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So I've had my 7 year-old Golden Retriever for about a year now. She is very gentle and has always been playful and kind to ALL dogs. The other day we rescued a Collie mix who we found on the street. She was in desperate need of help, so we didn't have enough time to introduce the two (which I know is incorrect, but the rescue HAD to come home with us immediately). However, they were both kept separate. (Golden in the house and Collie in the Garden). The Collie is also kind, but of course, needs some time to adjust to her new surroundings. We went to take the two for a walk, so they could get to know eachother outside the house, but as the Golden walked past the Collie (from pretty far away) she ran towards her and bit her REALLY hard. We were very surprised! Our Golden Retriever is now TERRIFIED and can not even go into the garden anymore. What can I do? I wanted them to learn to be friends and live in the house together, but our Collie is showing extreme signs of aggression to the Golden, who seems to be doing nothing wrong. Please help!! :(
 

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I would always be there when these two are together. Bring them together for just a very short time, and do not tolerate the collie's aggression toward the golden.
If you are unable to control them, then you might think of giving up the collie. Much as you don't want to have to do that.
 

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Bring them both to a new place. So they dont own any part of it. Such as your golden who right now owns the house and the collie who owns the yard. Take them to a park. Have one family member have your collie sitting and bring the golden up from around 20 or more feet away. See what she does. does she look? or stand? If she shows any sort of bad behavior jump in front of her and push her back. Get into her space. then Sit again and repeat. You will need to repeat this while getting closer and closer. We are seeing if she does not understand what she being asked to do or if she is just afraid of other dogs.
 

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Seek help from a professional. ASAP. Look in the behavior and training stickies for how to find the right person.

It may be that you can not keep this new dog. Your resident dog should come first. I understand the desire to help a dog in need of a home but not if it means the resident dog or dogs have to live in fear. Some dogs have behavior problems beyond what the average dog owner is willing or able to deal with.

I'd keep these dogs completely separated until you get a professional consultation.
 

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Bring them both to a new place. So they dont own any part of it. Such as your golden who right now owns the house and the collie who owns the yard. Take them to a park. Have one family member have your collie sitting and bring the golden up from around 20 or more feet away. See what she does. does she look? or stand? If she shows any sort of bad behavior jump in front of her and push her back. Get into her space. then Sit again and repeat. You will need to repeat this while getting closer and closer. We are seeing if she does not understand what she being asked to do or if she is just afraid of other dogs.
I'm sorry to be so blunt but this is not good advice. No part of this should be followed unless you want to create a bigger problem than already exists. Getting into a dog's space, pushing a dog back and repeating this at closer and closer distances will not do anything but make this worse.

No professional would ever set up this sort of scenario.
 

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I would always be there when these two are together. Bring them together for just a very short time, and do not tolerate the collie's aggression toward the golden.
If you are unable to control them, then you might think of giving up the collie. Much as you don't want to have to do that.
This sounds as though you are recommending some sort of punishment for the aggressive behavior. Aggression is usually fear based. It's not a matter of an owner showing a dog the behavior won't be tolerated. Aggression is usually distance increasing behavior. The dog is trying to keep the other dog away because it's fearful.

The above quoted advice is not something any qualified professional would recommend.

To the OP. Get help from a professional. This is beyond the scope of internet advice and you could have some even more serious problems if you don't get the right help.
 

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This sounds as though you are recommending some sort of punishment for the aggressive behavior. Aggression is usually fear based. It's not a matter of an owner showing a dog the behavior won't be tolerated. Aggression is usually distance increasing behavior. The dog is trying to keep the other dog away because it's fearful.

The above quoted advice is not something any qualified professional would recommend.

To the OP. Get help from a professional. This is beyond the scope of internet advice and you could have some even more serious problems if you don't get the right help.
First off, I do not pretend to be either "Qualified," or a "Professional." That being said, just what do you consider "punishment" vs "redirecting?"

You don't have to "punish" because you don't tolerate something, you use affirmative redirection.
 

