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So im wondering how long a dog lives after they are starting to get grey hair, Im becoming very anxiety and depressed everyday because i feel im gonna lose the dog anyday.

so im wondering can the dog still live for a couple of years after its starting to get grey hair or how does it work? people have told me that when a dog starts get grey hair, theyre about to die.

This is my first dog ive owned so i dont know if its true or not so i wanted to ask you experts how it really works so my anxiety and such maybe will get lighter.

thinking of losing the dog makes me depressed so i would like to know how it works.
 

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So im wondering how long a dog lives after they are starting to get grey hair, Im becoming very anxiety and depressed everyday because i feel im gonna lose the dog anyday.

so im wondering can the dog still live for a couple of years after its starting to get grey hair or how does it work? people have told me that when a dog starts get grey hair, theyre about to die.

This is my first dog ive owned so i dont know if its true or not so i wanted to ask you experts how it really works so my anxiety and such maybe will get lighter.

thinking of losing the dog makes me depressed so i would like to know how it works.
I would not guess by the color of hair. You can find the longevity average for different breeds to get an idea.

But, no if your dog is healthy and starts turning grey it does not mean anything.
 
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My Luna had grey hair for at least 4 years before she passed the hair color doesn't have much to do with a dogs health I wouldn't worry
My cousin had a black lab that started getting grey hair when he was 5 or so and he didn't pass until he was 14



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Thanks for the response then i dont need to worry as much as i do, The dog is healthy like she was before, i cant see any change in the health other then grey hair.
Its a bordercollie and i adopted her so i dont know her age or when she was born. the dog is White and brown so the grey hair is showing good, which started to make me scared she would die soon. i hope she survive a couple of years because she means everything for me, ive been offered free trips to many different places in the world by my family but if my dog cant come with me then i wont go. so the dog is always around me 24/7 so i cant imagine how it would be without her. So thanks for the answears then i should not need to worry and hope that she survives until summer and longer because ive bough alot of camping equipment on sale during winter so i have big plans for the dog in summer.
 

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WHEN they grey is a very random thing, in breeds & individuals.

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Different breeds & even different coat-colors, begin to grey at very different ages - black Greyhounds can have grey chins at just 3-YO, & by 5 the whole underjaw can be frosted, sometimes to the commissure [angle where lips meet at the rear of jaws].

What condition were her teeth in, when U adopted her? - how much tartar, tooth wear, browning, etc, can give a clue to a dog's age. Clearly she was an adult already, but she could have been 2, 5, who knows?
Did the vet guesstimate her age, at the time? // BCs who are kept lean & active can reach 14 to 16, easy. Is she spayed? - MAMMARY CANCER is a huge risk for intact-Fs; so is pyometra [life-threatening uterine infection].

Keeping her lean [rather than fit & trending to pudge] will extend her life, as will athletic & aerobic activity - swimming is especially good, but watch that she doesn't get overtired, as dogs DO NOT float! - when they tire & stop paddling, they SINK like rocks.
But swimming is cooling, supportive, avoids repetitive-stress injuries [running on paved surfaces is terrible for joints], & exercises the whole body, including heart / lungs.

If she's happy, active, has a bright eye & good appetite, i wouldn't worry about grey hair; some dogs grey very early, & it runs in lines as well as breeds. If her dam greyed early, odds-on she will, too. No big deal. :)

Can U post a photo, please? - we love to see other folks' dogs. :happydance:

- terry

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
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Different breeds & even different coat-colors, begin to grey at very different ages - black Greyhounds can have grey chins at just 3-YO, & by 5 the whole underjaw can be frosted, sometimes to the commissure [angle where lips meet at the rear of jaws].

What condition were her teeth in, when U adopted her? - how much tartar, tooth wear, browning, etc, can give a clue to a dog's age. Clearly she was an adult already, but she could have been 2, 5, who knows?
Did the vet guesstimate her age, at the time? // BCs who are kept lean & active can reach 14 to 16, easy. Is she spayed? - MAMMARY CANCER is a huge risk for intact-Fs; so is pyometra [life-threatening uterine infection].

Keeping her lean [rather than fit & trending to pudge] will extend her life, as will athletic & aerobic activity - swimming is especially good, but watch that she doesn't get overtired, as dogs DO NOT float! - when they tire & stop paddling, they SINK like rocks.
But swimming is cooling, supportive, avoids repetitive-stress injuries [running on paved surfaces is terrible for joints], & exercises the whole body, including heart / lungs.

