Dog Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
my husband and i live alone with our pug mix we got from craigslist last year and in the last few months he's been biting at people. he bit 2 friends as they tried to pet him from the fence and he's been biting at pretty much anyone who comes over's feet when they leave. so far altogether i'd say he's bitten and at least grazed 3 people and drawn blood on 2 others, 1 so bad she had to go see her doctor the next day. he never tries to bite me or my husband. i need some stuff i could try at home to fix it asap because my landlord heard about the really bad bite and said if it happens again he has to go.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
A good muzzle would be an immediate start, it will protect you and the dog in the short term. It won't control the behavior but it will prevent him from laying teeth on people. Behavior will have to be worked on. Who is the dominant figure in the house at the moment? Probably the dog?

Tell us something about how you treat the dog, how the dog sees you... When the dog is stressed or upset, do you pick him up and coddle him?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
i'm not sure what you mean by dominant? we usually just let him run around and do whatever he wants to do, which is usually just sitting by one of us. he's very attached and affectionate with both of us, probably more so to my husband. we do pick him up and hold him when he's upset but just to try and stop him from barking and going berserk
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Get the dog muzzled at minimum when outside or when people are around for now. A large dog with a track record of aggression and multiple bites by now would be deemed dangerous and probably be destroyed. The fact that your dog is small and cute...

Others will chime in. It's late.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Do you have tried to rebuke your pug to stop biting people? Try using food reward way if your pug showing good behavior before people (who are your friends) then you reward food to your pug. Or you put your pug into a kennel while your friends come your home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
my dog is not big and vicious he doesn't need to be destroyed! and is a muzzle really that necessary because number 1 idk if they even make muzzles his size and number 2 wouldn't he get even more stressed. also very embarrassing to have such a small thing all strapped up like that i know some people would think im being abusive or mean. i can give him some treats when people come over but a kennel is out of the question that is our last resort when we both have to leave the house, he screams when he's put in there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Not a quick fix. You need to consult a behaviorist before you end up with a lawsuit. He has already bitten five people, luckily they were friends. A behaviorist can assess him in his environment and give you fed back on why this is happening and how to address it. https://iaabc.org/consultants
good luck to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
I'd definitifely recommend muzzle training and a behaviourist and/or reward-based working, violence-free trainer to evaluate the situation.
as long as you didn't solve the problem you need to manage your dog in a way that he is not a danger for your surroundings.

1. no one except you and your husband should directly interact in any way with the dog.
2. don't leave your dog unattended in an area where he coulde have contact with other people or animals

my dog is not big and vicious he doesn't need to be destroyed! and is a muzzle really that necessary because number 1 idk if they even make muzzles his size and number 2 wouldn't he get even more stressed. also very embarrassing to have such a small thing all strapped up like that i know some people would think im being abusive or mean. i can give him some treats when people come over but a kennel is out of the question that is our last resort when we both have to leave the house, he screams when he's put in there!
a dog that hurts people should be managed in a way that they can't continue to do so. unnecessarily of the size.
Your dog is at this point a dangerous dog and you need to handle him in a way that he isn't a danger for his surroundings.

Even a small dog can do permanent damage to a human. Don't take this lightly!
Dogs have teeth and these teeth can do damage to nerves and sinews regardless of their size.

One of my friends has still problems because he was bit in the foot by a yorkshire terrier when he was a child.

you can find muzzles for any size and breed. just one search in google and I had half a dozen Amazon and ebay link for muzzles for pugs. I'd measure snout length and circumference and hed size and then go to your local pet supply shop and ask.
I'm very sure it is a lot less embarrassing to let your dog wear a muzzle than to lose your dog because he hurt someone that reported you.

there are a lot of videos around how to get your dog used to the muzzle, so that he's not stressed by wearing it.
I don't say you should let him wear it all the time... just when you want him to be around other people. better safe than sorry.
 
  • Like
Reactions: annageckos

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
my dog is not big and vicious he doesn't need to be destroyed! and is a muzzle really that necessary because number 1 idk if they even make muzzles his size and number 2 wouldn't he get even more stressed. also very embarrassing to have such a small thing all strapped up like that i know some people would think im being abusive or mean. i can give him some treats when people come over but a kennel is out of the question that is our last resort when we both have to leave the house, he screams when he's put in there!
No one was saying your dog needs to be destroyed. Just that if it was a larger dog or different breed he would be deemed vicious and likely PTS. But if he is biting people he is dangerous and you need to figure out why and train and manage him. Many dogs that bit do so out of fear, but many people don't realize it. Muzzle training is a great idea. What is worse? Being embarrassed over having to muzzle your dog or having him taken away from you? You do what you have to, to keep your dog safe and also the public. I'd look into a behaviorist, not just a trainer. But stay away from anyone who talks about being alpha or dominance. It can make an already fearful dog worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
i can't afford dog trainers that's why I was asking for stuff to do at home. i will look for a muzzle and try to get him to wear it but are there videos on how to help with his aggression too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
i can't afford dog trainers that's why I was asking for stuff to do at home. i will look for a muzzle and try to get him to wear it but are there videos on how to help with his aggression too?
without knowing the exact situation it is difficult to help you find a specifial solution for you and your dog, but generally management is the most important thing and without having a professional look evaluate the situation, I wouldn't let him have contact with other people or animals.
After muzzle training I'd try to get him used to having people around that don't directly interact with him and use treats and games to keep his attention on you, so he doesn't need to pay attention to the other humans.
getting him to the point that he can tolerate strangers that don't directly interact with him,while wearing a muzzle and be relaxed is a good goal thata lot of dogs are able to reach in my opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: annageckos

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Think about whether you want to sell a few items/work overtime, make cuts elsewhere and solve this now, or pay someone $$$$ after a lawsuit because they got hurt. You will end up paying one way or another, at this stage you have a choice in the matter.

