Dog Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi. This is gonna be long, because I don't know how to tell short stories. Sorry in advance.

My family and I have 4 dogs, all male. One Lhasa Apso, 17, and 3 Pugs, 8, 5, and 4. We've had our Lhasa since he was about 6, and our 8 and 5 year old Pugs we raised from puppies. Our most "recent" addition, our 4 year old/soon to be 5 in April white Pug, we got when he was about 6 months old. He is the center of this post.

He had a rough beginning. His first owner got him, along with a girl from his litter, from the same breeder we got our two other Pugs from. We suspect he might have been abused a bit and favoritism was showed to the girl due to some of his odd behaviors at times. One day, both of them ran away. The girl came back shortly after; he did not. He spent about a week out in the elements, all while still being a young puppy. My mom had been following the updates the breeder posted on Facebook along the way, so we had known about the whole situation prior. Then, he came back home, and I think the breeder intervened and got him out of that place. He put him back up for adoption, at a heavily discounted price compared to what his white Pugs are regularly, probably because he was already a bit older and such. He also put his name on Facebook, which happened to be the name of my late maternal grandfather. So, my mom was interested in getting him, and shortly after, we did.

We expected him to have some behavior problems and other abnormalities due to what he experienced. And he did. He peed inside throughout the day, despite supposedly being housetrained already, but we thought maybe that's because when he ran away, he could go anywhere he wanted, whenever, so he thought he still could. He (gross warning) ate poop. Gross as it was, we figured when he ran away, maybe he ate poop to survive, so that could explain why he still does. He chewed and ate furniture. This doesn't really have a direct root in his running away experience, but we mostly attributed it to the fact that he was still technically a puppy and you know how puppies can be. We figured he was going to grow out of all of this.

However, now he is 4, going on 5, and he still does all of these behaviors. It's only gotten worse, in my opinion. I ask myself, if a lot of these behaviors were due to his experience, why is he still doing them, so many years after the incident? Shouldn't that just be a distant memory now, especially since he was a puppy when it happened? I'd think dogs are like humans in the way that we don't remember really anything at all from when we were born to 1 year old. I feel like the experience should not be influencing his actions anymore since it's been so long.

But here we are. He still marks inside throughout the day, despite us making sure he pees multiple times each time we take him out, and we take our dogs out 3-4 times a day. He still eats poop... unfortunately. With our Lhasa being 17, he has a mind of his own when it comes to going to the bathroom, and he typically doesn't follow any schedule. He sort of just goes whenever he wants to. Since we don't keep an eye on our dogs 24/7, the Pug usually gets to the poop before we can. And the most terrible thing... he still eats furniture. It's gotten really bad. Our current set of living room furniture is second hand, because we had to get something quick after we had to dispose of our last set of furniture due to a flea outbreak we had here a few years ago. This furniture did not come in the best condition; it already had some holes and such in it, but we tried our best to work on it and patch them up. But the Pug does not care. He has ripped open pretty much all the patched holes, and has made multiple new holes. The furniture is filled with white stuffing and foam. He eats this on the daily, now. Some days it's a little, some days when we can't monitor as much, it's a decent amount.

And the worst part of all of this is that he has influenced our other Pugs to do this. Our Lhasa is mostly a sleeping dog now, so he isn't involved, thank goodness. But our two other Pugs now eat the foam quite often as well, when they never ever used to behave this way. Even when they were puppies, they never did anything this bad. It's starting to severely concern me and my family, because God knows what this foam and stuffing is made out of. It's probably cancerous stuff, and my dogs are eating it and having it go through their bodies every single day.

I'm very worried one of them is going to develop a serious health issue due to this. But we do not know what to do at this point. As much as I'd love to send him to obedience school or something of the sort, my family can't afford it, and I don't know how much it would do for these issues anyway which must be so deep-rooted in him to still be doing them years later. We also don't want to buy new furniture, because we believe he will just destroy that stuff too, and it'd be like dumping money into the trash. We give them enough bones and toys. We feed them enough. We give them enough attention. They are just doing this to do it.

I can't help but feel deep down inside that if I had known this dog was going to be like this beforehand, I would have convinced my family not to get him. And I hate feeling that way. It makes me feel so bad, because this dog does have his sweet moments. But it's just been a lot. Way more than we ever thought.