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@GoldiesPa, point taken. It is possible to teach a positive interrupter as you suggest. That can be a good cue to have available. It does not do anything to change the underlying reason for the behavior.

If I tell you, hypothetically, that I won't tolerate your behavior, does that give you the impression that there will be consequences that you won't like, if you continue the behavior? That was how I interpreted the word, when you used it in your suggestion.
 

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I'm going to have to be the one to pop in and ask... You found the Collie on the street the other day and intend to keep her as your own?

It's actually illegal to keep a stray dog without attempting to find its owners. Even if the dog was a legitimate stray with no owner, by law the person who finds the dog does not automatically get to keep it. Check on your area's laws on the holding period for stray dogs, after that time is up you will be allowed to adopt/keep it. However, don't spend that time twiddling your thumbs. Be honest and actually attempt to find the owner.

If you haven't already (considering it's only been a couple days):
1. Take the dog to a vet and have it scanned for a microchip. If a microchip is found, you may not keep the dog (obviously). If one is not present, ask if the vet has received any calls about a missing dog.

2. Call Animal Services and any rescues/shelters in the area and ask if they have received any missing dog reports that match the description of the dog you found. They will likely ask you to bring the dog in for the holding period. If they do, it is legally required that you comply.

3. Post online ads in your area or flyers about the found dog. It is always good not to include a picture or identifying information, perhaps other than breed and sex. Simply include the location at which the dog was found and contact information. If and when people call, they must make a positive ID over the phone. If the dog has any particular special marking or a scar, etc. the person must be able to know that without you hinting at it other than, "How can I confirm the dog is yours? What does your dog look like?"

If nobody calls and the holding period runs out, then you can keep the dog and work out its problems with biting your Golden.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm going to have to be the one to pop in and ask... You found the Collie on the street the other day and intend to keep her as your own?

It's actually illegal to keep a stray dog without attempting to find its owners. Even if the dog was a legitimate stray with no owner, by law the person who finds the dog does not automatically get to keep it. Check on your area's laws on the holding period for stray dogs, after that time is up you will be allowed to adopt/keep it. However, don't spend that time twiddling your thumbs. Be honest and actually attempt to find the owner.

If you haven't already (considering it's only been a couple days):
1. Take the dog to a vet and have it scanned for a microchip. If a microchip is found, you may not keep the dog (obviously). If one is not present, ask if the vet has received any calls about a missing dog.

2. Call Animal Services and any rescues/shelters in the area and ask if they have received any missing dog reports that match the description of the dog you found. They will likely ask you to bring the dog in for the holding period. If they do, it is legally required that you comply.

3. Post online ads in your area or flyers about the found dog. It is always good not to include a picture or identifying information, perhaps other than breed and sex. Simply include the location at which the dog was found and contact information. If and when people call, they must make a positive ID over the phone. If the dog has any particular special marking or a scar, etc. the person must be able to know that without you hinting at it other than, "How can I confirm the dog is yours? What does your dog look like?"

If nobody calls and the holding period runs out, then you can keep the dog and work out its problems with biting your Golden.
We did take her to the vet and had her scanned. There was no microchip, and no collar. We have done all of the above - I reassure you that we are very careful and do not intend to break the law! But thank you for your concern! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would always be there when these two are together. Bring them together for just a very short time, and do not tolerate the collie's aggression toward the golden.
If you are unable to control them, then you might think of giving up the collie. Much as you don't want to have to do that.
Thank you! :)
 

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That's good.

However, a holding period is always more than a few days to give the owner time to locate their dog. Differs from place to olace. Some areas require up to 30 days. Just something to be absolutely sure on since you don't want to be out with her someday soon and have the owner recognize her....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update

So they are seeming to get along much better now. Only when my golden gets very excited does the Collie seem worried, but we have not had any biting or growling. Our Golden also seems more confident. I am hoping that they will slowly become accustomed to eachother - we will definitely contact a professional if we feel we cannot handle them.
Thank you so much to everyone who replied!!!
:D
 
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