If she's happy, active, has a bright eye & good appetite, i wouldn't worry about grey hair; some dogs grey very early, & it runs in lines as well as breeds. If her dam greyed early, odds-on she will, too. No big deal. :)

Can U post a photo, please? - we love to see other folks' dogs. :happydance:

- terry

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i adopted her from a dog center so she had been vaccined and sterilised. She doesnt allow me to brush her teeths or cut her nails so i take her to the vet to get her nails cut. but i give her 2 Dentastixs everyday that are supposed to work as a toothbrush for dogs. i recently moved away from the city and closer to the forest/mountain and ive always been a survival/camping person so i give the dog 2-3 hours walk everyday in the mountain, no matter weather even in the night. and no i didnt get much information about the dog when i adopted her. but i guess i could contact them again and ask.
 

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I know of dogs that have lived for many years with grey in their coats, and dogs that have passed with no grey. Since our dog is all white, if she is turning grey we would never know.
 

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Handsome!

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aw, she's a cutie! - Looks smart, too. :)

If she were mine, i'd try to take a little pudge off her - for a really good look at her body condition, get her wet, using a handheld shower if U have one, while she stands in the bathtub / shower enclosure.
Her ribs should be easily FELT under her haircoat & skin / thin muscle, with minimal pressure to distinguish the edges of each rib - they should be visible only when she's wet, & only the last one or 2 should be seen thru her wet coat.

her spine should be smooth, no bony dragon-spikes, but there should be a very clear line where her shoulder-blade runs at an angle, at the base of her neck toward her withers -
it should be clean & easily seen, not smoothed-over & not 'rounded' with fat.

When U look at her from the side, her belly behind the ribs should go UP until the line of her hindleg cuts off the view, & from above, her waist should be a pair of reverse parentheses ... )------( .... just in front of her rear legs / butt.

From behind, her neck should visibly & definitely taper toward her head, & from above, her shoulders should always be the widest part of her body.

If the grey that's worrying U is the line edging her mask, where brown / fawn meets white, that's very minimal, & i would be completely unconcerned - she looks to be something between 5 to maybe 8-YO, & barring a traumatic injury, contagious illness, or a hidden problem [kidneys, heart, cancer...], she should have some very good years left, IMO.

One good idea -
have her seen by the vet every 6-mos, even when she's "perfectly healthy", & ask for a full-body palpation, have her lungs ausculted, listen to her heart, get a blood-panel with kidney & liver values, etc.
That gives U early warning of sneaky things that could be worsening, like kidney function, so U can do something about them B4 they show overt symptoms. :thumbsup:

She looks like a very happy dog. Congratulations to U both. :)
- terry

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Discussion Starter #10
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aw, she's a cutie! - Looks smart, too. :)

If she were mine, i'd try to take a little pudge off her - for a really good look at her body condition, get her wet, using a handheld shower if U have one, while she stands in the bathtub / shower enclosure.
Her ribs should be easily FELT under her haircoat & skin / thin muscle, with minimal pressure to distinguish the edges of each rib - they should be visible only when she's wet, & only the last one or 2 should be seen thru her wet coat.

her spine should be smooth, no bony dragon-spikes, but there should be a very clear line where her shoulder-blade runs at an angle, at the base of her neck toward her withers -
it should be clean & easily seen, not smoothed-over & not 'rounded' with fat.

When U look at her from the side, her belly behind the ribs should go UP until the line of her hindleg cuts off the view, & from above, her waist should be a pair of reverse parentheses ... )------( .... just in front of her rear legs / butt.

From behind, her neck should visibly & definitely taper toward her head, & from above, her shoulders should always be the widest part of her body.

If the grey that's worrying U is the line edging her mask, where brown / fawn meets white, that's very minimal, & i would be completely unconcerned - she looks to be something between 5 to maybe 8-YO, & barring a traumatic injury, contagious illness, or a hidden problem [kidneys, heart, cancer...], she should have some very good years left, IMO.

One good idea -
have her seen by the vet every 6-mos, even when she's "perfectly healthy", & ask for a full-body palpation, have her lungs ausculted, listen to her heart, get a blood-panel with kidney & liver values, etc.
That gives U early warning of sneaky things that could be worsening, like kidney function, so U can do something about them B4 they show overt symptoms. :thumbsup:

She looks like a very happy dog. Congratulations to U both. :)
- terry

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Thanks for the hearthwarming answear it will lighten the anxiety of losing the dog sooner then i though i would, then the plans in summer for a week in the forest is still gonna happen. i will take the dog to make a health check and make sure everything is fine. Thanks everyone for the answears :huddle:
 

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My terrier mix, Shadow, started getting grey when he was around 4 or 5 years old. He was black with a little grey on his paws and the tips of his ears, but around that age I noticed the grey around his muzzle. The years slowly passed, and he would get a little more grey in his coat every year, by the time he passed away 12 years later I had had to change the description of his coat color at the vet from black, to black and grey because his chest, face and back end were just about solid grayish white.

