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I have searched the entire forum but can't find anyone else with demodectic mange issues. Has this been discussed here and I just can't find it?

Looking for successful non-toxic home remedies. Inka has it near her mouth so I don't want to use any topical that is harmful. Goodwinol ointment worked ok in the past. Really don't want to give those high amounts of ivermectin that are required. Ugh.
 

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this is a natural choice. I have used it for many things over the years.
Skin Disorders
Hydrated clay works wonders for many different skin ailments of animals including mange, cuts, abrasions, rashes and hot spots. Made into a poultice and applied directly to the skin, the clay acts as an analgesic, and quickly reduces pain and itching. It speeds the healing process by pulling out bacteria that can cause infection or rash. It reduces the chance of scar tissue development. In addition, if the animal licks off the clay, it is non-toxic and perfectly safe!
https://earthslivingclay.com/1702/heal-your-pet-naturally-with-calcium-bentonite-clay/
 

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Ted's Dog Mange Cure - Treatment for Demodectic and Sarcoptic Mange

I had read about this and passed it on to an acquaintance. She opted for drugs, which never cured the poor dog. If you try this, the borax used is NOT the borax from the grocery store. Mountain Rose Herbs sells borax.

Also, try giving the dog a tablespoon of organic coconut oil everyday and put 1/4 teaspoon of Braggs vinegar into his drinking water. You may want to consider a grain-free food in case it's a grain allergy that's causing it.
 

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WEll, good luck with that… might work somewhat against sarcoptic mange, which is far easier mange to get rid of (but also a lot less common). There are basically two forms of demodectic mange- juvenile onset, and adult onset. The former is pretty easy to manage most of the time (not all the time). If just a few patches of hair loss here and there, Goodwinol ointment may work well… but most cases of juvenile onset demodex are self limiting… meaning, even if you did nothing, it usually goes away. This natural process may be behind these weird (and completely useless) concoctions and recipes for ridding dogs of these mites.

Demodex historically has been a very difficult mite to treat, and adult onset demodex often ended up in severe adult dog illnesses (and occasionally death) just some 50 years ago or more… no matter what in-effective treatments were used back then. But now we have a lot more effective and relatively safe products (though they still are somewhat toxic, and if used carelessly can cause some serious side effects). Instead of avoiding products like Ivermectin, milbemycin or Mitaban and wasting your time trying to control demodex with other more 'non-toxic' products, I would follow your veterinarian's instructions closely and try hard not to let the mites get the upper hand (or you may regret it). Note that Ivermectin, if used properly (and your dog is not one of the few breeds exceptionally sensitive to this drug), is pretty safe and has been a lifesaver when it comes to this troublesome parasite. Milbemycin works pretty well, too, but is WAY more expensive. Mitaban tends to work OK, but I have had multiple failures with this dip (not to mention the somewhat hazardous toxic exposure to clients with this product). A new flea and tick product, Bravecto, has shown some promising effectiveness against this mite, and it is way less time consuming to use (just every other month treatment).
 

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Demodex is immune related. The mites are normally found on all dogs, they're very common, but the immune system helps to control their populations on the body. When the immune system is repressed, the mites can get out of control, and thats when you see the bald patches show up, the itchiness, skin lesions, secondary skin infections etc.

That being said, it's obvious that the most important thing you can do to combat demodex is boosting the dog's immune system.

Can you tell us a bit more about Inka? What kind of dog, how old? Is she primarily indoors or out? Do you have any behavioral issues with her? Is she on any medications? What do you feed her? Whens the last time she's had a full blood work up and examination? You also mentioned that the mange is coming back...Is Goodwinol ointment the only thing you've tried?

The key to boosting the immune system is reducing stress, resolving any other health issues that might be present, and maintaining a good diet. It certainly wouldn't hurt to try the clay. I've also heard of people treating mange by rubbing DE into the dog's skin in the affected areas. DE or Diatomaceous Earth is also non toxic and edible, so there's no harm if the dog consume some. Just make sure you get food grade DE, and not the stuff that's used for pools and yards. You can also get some supplements to add to her diet to help boost the immune system. Fermented items are good for this because of all the probiotics. You can try apple cider vinegar in her water. Make sure you get the kind that has "the mother" in it.
 

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Rico had this when he was around 6 months old. We were told he'd probably have recurring issues, but it's a year later and so far he's been clear. I have him on a high quality fish supplement and it seems to have helped for preventing it. I was told sulfur helps too, but I didn't use that as we went with Ivermectin since it was all over his body. (Nutramax Welactin -
)
 

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Tigger bounce is correct that this is an immune problem, and in an ideal world, we could simply improve your pet's immune system. Sadly this is not a very realistic approach and little can be done to 'boost' a dog's immune system to any degree that will actually cure or even help control most immune-related illnesses. (been tried for many many decades with very little success). But of course it never hurts to try. There are hundreds if immune-related diseases in dogs and few I know of respond to therapy directed at improving the immune system (immunodeficiencies tend to be genetic and beyond today's science for being 'fixable'… perhaps in the near future, though).
 
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