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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My family friend's kelpie dog has escaped twice in the past week. He has escaped before through the backyard gate when it was left open accidentally but this time around, he managed to figure out how to escape through the house by charging through the back door into the house and then through the front door. This is the same elderly owner who I talked about before in this forum with a broken leg and is unable to walk his dog.

I think the main problem is that the dog doesn't get any walks during the week. The owner's son is too lazy to walk the dog (he only comes to visit a few times a week) and the elderly man can't physically due to his leg. They are not in the situation to hire a dog walker. I would have gone often to walk the dog but I have my own puppy now on top of full time work so it's really difficult for me to go over and help out.

Based on what I know, this is the current situation:
1. Dog escapes often but does not run very far. He usually runs to the park next door.
2. Luckily, the son was over every time the dog ran out and he managed to catch and carry the dog back with the help of next door neighbours.
3. Dog does not get any physical exercise during the week and they don't have any puzzles or toys to give to the dog so the dog tends to run around in circles around the backyard.
4. As a kelpie, the dog does a lot of nipping. He wouldn't let go of my sister's sleeve last time and he sometimes will accidentally bite our skin when trying to cling onto our pants.
5. l did teach the dog basic commands but his recall sucks and he pulls on the leash like mad.
6. Reactive to other dogs and gets super excited around children so it's hard to control him outside.

:ponder:
In such case, would it be a good idea to bring up the possibility of rehoming the kelpie without sounding rude? Should I buy a kong for him and some stuff to put in the kong?
What are some possible solutions to help the kelpie calm down if rehoming is not possible?
 

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Pets are often people's last social connection. I'm going to assume the broken leg is temporary. Could you rally neighbors, friends, or even a church community around this man to walk his dog?

There's nothing wrong with the dog running around in circles in the back yard, when I had limited space and time I used to have my dog run my stairs. It just sounds like the dog needs more excercize.
 

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I agree with Grabby. The elderly owner seemed unable to care for his dog long before he broke his leg. I would try to encourage him to rehome the dog. Maybe your mother can suggest a approach.
 

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Since I'm pretty sure I remember past posts about this dog, he definitely needs a new home. I think you should try to suggest it and mention he could get hit by a car or disappear anyway if they keep him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Pets are often people's last social connection. I'm going to assume the broken leg is temporary. Could you rally neighbors, friends, or even a church community around this man to walk his dog?

There's nothing wrong with the dog running around in circles in the back yard, when I had limited space and time I used to have my dog run my stairs. It just sounds like the dog needs more excercize.
That is why I'm concerned about bringing this up - the fact that the dog is most likely the owner's social connection at an old age. I would suggest him adopting an adult dog that is more suitable for his living condition i.e. lazier but the owner wants a big fierce looking dog e.g. german shepherd etc and I believe they are in no condition to control, train and exercise higher energy breeds.

So guys, I'm conflicted between telling him to rehome the dog and taking into account that the dog is important to elderly people.
 

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At some point, you have to realize that there is only so much you can do. I get that pets can provide a great emotional service for elderly people. That doesn't mean that the elderly should be given a pass when it comes to being responsible pet owners. You have my admiration for trying to help this dog and this family.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At some point, you have to realize that there is only so much you can do. I get that pets can provide a great emotional service for elderly people. That doesn't mean that the elderly should be given a pass when it comes to being responsible pet owners. You have my admiration for trying to help this dog and this family.
Hahaha thanks sometimes I feel like I'm helping their dog more than the owners. Well, if I take into account the dog's wellbeing, i would suggest them rehoming him. If I'm taking their emotions and feelings into account, then I might not talk about rehoming him. I did forget to mention in the previous post that the owner's leg is broken permanently.
 

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Depending on how elderly the owner is, and without trying to seem callous--it may be likely the Kelpie will need to be rehomed down the line anyway. Wouldn't it be better to find him a suitable home now while he is still fairly young?
I deeply empathize and agree with elderly people having pets, but previous posts make it seem as though this gentleman really doesn't appreciate his dog as a friend--the way many older people do.

In the mean time, I would absolutely be buying this guy some time consuming toys, and an antler chew or other long-lasting gnawable item to help him keep occupied.

I have a Kelpie cross and she has to have things she's doing or else she turns into a hyper wreck. She doesn't even need that much, but she needs consistent opportunities to use her mind and body. Almost any herding breed dog is going to be like that.

Puzzle toys and chews are at least some kind of occupation until you're able to find a better solution. Try to persuade the owner to pitch in and get five or six different kinds, and see if the owner would be willing to start putting his food inside the puzzle toys instead of a bowl so the poor pup gets some kind of job going on in his life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Depending on how elderly the owner is, and without trying to seem callous--it may be likely the Kelpie will need to be rehomed down the line anyway. Wouldn't it be better to find him a suitable home now while he is still fairly young?
I deeply empathize and agree with elderly people having pets, but previous posts make it seem as though this gentleman really doesn't appreciate his dog as a friend--the way many older people do.

In the mean time, I would absolutely be buying this guy some time consuming toys, and an antler chew or other long-lasting gnawable item to help him keep occupied.

I have a Kelpie cross and she has to have things she's doing or else she turns into a hyper wreck. She doesn't even need that much, but she needs consistent opportunities to use her mind and body. Almost any herding breed dog is going to be like that.

Puzzle toys and chews are at least some kind of occupation until you're able to find a better solution. Try to persuade the owner to pitch in and get five or six different kinds, and see if the owner would be willing to start putting his food inside the puzzle toys instead of a bowl so the poor pup gets some kind of job going on in his life.
The owner is about 82 years old and the dog just turned 3 years old. The owner tends to resort to physical punishment and leaves the dog locked up in the backyard without interaction which is why the previous posts suggested that the owner isn't really that capable. I've tried to show him the effect of positive reinforcement but they can't be bothered spending time training him. I did buy a nina ottosson puzzle toy for the dog ages ago but it is left unused unless I go over. I don't know why but it seems that they don't use the stuff I buy for him. For example, I got him a harness and showed them how to put it on which reduces the pulling immensely. This means that walking him is easier for the owner's son. I also bought him a flirt pole so the owner doesn't need to walk to exercise the dog but they don't use it. I'm really confused as to why they don't use these things when it could help their dog to not go insane.
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Based on all you've written here and in previous threads, I rather strongly feel that the dog should be rehomed. However, figuring out how to convince the owner is another issue.
 
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