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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's looking like I will be inheriting my brother's corgi! I am unbelievably excited. He has issues, but I am confident I can work with this dog.

Here's the background. My brother and his wife about a year ago brought home a corgi puppy. He is from a reputable breeder that I actually found, and he was their first dog. I had talked to them about the needs of corgis (as well as how wonderful they are) and made clear that they weren't a couch potato. They are smart, reasonably energetic, and need an active life. He assured me that they knew this and were prepared to put in the exercise and training a corgi would need to be a happy dog. As you can imagine, this hasn't happened.

This dog, albeit ill-mannered and incompletely housebroken is amazing. When I met him, I can honestly say I hadn't met a dog or corgi like him before or since. He is smart, very people-oriented, and clearly would thrive with a "job". I wanted him instantly! Aside from training hints (all positive with an emphasis on providing this dog structure, expectations, and maybe even a job), I have made it clear that I'd take him on in a heartbeat if need be.

My brother, though he could deal with this dog forever, recognizes that he and his wife are not the best fit. They wanted a sweet little lap dog (which they now have in a 6 month old dachshund. I would have told them to wait on getting another dog, but they didn't consult). They aren't really providing him exercise like he needs and are having difficulties with him behaviorally. My brother describes him as a Jekyll and Hyde dog: he will be very sweet and then snap at you. I have tried on numerous occasions to give them PR+ training advice but I get the sense they aren't really using it. And *shudder* they have used some dominance training techniques. None of this is helping this dog, obviously. They really are just ill-equipped for this dog.

I, however, am quite confident in my abilities with this dog, and my ability to balance him in my life. I can 100% guarantee his snapping (and yes, some biting) is due to my brother not listening to warning signals and thus the dog got conditioned to reacting that way because it worked. It isn't set in stone yet, but when I visit them this Christmas I should be returning with the pup! I am incredibly excited and can't wait to get my hands on him. He will be treated to long walks, snuffling, dog parks (as he isn't dog aggressive as far as I know), and lots of obedience training. In the summer we may be doing agility (if stumpy is up for it :p). I was pretty convinced I'd be unable to get a corgi because they are impossible to find in rescues where I live, but it looks like I will be after all! Needless to say though I have a lot of reading to do on dog training.

And because he was the cutest pup, here he was at 8 weeks:

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He was (and still is!) precious. I love corgis for that corgi personality. They are utter goofs. They also have the smarts without being too intensely a herder.
 

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hes lucky to have another more appropriate home :)

what methods are you planning to use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Training? All positive reinforcements. I am personally a fan of the "nothing in life is free" idea as well. Basically, he will have to work for things he wants. Like before I feed him (probably in a puzzle toy) I will make him sit first. I know kikopup has some great videos as well. I am a grad student in clinical psychology so I am pretty familiar with things like BAT, PR, counter-conditiong etc. No punishment, just reinforcement of what behaviors I want and ignoring those behaviors I don't want. Training dogs and behavior modification for people are quite similar!

Edit: I should add he is very food motivated (what corgi isn't?). This should make things easier.
 
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