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Im just judging by what i can see in the photo is that the gums look healthy around the tooth so i would take that as a sign that the tooth is fine. Thats my thought anyway
 

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It does look like you are missing part of that one tooth though, so please keep an eye on that.

Have you considered using raw chicken wings or a half carcass if she is a bigger dog, a couple of times a week? These are good for dental hygiene (but must be raw).
 

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That yellow thing on the upper end of the teeth is Tartar . Because you brush your dog's teeth it should not be there .
either you can remove it by brushing that area gently or what the VET's suggest is to give shank bone to dog everyday It's a natural tooth cleaner for dogs and keeps the tarter clean .

If it is on one teeth than it is not a problem .
But if it is on multiple teeths it can convert into a reoccuring gum disease in future .

These things are pretty normal in dogs and happen due to poor Oral Hygiene .
If Oral Hygiene of Dogs is taken care of then your dog won't face these problems in the long run .

I hope it helped.
For more information i would suggest to consult a VET .
 

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The pictures are quite unclear and doesn’t show the whole mouth but it’s obvious that the dog have quite much plaque and tartar on the teeth. It’s great that you brush every day but to remove the tartar I think you need to remove it at the vet. Probably the dog have quite severe Plaque and tartar building or the start of the dental and oral hygiene with brushing every day have begun too late.

Plaque and tartar often leads to Periodontists disease which is causing teeth loss and is obviously very painful for the dog. I would definitely recommend you to take the dog to the vet and get them thoroughly cleansed (ultrasonic not scraping). If you don’t and the tartar develops in to periodontitis I can reassure you that it will cause a lot of money and pain. When you’ve got the teeth cleansed you can continue with daily brushing, appropriate bones (not dentastix or similar) and maybe some oral care supplements to keep the dental and oral hygiene good.

I recently took a dog with severe tartar built to the vet and unfortunately it had developed into periodontitis and they had to extract two teeth that were too damaged to be saved. This is the before and after pictures so you can really see the difference and the benefit of doing it:

Before (This was actually about 8 months before the vet visit so it was even worse than this):
247FBBB5-980A-4159-8471-704EE742A313.jpeg


After:
FCACA275-805A-448D-B751-A39FE39C4F2B.jpeg


And no, this isn’t my dog, I just took her to the vet.
 

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I think what needs to be noted is wolves yotes ect dont have sparkling white teeth so why should dogs. If you look at pictures of wolves teeth you see the same staining on wolves canines just like op dog. When you see fresh skulls of other wild animals you also see staining on teeth and these are all wild animals who eat raw and plant matter.
 

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Teddy is 7
OK at 7 its not the worst set of teeth. But obviously its something to keep an eye on.

Please note those commercial dental chew bars are rubbish just a silly snack and not a dental aid at all.. Raw bones are a far better and cheaper way to keep a dogs teeth in check or just soft brushing very regularly..
 

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Wolves might not have sparkling white teeth but in general they have a much better dental hygiene than dogs. And the wolves who get bad teeth suffer and/or dies if they’re unable to hunt and eat correctly.

You can’t really equalize dogs and wolves since the dentition have shown to significantly get worse due to the breeding and lifestyle of dogs. If you compare how a wolf lives and eats it’s very different from the average dog. The diets are very different and hence the oral hygiene.

Breeding and genetics also play a big part. Generally smaller breeds have bigger issues with dental problems since they have a smaller space in their mouth. The genetics says x amounts of teeth while the mouth can hold z amounts of teeth. A tigher and cramper space increase the issues with tartar build-up. And since us humans haven’t seemed to care about not breeding dogs with bad oral hygiene it’s not weird that dogs in general have worse dental hygiene compared to wolves.

For Wolves it’s the natural selection that decides. If they suffer from bad teeth they will most likely pass away and not spread their offspring in the same degree as the superior, healthier wolf. And they will also suffer from complications and diseases, which we can spare the dog of.

It’s believed that about 85% of all dogs suffer from dental and/or gum diseases. And the single most prominent reason is due plaque and tartar build-up. Plaque and tartar can lead to gingivitis (painful inflammation of gums), halitosis (bad breath) and periodontitis disease (tooth loss), etc, which ultimately can result in degradation of the jaw bone and heart disease etc.

So therefore I would be very careful with my dogs dental care and hygiene. They don’t have to be bright pearly white, but a lot of plaque and tartar build-up definitely can cause a lot of issues and pain.

I think the pictures are way to unclear to decide the condition of the dogs teeth and it doesn’t either show the whole mouth.
 
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