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But I think it's resource guarding related because he knows the kitchen is where the food is , but anyway he was in kitchen getting under my mums feet so my sister in law tried to chase him out and that's when he snapped :( he didn't get her just gave her a fright, but will keeping him out of kitchen help ? do u think because mum usually drop things on floor for him to eat like carrots etc , I've told her to stop doing it and save it for his bowl , but is their anything else we could try? he's my first dog I'm going to take him back puppy classes soon because he does a few things I'm not happy with like jumping up and plonking him self on people's laps to lick there faces whether they like dogs or not, I do pull him off btw and keep hold of him an he whines and barks a bit to go back to them and I don't think taking him out to another room will improve his social skills at all ,but apart from that he's a pretty good dog I think, but I want to be a good dog owner and stamp those things out of him before they get really bad thank :) x
 

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So how did she try to chase him out? Grab him by the collar? other? Has this happened any other times?

he didn't get her just gave her a fright,
Can you explain that a little more?


Some dogs will go from zero to redline in a very short period of time depending on circumstance and trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So how did she try to chase him out? Grab him by the collar? other? Has this happened any other times?


Can you explain that a little more?


Some dogs will go from zero to redline in a very short period of time depending on circumstance and trigger.
I was outside when it happened , but she said she tried to push him out with her foot and he went for her foot , but he has gone for her before we're food was concerned and snapped at her hand when she tried to push him away from her meal :headshake:, he is very food orientated probably because some idiot told me to show him who boss by taking his food away *blush* I did it once but if I approach his bowl now it's to add something not to take it away , but the rest of the time he's a good dog soft as anything .
 

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So the big question. Is it just your sister that he gets snippy with or everyone? If everyone has an issue, then he's most likely got a problem with food aggression or resource guarding. It's usually a comfort zone thing, something they get used to.

I'm not a trainer, or a behaviorist but have helped friends deal with their issues. If your sister sat down to a plate of food, and you take it from her, what would you expect as a reaction? Food is pretty simple to me, when you fill the bowl, make him wait for it - unless your dog is a free grazer. When he calms down, put the bowl down - but stand beside the bowl and gauge your dogs reaction to your proximity but remain calm. Some trainers are saying you're claiming the food, I don't believe that, it's the dogs food. You need to let the dog figure out that he's not getting what he wants until he's calm, you're not removing something the dog believes is his - you're just not giving him access. I won't remove food, i'll remove the dog from the food - the food isn't the issue, the dog is. Stand between the dog and the food, block the dog from the food if he's being a problem. To me, a confused dog is a thinking dog. Same goes for your mom when she's throwing treats on the floor for the dog, the whole family needs to work with this. If your dog is a free grazer, maybe consider stricter feeding times as in twice a day, makes it easier.

From your other post where he's jumping up in peoples laps and such, most likely your dog doesn't have any boundaries to respect, food included. It's not that he's a bad dog, just has behaviors that need to be corrected.

My dog has a bit of bone aggression, raw meaty bones are his treat. If he's on a bone in the kennel, he's in his safe zone. He's never locked in and the rule is that we leave him alone, that goes for everyone - stay out of his room. However, if he's outside of his kennel (in the shared space) and on a bone, he knows better than to resource guard, but he still tests those limits. I will get his face, not say a word, remain calm til he backs off the bone, it's taking him out of his comfort zone. Then I simply say kennel, he takes his bone and heads to the kennel. Sometimes one has to pick their battles.
 

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Easiest solution is probably going to be increasing the management/supervision. When your SIL is over, crate your dog with a stuffed kong or chew during meal times, use a gate or exercise pen to keep him out of the kitchen, have him outside with you, teach a settle on mat (see video), etc. Just whatever works for you and your family to prevent any resource guarding from happening.

