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Greetings my dog (1 yr old Aus Kelpie) has been limping for a month and a half. The limp is not consistent and when hes full of energy runs complete fine. yet after long walks or after laying around for a while its clearly a noticeable limp. He also holds that foot up while sitting(front foot) and lays down on the opposite side. He still lets me grab his foot and move it around yet he never winces or seems to be in pain.

We've been to the vet and she assumed it was a slight muscle strain so she gave us some medicine however it hasn't helped at all. Honestly not sure what to do at this point since the limp doesn't seem terrible as he would cry out if the pain was bad. But I also don't walk him anymore since I hate seeing him limp. Any advice?
 

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He's young and definitely shouldn't be limping and doing the things you're describing. Something is obviously young, just not obviously diagnosed. If you can, find a vet specialist and take him there. Maybe a Veterinary orthopedic Dr? There are vet specialists for every field, just as there are for people. I'm not sure what specialist you need, but you can call and get advice on that from your current vet.

Hopefully it's something easily treated, but you just don't know. My sister's dog had a swollen leg last year. He had bloodwork and tests done and nothing came back to indicate what was wrong. They assume that he could have been bit by a snake and it was healing (even though no bite area was found). I wish I had known to recommend that she take him to a specialist. He was seen a couple of times over the next month or so and he didn't noticeably get worse, but he ended up passing away after about six weeks. Terribly sad and she never learned what caused it.

For anything that your normal vet doesn't have an answer for, it's a good idea to seek answers from another vet if you're able to.
 

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I would get a second opinion. I have a 1 1/2 year old who did the same thing (started when he was 6 months or so) but it was his back leg, took him to the vet and they did xrays and said everything was fine, they said he probably over did it. The limping never went away, like you I stopped walking my boy cause he would limp so bad. He was still running around with the other dogs but would limp after a particularly hard running session out back. Then one day I went to wipe his paws and he cried so I took him to a different vet, they did xrays as well and turns out he had hip displasia, he ended up having surgery and will have to have another surgery on his other hip in the future.

So my point is that a second opinion can be a good thing in a situation like this. Hope he’s ok.
 

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I third the second opinion. You really need information about what is going on with him, before you can begin to know how to treat it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome thank you for the quick feedback guys. Taking him to a different vet tomorrow hopefully they'll be able to properly diagnose it this time.
 

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Another opinion

I would suggest going to a chiropractic vet. They can do either chiro or acupuncture or both. I would also suggest to limit the walking until you do. And keep them quiet at home in a restricted area. I have learned just like with myself to not overdo when I am or the animal is injured. I would also suggest to ice it three or four times a day and or hose the area. Give the dog some homeopathic arnica Montana 30 x four pills for pain a couple of times a day. The chiro vet maybe able to tell you where the inflammation is. Sometimes it takes a couple of treatments but I have had great success with a chiro vet and sometimes acupuncture. Chiro being my best.

I am not a vet or vet tech. The last dog I had taught me a lot about what to do and what not to do with injuries. One of those things is to keep the dog leashed so they don’t run and hurt themselves. There is a book called dog steps. Helps to understand about their different gaits.

My last dog had an avulsed nail that got caught on a tree trunk while running. He also had some sprains where I had to restrict his movements for a few weeks until he healed. I started to learn from this dog the actual value that he meant to me. Taught me how to be a better owner. And I am grateful to him for that. I miss him terribly.
 

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My dog started limping in the summer. I took her to the vet who said it was probably a muscle strain. At Christmas she fell so I took her to a university with a vet teaching program. The doctor said it was a neurological problem and immediately ordered an mri. It was meningitis. Back in 2006 they didn't really know how to treat the disease so I had her pts a year later later after she started having continuous seizures and went blind. She wasn't even 3 years old. I tried everything--I think I spent $10,000 easily on treatments that last year and would have gladly spent more to save her. Sometimes you just have to consult specialists to get to the truth.
 

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My dog started limping in the summer. I took her to the vet who said it was probably a muscle strain. At Christmas she fell so I took her to a university with a vet teaching program. The doctor said it was a neurological problem and immediately ordered an mri. It was meningitis. Back in 2006 they didn't really know how to treat the disease so I had her pts a year later later after she started having continuous seizures and went blind. She wasn't even 3 years old. I tried everything--I think I spent $10,000 easily on treatments that last year and would have gladly spent more to save her. Sometimes you just have to consult specialists to get to the truth.

Ours wound up with a diagnoses of 'sterile meningitis' about a year and a half ago. Its an autoimmune disorder, not bacterial or viral. Our Vet referred us to a neurological center. The treatment, at least for us, was to blunt her immune system, with massive doses of steroids. Once under control, we now continue to give her a very small dose for maintenance. So far she is doing well, neurologist declared her in remission. We hope for many more good years with her, but the past year and a half, has been very difficult for all of us. We too went through the MRI and spinal tap and more, to get to the diagnosis.
 

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Ours wound up with a diagnoses of 'sterile meningitis' about a year and a half ago. Its an autoimmune disorder, not bacterial or viral. Our Vet referred us to a neurological center. The treatment, at least for us, was to blunt her immune system, with massive doses of steroids. Once under control, we now continue to give her a very small dose for maintenance. So far she is doing well, neurologist declared her in remission. We hope for many more good years with her, but the past year and a half, has been very difficult for all of us. We too went through the MRI and spinal tap and more, to get to the diagnosis.
I'm glad they finally have figured out how to treat this disease and happy your dog is in remission. It was horrible watching Rosie go from a healthy, happy pup to a trembling, scared girl. It was probably the worst year of my 80 years. I could not even contemplate getting another dog after I lost her until a friend suggested fostering. I wound up adopting 2 senior English Setters who had been abandoned when they went blind. And after they passed, I adopted a crippled Pomeranian and took in a 'cocka-tzu' found on the streets of Chicago. They are just as grateful to be alive as I am so we stumble along well together.
 

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nitelite, Its horrible to watch them suffer. We have had Samantha for over 10 years, she will be 11 in January. Suffice to say we are totally attached to her, and will do whatever it takes to keep her quality of life going for as long as possible. Not sure we will ever have another when something happens to Samantha, but that is just too difficult to even think about now. Best of luck with your fosters and adoptees. Kudos to you for doing that.
 
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