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Hi, i have a 7 month old samoyed and have a problem of him suddenly changing behaviour. It happens sometimes when im playing with him and most of the time when im walking him in the morning or afternoon. It always happens so suddenly, he would jump on me, bite my pants,hands,leg and anything he could see, becoming very clingy, going through my legs, and biting his leash when going for walks. I dont think its meant to show aggresion as ive seen him getting angry before for walking under the hot sun for too long(i didnt know too well about samoyeds that time as i was a beginner) and this behaviour is completely different. Could dogs do that when they feel too excited perhaps? Or maybe its another sign of aggresion? What should i do to prevent it?
Any help given is appreciated!
Thanks!
 

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I would say this isn't aggression, it's overexcitement, maybe paired with a bit of testosterone which makes him behave like an adolescent boy (temper tantrums, slammed doors...). This isn't a reason for neutering BTW, it's just a normal part of development. Have a read of this thread, which should help: What would you do?
 

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Thanks for the reply! I also thought about that at first. But is there any way to do anything about it though? Because it really hinders me from walking him everyday as we barely move at all because he keeps on jumping at me...
 

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Did you spot the link to the thread I gave? They can blend into the background of the post, but it's here: What would you do?

Basically, what worked for us was turning away, facing a fence, tree, whatever, pulling our arms in, and ignoring him - no telling off, no saying anything, just watching the sky and thinking calming thoughts... Then when he calmed down we'd praise/treat him and walk on. Sometimes he'd start up again straight away, then we'd do it again...and again.. and again. It helped to wear thick old/charity shop clothes that would give us some protection and we didn't worry about getting damaged.

Sometimes we attached his lead to whatever was convenient and stood just out of reach.

My dog was worst in open spaces, and towards the end of the walk. Keeping walks shorter, maybe fitting in an extra one to compensate, may help. I clung to narrow paths, lanes, and edges of fields, where he was less likely to kick off and it was easier either to find something to attach the lead to or just face away from him without him being able to come round the other side. He would also do it in the garden occasionally and I would carry a plastic trug at all times to hold in front of me to block him, which was enough to stop him.

Hang on in there - it does pass, though it can take a while and even when you think he's grown out of it, extra excitement, e.g. a trip down the beach on a windy day, might kick it off again. At one point I'd see my dog approaching with that look in his eye, then he'd think twice and veer off again - then I'd praise him and give him a treat. Sometimes I think he did this on purpose just to get the treat but if it meant he saw that as a better behaviour than jumping up, I wasn't complaining!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks a lot! I'll be sure to try that out. I hope this works?. I'll update as soon as he changes behaviour!
 

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There are a variety of ways to teach your furkid to walk politely on leash without biting or jumping. One of my favorite training is this, rather than reprimanding your furkid for tugging and mouthing while walking, teach him to relax at the sight of the leash. Begin by touching the leash while it’s hanging on the wall, without picking it up. Be ready to reward your pooch for calm behavior. Mark with a “good” or a click any resting behavior, such as standing still, sitting or lying down while you are touching the leash. As your furkid stays relaxed, touch and move the leash while continuing to reward his calm behavior. Then practice moving the leash around your furkid while rewarding relaxation.

Best Singapore Vet
 
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