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Hello forum thanks for having me! So I’ve just started feeding 5 dogs on a raw diet, I’ve been doing it for over 10 years now. However the smallest one, a pug/terrier, gets so excited about food that he won’t chew it! He stands there barking the whole time I am preparing the food and demolishes anything put in front of him. However last night I gave him a 100g peice of chicken beast and after trying to swallow it twice and regurgitating it he got it down on the 3rd attempt and to my horror just keeled straight over like he was dead! I tried lifting him by the hind legs and then putting my finger in his mouth to find something to grab but within seconds he was absolutely fine and sniffing about for food again. I am concerned that he may kill himself doing this one day and despite the fact I’m sure he would be quite happy to die gorging himself on food he’s way too precious for us to see him go out like that!
Why would he just keel over like that, like he was unconscious? Should I just cut his food into smaller chunks? Feed him away from the other dogs? He’s an old boy with heart problems. He always finishes way before the others so is never challenged for his food. I’ve read that it is good for them to work for their food so would like to give him big chunks if it is safe.
TIA for any help!
Phil
 

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I'd definitely cut it into smaller pieces, and feed him separately to remove the pressure of feeling the others might get his food if he doesn't eat it first. If he is eating it as fast as that, the choke risk is greater than any benefit of working for it (not sure exactly what you mean by that). If you want him to have something to gnaw on, for his teeth, what about something that he can't bite pieces off (@Buzzu2 please can you confirm if a knuckle bone would be suitable?).
 

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I'd definitely cut it into smaller pieces, and feed him separately to remove the pressure of feeling the others might get his food if he doesn't eat it first. If he is eating it as fast as that, the choke risk is greater than any benefit of working for it (not sure exactly what you mean by that). If you want him to have something to gnaw on, for his teeth, what about something that he can't bite pieces off (@Buzzu2 please can you confirm if a knuckle bone would be suitable?).
Knuckle bones are extremely hard. Hard chewers usually can only gnaw them down over time and they won't splinter.They are really good for getting at the rear teeth too.
There is a downside to this too. There have been cases where dogs chew so hard that they can break teeth, so careful supervision is needed.
My preference these days are raw marrow bones from the butcher shop. The other thing with knuckle bones is to beware of the country of origin. I was always able to find them sourced from the USA or other reliable countries, and not dubious South American or Chinese sources.
 

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Hi. Welcome to the forum. :)

. I’ve read that it is good for them to work for their food
I don't think this means what you think it means. It doesn't mean giving a dog bigger chunks so they have to chew more - it means "working" as in getting food rewards for training/acceptible behaviour, treat dispensers and games such as Find It - using their brains, "hunting" or "foraging" for food.
 

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Hi. Welcome to the forum. :)



I don't think this means what you think it means. It doesn't mean giving a dog bigger chunks so they have to chew more - it means "working" as in getting food rewards for training/acceptible behaviour, treat dispensers and games such as Find It - using their brains, "hunting" or "foraging" for food.
Recently I bought a puzzle dish (slow feeder) for one of mine that gulped her food down without chewing. She would eat so fast that she would begin choking. The puzzle dish worked so well that I bought another for my second speed eater. They actually have a good time working to get their food and eating slower is better. Two of mine are deep chested and Bloat is a concern.
I have just purchased a 3rd puzzle bowl for the normal eater (a young Golden), since she enjoyed "finding" her food in the puzzle dish.
Highly recommend these, and if you are interested, find ones that are food grade safe..no BPA etc. I started with the stainless steel hump in the middle slow feerers. but the Mini Aussie defeated that one easily.

 

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Puzzle or slow-feed bowl is my suggestion. Cut the food up into small pieces and distribute it into the bowl. I have a terrier who is a gulper. I went through three puzzle bowls to find the best one that he couldn't grab large amounts at once, and finally found this one, which works great.

You have to use little pieces, though, not large chunks, or it will not work to slow the dog down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks very much for the replies. With regards to working for the food I meant actually having to chew it as opposed to good behaviour. Can't remember where I read that now it was a while ago and is to do with feeding a whole prey diet specifically. It makes sense to me because we also benefit greatly from chewing food as it produces beneficial digestive juices. I'm feeding them an 80/10/10 frankenprey diet, not long weaned them off of kibble. Do you guys have experience with this? Weight bearing bones from large animals are not good for their teeth from what I have read especially for a small dog like him.
 
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