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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can a strong breed like a rottie or gsd hold itself against raccoons, I do believe their vicious critters and I heard cats usually steer clear of them but we all know that dogs love to take things head on. I might have watched too many movies but it always seems like it's the dog who give the ***** a run for their money but I have seen some ***** that look as big as a beagle and my biggest fear is rabies, it drives me crazy to think about that horrible virus.

Has anyone on here ever had a raccoon problem or had dogs who was attacked by one and again can the breeds I mentioned above hold themselves against one?
 

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You don't want to let your dog near a raccoon. They are vicious and can kill even some large dogs. There's only a few types of coonhounds that know how to take them down. They require a specific way of killing, and most dogs don't know how. As far as rabies, as long as your dog is utd on rabies it shouldn't be a problem.
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Hm. We had a "pet" raccoon that we fed w the barn cats every day and could pet while she was eating, she would never fight w the dogs or cats. She was scared of the dogs and while she would growl and hiss at the cats if they got too close while she was eating I was never aware of her actually fighting w them. I'm sure our one cat could've taken her no problem, he actually made it back to the house after a fight w a coyote, though it was too late to save him and he had to be euthanized due to his injuries(he had been gone 2 days and the tissue around the significant wounds had gone necrotic, nothing we could do at that point). He was one tough cookie though. Certainly not all raccoons are as biddable as our Veronica was, but I would think a large dog would be quite a match for one, as long as it wasn't protecting babies, but even then I think a large dog would come out on top. JMO
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Wanted to edit, but too much time had elapsed -- we have very occasionally (like every few years if that) let our dogs (25lbs, 53lbs, and past dogs of 45lbs and 75lbs) loose on raccoons that have gotten into our warehouse and refused to leave in an effort to get them out. It has worked sometimes, w never any fighting in the slightest between beasts. The '***** are quite scared and often look for the nearest exit, though sometimes they just find something to hide under. I don't think they're generally as aggressive as people assume. I've never run into a truly aggressive one, and I've run into a lot.
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Unless the Racoon is very sick it will run from a dog and do everything it can to get away. Racoons are nocturnal and are usually asleep during the day so if you are seeing one out while it's daylight it's likely very sick, and you do not want your dog anywhere near the '****. They not only carry rabies, but also distemper and mange, along with a few other transmittable parasites.

For 10 years I and my dogs lived way out in the country where there were racoons and only saw them a handful of times. Like most other wild animals they run when they see dogs, I highly doubt that you or your dogs are going to see any unless you are going on a '**** hunt and your dogs are trained to track them, or the '***** are sick.

If, for some reason, your dogs do manage to corner a racoon then yes, you are likely going to have a dog with some wounds that need vet attention, you'll also want to get the dog to the vet just in case the '**** was sick.
 

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Coonhounds tree *****. They're scent hounds and bay when the prey is treed. They aren't supposed to fight them and most don't.

I'd not count on any dog to come out uninjured in a fight with a full grown ****.
 

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Wanted to edit, but too much time had elapsed -- we have very occasionally (like every few years if that) let our dogs (25lbs, 53lbs, and past dogs of 40lbs and 75lbs) loose on raccoons that have gotten into our warehouse and refused to leave in an effort to get them out. It has worked sometimes, w never any fighting in the slightest between beasts. The '***** are quite scared and often look for the nearest exit, though sometimes they just find something to hide under. I don't think they're generally as aggressive as people assume. I've never run into a truly aggressive one, and I've run into a lot.
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As far as I know '*****, like domestic cats, are prey animals and it would be foolish if they went around attacking other animals. Yes they can fight, but they usually only do so as a last resort.
 

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Oh yeah, I'm not saying a **** will go out of its way to fight, but if a dog goes after it they definitely will.

There's an older ******* that lives near me, and he has quite a few hunting dogs. He has 2 coonhounds that can grab a **** and break their neck before the **** can get to them. Where as his other dogs don't know to do that.

I live on a farm, and the ***** just stay far from my dogs.
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I'm pretty sure that if it came to a fight a rottwiler could probably handle a raccoon. The problem is with rabies. Vaccinate your dogs!
 

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I know someone whose toy poodle treed two full grown raccoons--and this was a dog who seemed terrified of air before they moved to an acreage, and it found its courage in the country.
 

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***** can and do come out in broad daylight or dawn/dusk, especially if they're hungry, the weather's good, or there's easy food nearby. They're not as fond of the daytime but they're nothing if not clever little adapters and if daytime is better to get x thing they want they'll definitely be out during the day. A daytime raccoon is not necessarily a sick or unhealthy one!

Your best protection against raccoons is a rabies vaccination and keeping an eye on your dogs. If you have *****, you probably also have possums and foxes, all of which can carry it. Better safe than sorry! We have a CONSTANT raccoon problem here, but none of the raccoons have ever bothered the dogs and waddle away when barked at. We call animal control/pest control, they catch one.. more come back.
 

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Can a strong breed like a rottie or gsd hold itself against raccoons, I do believe their vicious critters and I heard cats usually steer clear of them but we all know that dogs love to take things head on. I might have watched too many movies but it always seems like it's the dog who give the ***** a run for their money but I have seen some ***** that look as big as a beagle and my biggest fear is rabies, it drives me crazy to think about that horrible virus.