If you really want to fix it, your SIL will need to actually do much of the work. If willing, have her keep some treats in pockets. Show her the different behaviors your dog knows and have her practice asking for them and rewarding. She should then start asking for those behaviors when she needs your dog to do something. For example, ''come'' to get him out of the kitchen as opposed to pushing him with a foot. ;)

Also, I would start some impulse control training to teach him to be polite rather than try to steal food. You and your mom (doesn't guard from you, correct?) should be the ones to work on this. This is not something I would have your SIL (or anyone he does guard from) do for now.

I generally start sitting and with food in hand. Back of hand glued to my knee. If you pull your hand up and away, then your dog is likely to jump up to try and get it. Don't say anything, don't push/pull him away/or try to remove him from the food, just let him figure it out. Keep your hand closed as he licks, paws, etc trying to get the treats. When he stops and backs off, hand opens. If he dives on the food, close fist. If he remains polite, then mark (click or verbal marker if you have one) and/or praise, pick up a treat and give it to him. Continue feeding as long as he remains polite.

Once that is learned, I do different variations...
Treat on knee, treats in a bowl or plate on my lap, plate or bowl on table next to me, treat on floor, etc. Still covering with hand/foot if pushy. Uncover when the dog backs off. If they remains polite pick up and give the treat. Cover anytime they try to steal.

And then I also begin requiring my dogs to actually do more for the rewards. No longer is it, just be polite. It becomes be polite and also do something I ask for in order to get the food. I like to start with a hand target as it means they actually need to move away from food to get the food. Sit, down, tricks, also are great.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So the big question. Is it just your sister that he gets snippy with or everyone? If everyone has an issue, then he's most likely got a problem with food aggression or resource guarding. It's usually a comfort zone thing, something they get used to.

I'm not a trainer, or a behaviorist but have helped friends deal with their issues. If your sister sat down to a plate of food, and you take it from her, what would you expect as a reaction? Food is pretty simple to me, when you fill the bowl, make him wait for it - unless your dog is a free grazer. When he calms down, put the bowl down - but stand beside the bowl and gauge your dogs reaction to your proximity but remain calm. Some trainers are saying you're claiming the food, I don't believe that, it's the dogs food. You need to let the dog figure out that he's not getting what he wants until he's calm, you're not removing something the dog believes is his - you're just not giving him access. I won't remove food, i'll remove the dog from the food - the food isn't the issue, the dog is. Stand between the dog and the food, block the dog from the food if he's being a problem. To me, a confused dog is a thinking dog. Same goes for your mom when she's throwing treats on the floor for the dog, the whole family needs to work with this. If your dog is a free grazer, maybe consider stricter feeding times as in twice a day, makes it easier.

From your other post where he's jumping up in peoples laps and such, most likely your dog doesn't have any boundaries to respect, food included. It's not that he's a bad dog, just has behaviors that need to be corrected.

My dog has a bit of bone aggression, raw meaty bones are his treat. If he's on a bone in the kennel, he's in his safe zone. He's never locked in and the rule is that we leave him alone, that goes for everyone - stay out of his room. However, if he's outside of his kennel (in the shared space) and on a bone, he knows better than to resource guard, but he still tests those limits. I will get his face, not say a word, remain calm til he backs off the bone, it's taking him out of his comfort zone. Then I simply say kennel, he takes his bone and heads to the kennel. Sometimes one has to pick their battles.
its just with my sister in law hes done to at moment , but all he does just sit and watch me, but were mums concerned he sometimes jumps up at her and other people when they eat, he gets fed twice a day doesn't graze(I wont let him) and a dessert either a denti stick or a gravy bones(2) every other day, I know there are behaviors that need correcting and will welcome any help that you or any one else can give thanks :)
 

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Almost sounds like your mom is the common denominator for the dogs behavior from what you're saying. Could be some food aggression combined with some resource guarding of your mom. So if it was you instead of your sister in law that shooed the dog with your foot, would the reaction be the same?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Almost sounds like your mom is the common denominator for the dogs behavior from what you're saying. Could be some food aggression combined with some resource guarding of your mom. So if it was you instead of your sister in law that shooed the dog with your foot, would the reaction be the same?
no he would be fine with it , chased him out the living room yesterday because mum was eating a yogurt and he just went out and layed down in hall way.
 