Shadow was extremely active up until he had a stroke at the age of 15 years 10 months. He ran, played, and had a zest for life. So long as your dog is healthy, happy, active don't worry about grey hair! Zody, the dog I have now, that's him in my Avatar, will be 5 years old in a week, and this past year I noticed that he's beginning to get white around his mouth. It makes me a bit sad because it does mean he's no longer a young dog, but I know that he could very well live to be 17 like Shadow did, so I'm not too worried about it. He's healthy, happy, active, loves going on walks, runs, jumps, and plays, I doubt that he's going to pass away any time soon.
 

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Of course there can never be a guarantee for longevity for any living creature, including we humans too. The key is, good food, exercise, and regular medical exams, and prompt care when necessary. Though there still can be no guarantee, you certainly increase the odds that your beloved dog will live a long and healthy life. Those care items are good for us too.
 

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My lil guy with his BIG ears started turning gray when he was four months old. He’s now ten months old and his head, part of his face and his legs are gray with tan mixed in. Talk about weird coloring. Lol! I wonder what he’ll look like when he’s two or three?!😊
246849
 

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My lil guy with his BIG ears started turning gray when he was four months old. He’s now ten months old and his head, part of his face and his legs are gray with tan mixed in. Talk about weird coloring. Lol! I wonder what he’ll look like when he’s two or three?!😊 View attachment 246849
Isn’t that just the blue/silver grey color of the Yorkshire terriers/Silky terriers (whatever he is) coat? Not grey as in lack of pigment due to age.
 

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Isn’t that just the blue/silver grey color of the Yorkshire terriers/Silky terriers (whatever he is) coat? Not grey as in lack of pigment due to age.
Hoover is a Yorkie. I thought his light colored hair was “blue” too but yesterday I read on a Yorkie website the color is gray. The “blue” on a blue and gold Yorkie is the dark color (almost black). I don’t know. I’m confused. Lol! My last dog was a Yorkie but she was a black and tan. To her dying day (13 yrs old) she never changed to gray or white.
If anyone knows the real story please enlighten us!🙏🏼
 

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Hoover is a Yorkie. I thought his light colored hair was “blue” too but yesterday I read on a Yorkie website the color is gray. The “blue” on a blue and gold Yorkie is the dark color (almost black). I don’t know. I’m confused. Lol! My last dog was a Yorkie but she was a black and tan. To her dying day (13 yrs old) she never changed to gray or white.
If anyone knows the real story please enlighten us!🙏🏼
I believe that the correct term for that color still is blue. However the blue can vary from a dark steel blue color to a shiny silver (Like Hoover). So why he turned grey when he was 4 months simply was because of the color change that a yorkie goes through from puppy to adult. He didn’t turn grey due to pigment loss because of old age (which this thread is about). This is the normal process, the yorkie is much darker as a puppy and then shift into a different color when growing up. The color they turn into can be very dark but also as light and greyish/silver as yours.
 

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I believe that the correct term for that color still is blue. However the blue can vary from a dark steel blue color to a shiny silver (Like Hoover). So why he turned grey when he was 4 months simply was because of the color change that a yorkie goes through from puppy to adult. He didn’t turn grey due to pigment loss because of old age (which this thread is about). This is the normal process, the yorkie is much darker as a puppy and then shift into a different color when growing up. The color they turn into can be very dark but also as light and greyish/silver as yours.
Thanks for the explanation Sunflower! On one Yorkie website, they said basically what you just wrote. But on another website, they talked about the hair changing the color my Hoover’s has, is not “blue”, but grey. I like blue better. He’s only ten months old, much too young to be grey.☺
 

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I believe that the correct term for that color still is blue. However the blue can vary from a dark steel blue color to a shiny silver (Like Hoover). So why he turned grey when he was 4 months simply was because of the color change that a yorkie goes through from puppy to adult. He didn’t turn grey due to pigment loss because of old age (which this thread is about). This is the normal process, the yorkie is much darker as a puppy and then shift into a different color when growing up. The color they turn into can be very dark but also as light and greyish/silver as yours.
I guess I should get off this thread since it’s about puppers who actually turn gray. Thanks again Sunflower.🤍
 
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