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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my dogs died a few months ago, and the other dog that grew up with it is now pouting a lot and seems lonely. So we have been waiting for the right time to come to get our other dog a companion.

We were recently pointed to two doodles that were being rehomed. They were so cute, but went together as two. They were being removed because they dug a hole in the backyard and, well you know the drill, the owners were done with the dogs. 馃槬
The dogs are two yrs old, are of healthy stature and are very loving towards other family members, we are told. I was kinda thinking about adopting the two, but my sis, who is a vet, has told us about how bad doodles are, genetically. What do you think? Any advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What sort of doodles?

I wouldn't touch a cavalier x poodle because of the cavalier problems but unless anyone knows better (which wouldn't be very hard, I'm no expert) I don't think labradoodles or cockapoos are at any more risk than labs, cockers or poodles from non-health tested parents. Of which there are many; but that's a whole other box of badgers ...
They are Irish doodles. Sorry, I forgot to put that in the original post!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So an Irish terrier X poodle?

They are likely to be quite 'drivey' with terrier tenacity. Irish terriers are fairly high up the terrier scale, if you count things like West Highland terriers as low and Lakeland and Patterdales as quite high (i.e. bred over millennia to relentlessly hunt and kill small furry things very efficiently).

If they are a bonded pair, be very aware of littermate syndrome - where they are more engaged and focussed on each other than on their people. Unless they have been trained to do things separately, which seems unlikely from what you said earlier, they may be a real handful at best; and unable to function separately at worst.

Another thought. Are they being disposed of because they have been able to practise their behaviour for so long that they are now really skilled at naughtiness?

It's a tough one, it depends so much on how much energy you have for them. From the very limited information, I don't think they will be easy. If you really just want company for your other dog, I'd probably say no. If you want a project, and if you have the time, energy, skill and inclination - fasten your seatbelt, it could be a fun ride!
Irish Setter 脳 poodle
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So an Irish terrier X poodle?

They are likely to be quite 'drivey' with terrier tenacity. Irish terriers are fairly high up the terrier scale, if you count things like West Highland terriers as low and Lakeland and Patterdales as quite high (i.e. bred over millennia to relentlessly hunt and kill small furry things very efficiently).

If they are a bonded pair, be very aware of littermate syndrome - where they are more engaged and focussed on each other than on their people. Unless they have been trained to do things separately, which seems unlikely from what you said earlier, they may be a real handful at best; and unable to function separately at worst.

Another thought. Are they being disposed of because they have been able to practise their behaviour for so long that they are now really skilled at naughtiness?

It's a tough one, it depends so much on how much energy you have for them. From the very limited information, I don't think they will be easy. If you really just want company for your other dog, I'd probably say no. If you want a project, and if you have the time, energy, skill and inclination - fasten your seatbelt, it could be a fun ride!
If they were Irish Terrier of ANY kind I would have passed right over them lol!
 
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