Has anyone on here ever had a raccoon problem or had dogs who was attacked by one and again can the breeds I mentioned above hold themselves against one?
Their defense will not matter if they get bitten, they will get rabies. Please vaccinate your dogs.
 

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The largest wild racoon ever killed was 60 lbs. Most raccoons are 20lbs, with big ones at 30lbs. With both claws and teeth, racoons are probably pound for pound tougher than a dog. As said though unless it's sick a raccoon is going to run from a dog...unless it gets cornered.

Coonhounds don't have a special **** killing technique. They chase it unit it's treed then bay. Occasionally they'll get ahold of a raccoon (tries to jump from tree to tree and instead falls) and the pack will rip it up. Terriers are sent into **** dens to flush them out, and those aren't big dogs.

This doesn't mean a single large dog will come out unscathed. I have no doubt that a large dog would triumph over a raccoon, but what happens if the winner comes back with his face all clawed up? My fear wouldn't be the dog loosing but the dog sustaining injuries if it cornered the ****.

Additionally, dogs inexperienced in the rough and tumble world who do manage to corner a **** may be in for quite a shock if they've led a happy couch potato catch the ball legs go for a walk life and all of a sudden they are thrust into the world of tooth-and-claw and fight-for-your-life. For that matter, any human with a fist sized rock should be able to kill a ****. You want to jump in and do that? Probably not. Maybe if you grew up in a log cabin in the woods hunting and fishing you'd not think twice (akin to the coonhounds dashing in and ripping up the ****) but those in suburbia with our office jobs in air conditioned buildings we probably don't have the mentality to dive in and do that. Same with our suburban dogs. Instinct only gets one so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Their defense will not matter if they get bitten, they will get rabies. Please vaccinate your dogs.
My dog is up to date on his shots, the only reason why this rabies virus is driving me up the walls is because it seems to be resurfacing. Almost every other week I'm hearing something about a rabid animal biting somebody and it's happening in areas only an hour or two away from me.

About maybe two months ago when I was visiting a friend we both saw an Akita tustling with a male raccoon. He told me a few nights before the **** would come out and growl at him & when he would try to go grab his gun and come back It Disappears and while the akita was fighting with it we saw it foaming at the mouth (it might made my heart sink) , when the neighbor came home a few hours after the dog killed it we urged him to take the dog to the hospital. At first he was hesitate (Are you kidding me?!) but eventually he did, thankfully the dog was vaccinated and got a rabies booster but now I don't wanna go anywhere near at all despite that, but I do wonder if the dog would've still got a rabies booster if it was unvaccinated.
 

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If your dog is vaccinated I wouldn't worry very much about rabies. In the case that something DOES happen, it would be the same as with the akita. Off o the vet for treatment and a booster.

Also, dogs foam at the mouth for other reasons, and even IF the akita was infected by the raccoon, it wouldn't be foaming at the mouth due to the infection while still fighting the raccoon that infected it.

A raccoon is unlikely to win against your dog, but your dog can still get bitten and would need vetrinary care.

I wouldn't worry about rabies though. Since your dog is vaccinated already.
 

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My dog is up to date on his shots, the only reason why this rabies virus is driving me up the walls is because it seems to be resurfacing. Almost every other week I'm hearing something about a rabid animal biting somebody and it's happening in areas only an hour or two away from me.

About maybe two months ago when I was visiting a friend we both saw an Akita tustling with a male raccoon. He told me a few nights before the **** would come out and growl at him & when he would try to go grab his gun and come back It Disappears and while the akita was fighting with it we saw it foaming at the mouth (it might made my heart sink) , when the neighbor came home a few hours after the dog killed it we urged him to take the dog to the hospital. At first he was hesitate (Are you kidding me?!) but eventually he did, thankfully the dog was vaccinated and got a rabies booster but now I don't wanna go anywhere near at all despite that, but I do wonder if the dog would've still got a rabies booster if it was unvaccinated.
What happens to an unvaccinated dog exposed to a rabid animal depends on what protocol is followed. They will urge the owner to euthanize the dog, and if the owner refuses then the dog will be placed in 6 month quarantine. It will either be given the rabies vaccine upon entering quarantine, or a month before leaving it. If, during quarantine, it shows signs of rabies it will be euthanized since there's no treatment for dog's with rabies.
 

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Foaming at the mouth isn't really a huge rabies indicator. Odd behavior, loss of motor control, or fear of water is more accurate.

We have a raccoon hanging around here; he's very cute but irritating. They can get feisty if they feel their food is threatened but for the most part can be told off with a shout.
 

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My dogs cornered a Marmot under one of my dog houses last week. Although not as big as a ****, they can be really nasty when cornered. Susie ended up with it biting her on the nose before she grabbed it and killed it. She then took it down into the field and buried it like she did the last one she got. Luckily we do not have Rabies in our area.
 

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I agree with Akado1

***** are one tough animal. I have been on several **** hunts and seen them hold off a pack of experienced hounds. The hounds are experienced because they learned the hard way to back off until we got there to shoot the ****. Sometimes a **** will tree and sometimes the dogs will get to it before it can tree. We had a few dogs that would kill the **** but the **** got his licks in too.
Never had issues with rabies
 
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