If you read through all of this, you deserve an award. I'd greatly appreciate any sort of advice, because at this point, we're desperate. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I don't think puppies really outgrow doing naughty things I think we have to teach them what we want them to do instead
My havanese mix tried to mark in the house last year I went back to puppy basics left him in his crate when I couldn't watch him and caught him before he marked every time also contained him in the living room when I was able to watch him eventually he learned to only mark outside
However I still have issues with him marking at other peoples houses
once dogs start bad habits it's harder to break them gotta be vigilant if he is able to mark you were not paying enough attention yes it's a pain in the butt for a little while lol but eventually it will pay off!
Same with tearing up furniture the more he's able to do it the harder/longer it will take to stop it
Keep him in a play pen or crate when you can't watch him until he is more trustworthy




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I don't think puppies really outgrow doing naughty things I think we have to teach them what we want them to do instead
My havanese mix tried to mark in the house last year I went back to puppy basics left him in his crate when I couldn't watch him and caught him before he marked every time also contained him in the living room when I was able to watch him eventually he learned to only mark outside
However I still have issues with him marking at other peoples houses
once dogs start bad habits it's harder to break them gotta be vigilant if he is able to mark you were not paying enough attention yes it's a pain in the butt for a little while lol but eventually it will pay off!
Same with tearing up furniture the more he's able to do it the harder/longer it will take to stop it
Keep him in a play pen or crate when you can't watch him until he is more trustworthy
This does sound like a good idea in theory. However, the unfortunate thing here is that we have him sleep in a crate every night, to prevent him from doing all these bad things over night. So he probably associates positive feelings with the crate considering it’s been his bed since forever. Lately, if we even try to put him on a bed, he jumps down and runs to his crate. So I’m afraid that if we try to put him in a crate for doing bad things, it’ll change his perspective of the crate, and he might think he’s being bad by being in there at night? I don’t know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
My dog sprocket stays in his play pen all day when I'm at work he loves it in there yet when I was working on the marking issue I still put him in there when I couldn't watch him it's not about punishment it's to keep him from having accidents the more accidents he had the harder it will be to stop them



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
My dog sprocket stays in his play pen all day when I'm at work he loves it in there yet when I was working on the marking issue I still put him in there when I couldn't watch him it's not about punishment it's to keep him from having accidents the more accidents he had the harder it will be to stop them
Yeah that sounds like a good solution for your dog and your situation then. I still just wonder if it would be the best solution for my dog. The other thing is I thought about is since we have multiple dogs, I feel like it might be easier for him to interpret being in a crate during the day as a punishment when he can see all the other dogs roaming freely and he's just sitting stationary in the middle of it all. Maybe you have multiple dogs too though, and if so, I'd be curious as to if there was any reaction like that from him at first, or if the other dogs showed any reaction.

I would be willing to try this, I just don't want to create a new problem on top of what's already there, you know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I did have another dog up until last summer I had to put her down she was always free in the house but sprocket was always in a play pen when I worked he's still young and don't trust him yet to have free roam
I would think it would take an adjustment period but you can't just let him roam free if he's not trustworthy just creates and keeps bad habits


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I should add that the play pen shouldn't be all day it should be when u can't watch him
Like when your working or busy with dinner things like that catching him before he marks is ideal when he's out of his pen
U can always use a belly band too if you don't feel like ur capable of catching him before he marks although that won't teach him not to mark usually just will keep it off your floor and walls



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
what is their walk schedule like? Sound like maybe the pug needs to get some more exercise. I have a labxborder collie cross and watch my sisters Boston terrier cross who cant weigh more than 20 pounds if that. She requires A LOT more exercise than my dog. She will start to find things around the house to chew up and also tries getting into everything. She will drive you absolutely insane if she doesn't get walked for a good hour in the morning. Maybe try an extra walk with just him or a longer walk with the group. Maybe it would calm some of his destructive behaviors down. Good luck :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
This does sound like a good idea in theory. However, the unfortunate thing here is that we have him sleep in a crate every night, to prevent him from doing all these bad things over night. So he probably associates positive feelings with the crate considering it’s been his bed since forever. Lately, if we even try to put him on a bed, he jumps down and runs to his crate. So I’m afraid that if we try to put him in a crate for doing bad things, it’ll change his perspective of the crate, and he might think he’s being bad by being in there at night? I don’t know.
You don't put a dog in a crate for being bad, you do it to keep them from being bad. So if you see him pooping, just say no, pick it up and throw it out; don't put him in the crate though. However, if you are about to head to work, grocery store, etc. and can't watch him, take him for a vigorous walk then place him in the crate. Plus you may want to restart house training, all the way back to puppy pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
what is their walk schedule like? Sound like maybe the pug needs to get some more exercise. I have a labxborder collie cross and watch my sisters Boston terrier cross who cant weigh more than 20 pounds if that. She requires A LOT more exercise than my dog. She will start to find things around the house to chew up and also tries getting into everything. She will drive you absolutely insane if she doesn't get walked for a good hour in the morning. Maybe try an extra walk with just him or a longer walk with the group. Maybe it would calm some of his destructive behaviors down. Good luck :)
Reading this makes me realize that we probably don't actually walk him enough. :dog-shy:

