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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an adopted lab/bloodhound puppy, previously thought to be 1 year old but now I'm thinking he is a few months younger than that. He is very sweet and friendly, has zero aggression and loves everybody that he meets. When he first came here he had a big problem with jumping up on people, like my roommates and friends, but that has mostly stopped. He is starting to learn that sitting nicely gets him attention while jumping gets him pulled away into another room alone.

He does have a lot of energy, and since he is fabulous with other dogs I like to bring him to the local dog park to play and get some of his energy out and socialize him. But he jumps up on EVERYONE. I apologize and pull him away, but most people don't mind and pet him anyways, reinforcing his jumping habit before I can get him away. It makes me very nervous that he'll knock someone over or hurt them, especially when people bring toddlers and small children into the park. We usually leash up & go when that happens. ):

Is there any advice for how to train him to stop jumping on strangers at the dog park?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have experience using one, so maybe they are awful, but have you looked into an anti-jump harness?
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No I haven't, I didn't even know they made them. I'll have to look into it as an option. Would this be okay to wear at the dog park, where he's going to be running and playing pretty rough though?

Thank you for the suggestion!
 

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I tell my clients to explain that they are training their dogs and ask if the stranger would like to help them train their dog and assure them it's easy. Usually, if phrased that way, people will help. If not, just say, "I'm sorry, but I need to work on my dog's jumping up. I guess you can't pet him today." If the dog fails, I have them say, "Sorry, he's having an off day. Would you like to see a trick instead?" or something along those lines.

I showed my clients how to approach people and they say it does work. I also have different things they do depending on how hard/easy it is for the dog to wait to greet.

First step is just waiting for the dog to look at you before giving saying, "Okay, go say hi" to your dog and then having him say hi--even if it's crazy, as long as he gave you that attention first. Then you can build up that attention to either longer attention to you, calmer attention to you, or different behaviors (sit, touch, down).
 

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Honestly, I'm kind of rude about it now. I used to try and be nice but Aspen's jumping went from non-existent to constant. People always say, "it's okay, I love dogs!" I'm at the point where I say, "It's not okay with me. I do not want my dog jumping on people. If she doesn't sit nicely then you may not pet her. I'm sorry."

Having that consistency will really help your dog.
 

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I get it. Annoying when it's something you're working on, but often people say ''it's allright'' and pet (dog already there and jumping) because they are just being polite.

If you do ask, many people will help. Ultimately though it may come down to management. Each time your dog jumps just makes it more likely in the future. There's already a pretty good reinforcement history for jumping. You need to come up with a way to prevent your dog jumping (perhaps on leash around people at this time) and ask for/teach a sit or whatever you do want instead.
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We had this problem with our girl when we first got her and like a few people have said, we would just tell people in advance. Some people will say "oh, it's ok, I don't mind" but when you explain that if she learns it's ok to adults, she'll do it to children, they usually get the idea.

If you go to a park and it's full of people, you obviously can't talk to everyone so sometimes it's easier to avoid the park so that you don't reinforce bad habits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yesterday when we went I consistently pulled him away, leashed him, and exited for a time-out whenever he jumped up, and I think he is slowly understanding that jumping = leaving because he started to do it less. Either that, or he finally got so tired after playing that he just didn't have the energy to jump.

I will try to be more outspoken when at the park and interrupt when he jumps to ask people to please ignore him. And then when I catch up, I'll have him sit before he can be petted. Sometimes it's just hard because I am fairly young looking and nearly everyone there is 5-10+ years my senior, so telling older people what to do can be a little awkward!
 
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