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If your sister in law doesn't live there, and doesn't interact with the dog on a daily basis, then you have a choice to make.

I wouldn't allow a family member to come in and correct my dog - that will come from me or the gf. If dog is in the kitchen with us, and we have a family gathering or what not, none of her family bothers with him - We both drop raw meat on the floor for the dog when cooking, or if we are prepping his meals for the week. He wouldn't be aggressive, but they don't do it. There's no harm in your sister in law asking for the dog to be removed from the kitchen if he's in the way.

Or, she takes the time to work with the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Easiest solution is probably going to be increasing the management/supervision. When your SIL is over, crate your dog with a stuffed kong or chew during meal times, use a gate or exercise pen to keep him out of the kitchen, have him outside with you, teach a settle on mat (see video), etc. Just whatever works for you and your family to prevent any resource guarding from happening.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uAGaw6KJIc

If you really want to fix it, your SIL will need to actually do much of the work. If willing, have her keep some treats in pockets. Show her the different behaviors your dog knows and have her practice asking for them and rewarding. She should then start asking for those behaviors when she needs your dog to do something. For example, ''come'' to get him out of the kitchen as opposed to pushing him with a foot. ;)

Also, I would start some impulse control training to teach him to be polite rather than try to steal food. You and your mom (doesn't guard from you, correct?) should be the ones to work on this. This is not something I would have your SIL (or anyone he does guard from) do for now.

I generally start sitting and with food in hand. Back of hand glued to my knee. If you pull your hand up and away, then your dog is likely to jump up to try and get it. Don't say anything, don't push/pull him away/or try to remove him from the food, just let him figure it out. Keep your hand closed as he licks, paws, etc trying to get the treats. When he stops and backs off, hand opens. If he dives on the food, close fist. If he remains polite, then mark (click or verbal marker if you have one) and/or praise, pick up a treat and give it to him. Continue feeding as long as he remains polite.

Once that is learned, I do different variations...
Treat on knee, treats in a bowl or plate on my lap, plate or bowl on table next to me, treat on floor, etc. Still covering with hand/foot if pushy. Uncover when the dog backs off. If they remains polite pick up and give the treat. Cover anytime they try to steal.

And then I also begin requiring my dogs to actually do more for the rewards. No longer is it, just be polite. It becomes be polite and also do something I ask for in order to get the food. I like to start with a hand target as it means they actually need to move away from food to get the food. Sit, down, tricks, also are great.
ok ill try those things u said to do and see how we go thank you :) x
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If your sister in law doesn't live there, and doesn't interact with the dog on a daily basis, then you have a choice to make.

I wouldn't allow a family member to come in and correct my dog - that will come from me or the gf. If dog is in the kitchen with us, and we have a family gathering or what not, none of her family bothers with him - We both drop raw meat on the floor for the dog when cooking, or if we are prepping his meals for the week. He wouldn't be aggressive, but they don't do it. There's no harm in your sister in law asking for the dog to be removed from the kitchen if he's in the way.

Or, she takes the time to work with the dog.
I know theres no harm in wanting the dog out if its in the way,ok ill ask them not to correct my dog and ill work on his other lil problems coz I do want to be a good dog owner, they have a dog and I don't say nothing to there dog because its their dog , but I did get an "oh were not saying your a crap dog owner " but reading between the lines they sort of were:(, because my brother said shes scared of him now :( (so probably no chance of her working with him),and yesterday he (my bro)came round and mum gave him a carton of pineapple juice my dog went over to sniff it an maybe he gave it a cheeky lick or something but he (my bro) shoved my dog by his neck out the way:(
 
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