As I think I mentioned in my original post, we take our dogs outside 3-4 times a day, but it's mostly just to go to the bathroom. So typically it's 5 minutes maximum each time. So hearing your sister's dog needs walked for an hour makes me go yikes! I guess why we don't walk him more is that he usually does run back inside once he's done with his business? But maybe we've just trained him to be like that... unfortunately. Also, I live in PA so of course it's winter currently and very snowy and cold sometimes. Being short-haired dogs, our Pugs don't like being outside during this time for very long because they get cold easy (we've tried coats and boots for some of them a while back but it was a struggle to get them on and sometimes they wouldn't stay on). Another thing I'm thinking about is schedules that make walking him for longer difficult. My dad works a 9-5 job so he can't really do anything for the dogs during the day. My mom has a stay at home job, which sounds convenient, but she always acts like she has to be tied to her computer all day... (which is untrue but let me not start shade on a dog forum :)) And right now, I'm pretty available, but unfortunately the winter thing causes problems and in a couple months, I'll be starting school that's 9-5, so I'll be unavailable, too.

So yeah, I'd love to try to take him outside for longer, I just feel like there's a lot of hurdles at the moment. Sigh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
You don't put a dog in a crate for being bad, you do it to keep them from being bad. So if you see him pooping, just say no, pick it up and throw it out; don't put him in the crate though. However, if you are about to head to work, grocery store, etc. and can't watch him, take him for a vigorous walk then place him in the crate. Plus you may want to restart house training, all the way back to puppy pads.
I suppose that is true. I see what you mean by that. I still worry a bit, but this makes more sense spelled out like this (which is what I need sometimes).

About the puppy pads, I'd love to try that, but knowing him, I think he would just eat them. :eyeroll:
This is why we sort of have trouble with our old Lhasa just going to the bathroom wherever. We have always wanted to put pads down so he could go on those instead. But we can't due to the Pug that will most likely eat them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I did have another dog up until last summer I had to put her down she was always free in the house but sprocket was always in a play pen when I worked he's still young and don't trust him yet to have free roam
I would think it would take an adjustment period but you can't just let him roam free if he's not trustworthy just creates and keeps bad habits
I should add that the play pen shouldn't be all day it should be when u can't watch him
Like when your working or busy with dinner things like that catching him before he marks is ideal when he's out of his pen
U can always use a belly band too if you don't feel like ur capable of catching him before he marks although that won't teach him not to mark usually just will keep it off your floor and walls
I'm sorry to hear that about your other dog. :( That's always rough.

But that's good to hear that both of them seemed to deal with the play pen thing just fine. True, everything does take some getting used to I suppose. Yeah, that makes sense that it shouldn't be all day and shouldn't really be used after he does something bad, but before he can as a preventative. That makes it seem a bit better.
The belly band thing does seem interesting, but that's true that it probably won't prevent the actual behavior, just the mess. But it's an option at least. Thanks for all your advice. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Sorry to hear about your troubles. I would suggest the crate or a pen when you can't keep a direct eye on him. In terms of him being crated while the other dogs are loose, they don't really associate that with "I'm bad" or "that's not fair."

I have an 11yr old mix breed who's great indoors and when we aren't home and only uses her crate for a bed. She rarely is closed in it. We also recently adopted a Chihuahua from the pound. He's been living in kennels for almost 8 months, so he needed a house training refresher. I kept him tethered to me (6ft leash attached to him and my belt loop) whenever I was home and just puttering around the house for the first week or so. Any time I can't keep an eye on him he goes in his pen.

He doesn't associate it with bad things, he's actually quite happy to go in, even though the other dog is loose. Basically he's either in my sight or in his pen at all times. As he gets better I get to be less vigilant with him. I noticed it helping a lot.

A daily walk - even if it's a half hour, or in the evening will definitely help as well. I feel you on the cold thing, it regularly gets -40 here in the winter. A walk stimulates them mentally more than just running in the yard would. If it's too cold though, maybe chasing a ball or playing with him indoors for a while would help release some energy for now, until it's nicer and you can start getting a daily walk in with him. Again, it doesn't HAVE to be in the morning. An evening walk is still better than no walk :)

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top