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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My GSD female we got when she was 5 months, now a year and 2 months old. she use to pee when we approched and now she doesnt, unless shes introuble and knows it. she hasnt in MONTHS! for me but my dad tonight was playing with her and so was i, i walked away to set my stuff down and she layed on the ground peed and trotted away from him. is this normal for dogs to do still? any way to stop it? im trying to get her to be able to come in more but if she pees we cant have her inside. i would love to have her in more but if she pees because of my dad it wouldnt work very well. we have had her in a few times and she loves it. she will lay by my side on the ground or by my feet if im sitting on the sofa.
 

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if she is peeing when you approach her, it has absolutely NOTHING with knowing that she's done anything wrong, dogs do not know right from wrong. it has everything to do with the fact that she is afraid of you... dogs do know safe vs unsafe or works vs doesn't work. using fear and intimidation to train a dog will make them distrust you. if you've had her for more than a year, and she is still doing things that you don't like, then you have failed to train her. if she is peeing during play, then it is unlikely she sees it as play, and instead feels threatened. this isn't something that you can expect the dog to just change, the humans involved in her life need to change. if she isn't used to being inside, she needs regular trips out to relieve herself where she is supposed to, she will not just know to go outside. she is a normal dog that needs patient, consistent, gentle training.



Dog | Forum | Rocks!
 

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Dad is much scarier than you are. Dad needs to be sure never to scold the pup or speak sternly to her. She's a sensitive dog. The peeing is an appeasement gestures as in "please don't be mad at me!"


As Fawkese says, the family needs to manage the dog in a way she is not getting in trouble. That means PREVENTING the situations where she might be naughty, rather than scolding her afterwards.

The dog must not be scolded at all, EVER.
If she does something "bad" then learn from what happened and prevent her access to what ever she did next time.

Teach her some GOOD cues so you can ask her to do good things if she is in the middle of being naughty. So for instance teach her to "come" and to "sit" and reward her with treats. If she is doing something naughty call her to you and ask for a sit and reward her. ALWAYS use a gentle and encouraging voice. No one should be shouting at this dog.
 

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Overall, it sounds like she is not house trained either. You'll need to teach her this using rewards for peeing outside. It NEVER works to house train a dog by scolding for accidents. All that teaches a dog is to fear peeing near people. The dog has no idea they are being scolded for peeing indoors. You end up with a dog who is just as likely to sneak into another room and pee, as go out to pee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
shes not house trained, when shes in with us she knows not to go to another room, we have a large living room/dining room thats open and one big room and doors to the other rooms are closed so we can always see her. She will lay next to me for 5 to 6 hours and not have to pee, we will let them out for a half hour and bring them back in and they do just fine. i use a lot of treats with her to get her to learn what i want from her, and she listens well to me. she doesnt like my parents that much.
 

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If your parents are the ones to always scold and punish her that's why she avoids them. It's like if a kid has a mom and a dad, mom is always yelling and fussing at the kid, but dad is always calm, praising, and playing with the kid, the kid will naturally want to be with dad and avoid mom.

How were y'all playing with her? Were y'all rough housing, or playing with a ball or toy? Are you sure she was having fun? Did she look anxious when you left her with your dad, and is she normally fearful of your dad?

Like everyone has told you, you're going to have to ignore whatever mistakes she makes, if your fussing at her and punishing her after any amount of time has passed she doesn't know that your fussing at her for making the mistake. She just knows that trash on the ground, something chewed up, pee on the floor etc., means she gets in trouble, not that her doing those things gets her in trouble. If you punish her while she's doing them she learns to do them while you are not watching her, so she'll still do it but be sneaky about it.

You need to teach her other things to do and praise her for doing it, you can teach leave it, and drop it, you can teach her to sit rather then jumping up on people, you can teach her trade so that if she's chewing a shoe you can trade her a tasty doggy chew for it. Doing that you won't have to scold her or punish her and all her interactions with you and your family will be positive and she won't feel like she has to pee as a way of saying please don't be made at me and holler at me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
my dad will paly with her, we have 5-6 jolly balls around the yard and when we kick her ball she will chase it and run back to us and act like shes 'killing' it, she wags her tail and will do it all the time. i always give her treats when shes good. my parents have very little in her and my other dogs training, they didnt wanna be in the training. my parents will play with them, and feed and water if needed but thats it.
 

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sounds like she has a good time with your dad outside, but maybe inside, she is more insecure because your dad is more likely to scold her when she's inside



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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
shes never been inside when hes home, he doesnt want them in because of the hair, i vaccum every other day so he doesnt find out. right now shes laying next to me sleeping for the past 5 hours, waking up a few times to strech and get situated again. my lab is doing the same on the otherside of me but he rarely wakes up, hes been in the house in and out for months and has been when my dad is home. he doesnt pee, bark, go after food, or anything bad inside.
 

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Oh, O.K., I see what you are wondering.

I think we were all assuming that she was submissively peeing inside the house.

Even with your dad outside she may not be submissive peeing, she may have been using the bathroom because she had to go. It's really hard to say unless we are there to see, you can get a video of her doing it, or you can describe what happened a bit better.

When you say she laid on the ground, peed, then trotted away from him, was she crouched on the ground and acting fearful, laying down and happy, or belly up sort of saying please be nice to me?

Did she pee when she was laying down, did she pee like she used to when she was scared of y'all, or was she peeing like she normally would when she has to pee?

When she trotted away was she acting afraid, or like well he's finished playing with me let me see what Scooby is doing?

Honestly she may have just had to pee and is comfortable enough with your dad to pee in front of him. If that's the case then you should have no trouble having her in the house with everyone as long as everyone is calm.

I'd ask your mom and dad to let her in on a trial basis and see how she does with it. Let them know that if she has an accident then you'll clean it up and understand that she has to stay outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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this is simular to the way she is with him. here she was chewing on one of my horses bell boots and she hid in the corner. then she pees.
 

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Ditto Fawkese!
I'm sorry but everything about your dog's body language is screaming "I'm AFRAID!"
:(

I would imagine that many people here would like to help you change this, but are you honestly open to suggestions and willing to change the way you interact with you dog?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
this was early to mid summer a few months after we got her thats my mom, she was rubbing her head. she was so scared of us right away, not much of me but the others. shes a lot better and doesnt look so scared with him but thats how she looks when she pees in the garage with him.
 

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If that is what your pup looks like when she pees, then clearly this is "submissive urination"... meaning she is so scared she is wetting herself. This is a way in dog language to tell the "bigger dog" (ie human) that she is afraid and begging not to be hurt.

So the solution to this problem, is for the humans to try very hard not to frighten the puppy so much. That means do not use a harsh voice, do not yell, do not stoop over her, most of all do not reach for her (even to pet her) or grab her collar and so forth. All those things are very scary for your dog.

Keep in mind that for most dogs, being pet on the head is not fun. Humans mean well, but for the dog, it can feel rather intimidating, even like a mild "attack". That's why your puppy in this picture is crouching and cowering so much. She is not being reassured or comforted at all by your mother's touch. I do understand your mom is trying to comfort the dog, but the dog did not understand that.

Dogs and humans really do speak different languages, and the cross communication results in lots of hurt feelings both ways.

Here is a book you might find really useful to read and perhaps share parts with your family. You can lead the way, even as a "kid" in the family in helping everyone to understand the dogs better. I've seen this happen many times on DogForum... the teenager teaching the parents! :)

"Culture Clash:"
 
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