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Hi everyone! I need help with my 2 year old rescue. He’s the most gentle giant, loves to cuddle and play. At the moment we do not have a fenced yard, so we take him for walks everyday. He’s 70 pounds and full of energy. He’s super strong. I have a difficult time taking him for walks because he pulls so much. We use a chain training collar but it doesn’t help. He pulls so much that we have to stop walking because he struggles to breathe. We have also realized that he is not socialized well with other dogs. When he sees other dogs during his walks he starts to bark and scream and tries to launch towards their direction. Because of the pulling he’s broken a few collars and a harness. My worst fear is that he breaks another, gets away from me and hurts someone else’s dog. I assume that in his 2 years of life he wasn’t walked at all or taken outside to be socialized with other dogs. He’s great with my cats at home and my toddler daughter. I will also be looking into taking him for training but I thought I’d try here for some advice. Thanks for your help.
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He looks like a panda! Please tell me he's caled Panda! ? He looks to be in great shape too :)

Others will be able to give you advice on lead walking but, as you've discovered, choke chains really don't work. As for his reactivity, the best approach is, for now, to try to avoid him getting so close to other dogs that he reacts - even if that means staying about half a mile away from them. It's not always easy, but some people manage this by walking their dogs at silly o'clock in the morning.

Once he's had a few calm, uneventful walks, his general level of arousal should fall (when a dog has a 'moment', the chemicals that course through the body can take days to dissipate). When he sees a dog, but doesn't react because it's too far away to be a concern, get his attention on you and give him a treat, then move even further from the other dog. You want to build up an association - 'See a dog, Mum gives me a treat. Yay!' Don't think of it as a reward for 'being good'. If he's having to be good, that implies he's a bit concerned by the dog which means you're too close.

Once his automatic reaction when he sees a dog is to turn to you for a treat, you can get slightly closer to other dogs. If he reacts, you got too close so need to back off again. You want the other owner to think 'I don't know why they're distracting their dog and giving him treats - he obviously has no problem with my dog whatsoever'! You may not ever get to the point where he actively wants to interact with other dogs but that's fine - you just want him to regard them as unimportant.

There's more on this approach here: Behavior Adjustment Training: A New Approach to Problem Behaviors
 
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