or not hte owner is present) especially owning reactive dogs and the fact that majority of the dogs we've happened across the owners have zero control over and we always end up getting harassed which sucks so makes me very weary around loose dogs.

Anyway the incident that happened as sad as it is was completely preventable and just one of the many dangers of allowing your cat to roam outdoors. Mine have all been raised with cats and are cat friendly, but I wouldn't be surprised if a stray/loose cat wandered into the yard while they were outside they wouldn't hesitate to dispatch it. I mean a dog's a dog....

Personally I would probably tell them I mean how would you feel if something happened to one of your animals and you never knew? If they bring up the issue of dangerous dog try explaining small animal aggression/dog aggression does not equal human aggression. I don't think there's much they could do considering they let their cat roam and the cat happened to come onto your property. It's was all just a tragic accident and accidents do happen...
 

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Well first your neighbour is not being irrational or biased by having concerns about your dog, and especially it being off-leash on your driveway. He is being a concerned parent. It would be perfectly NORMAL for him and his family to completely flip their lid and try to have your dog removed from the neighbourhood when they find out what it did to their cat. What you do about it is up to your conscience. But either way, you need to respect your neighbour a little more and keep the dog on leash whenever it is not in your back yard.

If it were me, no I wouldn't tell them, I'd dump the body somewhere as others had suggested and have a neighbour brake the news that their cat has been found, or leave it on the side of a nearby road. Do not expect your neighbours to forgive and forget if you tell them. And they have every right not to, being nervous of pitbulls and other powerfull breeds does not make people irrational and biased. It's up to the people who owns them to BE RESPECTFUL OF OTHERS and realize not everyone sees dogs as cute furry babies but potentially dangerous predators. I like pitbulls but I don't care if your dog is a therapy worker who saved orphans from a fire, put it on a leash when you are off your own property, cause they scare people, and you cant blame them.
 

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Horrible accident for all involved. However you should tell the owners. This is why: my daughter came to stay with us for a visit with her newly adopted dog setter mix. He had some issues and caused some problems with my dog. I didn't trust him because of some of his behaviors. I had at the time one adult dog and 4 indoor cats. Of couse the cats had no fear of dogs because they lived with them. We kept my daughter's dog separated from the cats and supervised interactions with our dog. I went to work the one day and told my daughter that if she left the house to crate her dog for safety purposes. She did not do as I instructed but, instead locked the dog in the bedroom. I came home from work called the cats to feed them. One cat Tara did not come. I went upstairs found the dog loose in the bedroom, put him in the crate and continued to look for Tara. Apparently she had slipped into the room where my daughter's dog was unnoticed. I found her dead in the closet in that room trapped and killed by my daughter's dog. Who's fault was it? My daughter's for not crating her dog. I cannot tell you the devastation I felt that day. We make choices in our lives. Those choices can effect outcomes. Thinking of others and making a responsible choice for all involved Is part of being a good pet owner. Please tell your neighbors, what if the tables were turned?
 

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I would not tell them. Here is why:
My dogs are more important to me then any other animal. By telling your neighbour, you might be putting your dog at being euthanized or poisoned by your neighbor. I would not risk my dogs life like that.

Honestly, I think this is your fault (not your dogs) and your neighbors fault. Your pet should not be left outside on it's own. Dogs should always be supervised and under leash or voice control when outdoors. It is extremely irresponsible to just let your dog out like that. He could have been stolen (think bait dog), escaped the yard, or killed in some manner.
It is also your neighbors fault because he let his cat escape.
I hope you learned something from this. Keep your dog under control at all times, especially since it's a dog with high prey drive.
 

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I don't understand why so many of you are saying Mark was being unreasonable about wanting a dog leashed when not fenced inn. Have none of you been attacked by, or had your pets attacked by unleashed dogs? Have none of you heard that postmen get attacked by dogs all the time? This man had children.

Saying that cats die all the time as an argument for not telling them is also insane to me.
 

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I don't understand why so many of you are saying Mark was being unreasonable about wanting a dog leashed when not fenced inn. Have none of you been attacked by, or had your pets attacked by unleashed dogs? Have none of you heard that postmen get attacked by dogs all the time? This man had children.

Saying that cats die all the time as an argument for not telling them is also insane to me.
I don't think it was because of the dog being unleashed but the first part where as soon as he moved in he came over with concern about the dog and it being a pit. That was before he even had seen the dog unleashed.

To quote the OP:
the husband (we can call him Mark) came over and told us that he was concerned for his family living next door to a "pit bull."
It is kindof weird that a neighbor would do that. And like someone else said, if their dog was not a pit would he have done it? I doubt it... So he had already shown concern and bias towards the breed.

I think that part is what makes people doubt he will handle it well....
 

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definitely need to tell them that you know that the cat is dead, Im unsure whether its necessary to tell them that it was your dog who did it.
 
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