It is too late to say don't buy a dog if you can't afford basic training, but I am going to copy and paste from the sticky at the top of this section. These are not my words, but the words of the moderators.

If your dog’s behavior has escalated to the point of biting and drawing blood, the internet is not where you should be.It is the responsibility of the dog owner to prevent bites from happening and should your dog bite someone else you could be held civilly ($) and criminally (jail) responsible, and your dog may be euthanized. It is for the seriousness surrounding dog bites that we, The Dog Forum Team, will again make a judgment call and may close/remove/edit a thread once your dog has bitten someone, even yourself. Home interventions may have worked before the bite, but it is the general consensus that you find a professional trainer and/or behaviorist to help you solve the problem-BEFORE someone gets seriously hurt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
thank you mathilda that is very helpful. i will definitely try that. and this is beyond basic training so im a little offended by the last post im sorry i don't know anything about dogs and can't afford special trainers, i figured a forum about dogs was the next best place to ask you guys can delete all my posts and stuff if you want to i was just looking for some help.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Sounds like the dog tends to be a biter when it is not leashed ( through the fence and when people come over). I wonder if the dog exhibits the same behavior when you are out on a walk and meet people while the dog is on a lead? A muzzle will obviously stop the biting but likely will not cure the problem. I might put the dog on a lead when guests come over and keep control of the dog rather than letting the dog have its way and indulge its insecurities or territorial behavior resulting in biting. If the dog doesn't demonstrate the same behavior around other people while on a leash then I think you have a viable solution to cure the problem. This approach offers both components, management along with a means to teach the dog its behavior around outsiders is unacceptable. The fence biting scenario even with the dog muzzled will still allow the dog to act out its desires without the actual bite of course but runs the risk of amping up/frustrating the dog even more and perhaps making the situation worse. The only solution for the fence biting is you have to monitor the dog when outside as well as have control over the dog by having it on a lead.

The dog needs some order in its life, which it mostly has but when the occasional visitor shows up, it doesn't know your "rules" and defaults to its own "rules". Keeping your dog on a lead by your side in the situations where your dog is biting will accomplish this as the dog will learn, through your control, it does not need to be either so territorial or insecure etc.

More obedience and extended down stays by your side with guests in your place will show the dog your expectations and rules of conduct. Reward when appropriate and correct when appropriate and keep a keen eye on your dog looking for signals long before it escalates.

Another thought, when you know friends are coming over, meet them outside or in an area out of your home on a lead. Neutral areas have benefit when it comes to behavior like this at times. I also would have your guests enter your home first from the neutral area meet and greet. You and the dog should enter after them.

I agree with mathilda's comment " without knowing the exact situation it is difficult to help you find a specifial solution for you and your dog," My comments are based on a dog exhibiting territorial behavior and/or some insecurities whether it be aggression or fear based.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
wow that's awesome drivedog you know your stuff! we don't run into many people on our walks and he barks so they don't really come close enough for him to bite or anything so im not really sure. his fur always stands on end when he's in the yard or on leash and he sees somebody so i don't think that's good. all he really knows is sit so i'll try having him lay down when friends are over but he's hard to train like that, he ignores me a lot. very helpful reply thank you
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
wow that's awesome drivedog you know your stuff! we don't run into many people on our walks and he barks so they don't really come close enough for him to bite or anything so im not really sure. his fur always stands on end when he's in the yard or on leash and he sees somebody so i don't think that's good. all he really knows is sit so i'll try having him lay down when friends are over but he's hard to train like that, he ignores me a lot. very helpful reply thank you
Well, I was hopeful the dog might not display the same behavior while on lead but sounds like he would, given the chance. You're correct, the raising of hackles whether on leash or not makes this more of a challenge. Sounds like your dog needs some confidence around humans and there are many here who can give you good information regarding desensitizing and counter-conditioning for this situation. It certainly can be done, you just have to make the commitment to the process. Exposing your dog to the element which induces his reaction is multi-pronged and your mindset has to be 100% proper, no anxiety or trepidation, just pure calm and confidence. The key to this type of training is slowly exposing your dog to the element while the dog is well under threshold and just existing at an appropriate distance while the dog stays chill as the two of you interact appropriately. Nothing wrong with instantly rewarding the dog for keeping its cool as you conquer each step of the way. The idea is: something good happens instantly every time your dog sees a human. If you sense the dog is going to react, raise it's hackles and starts the barking and lunging, just go a different direction calmly. It takes time but the more small steps you make without the dog losing it, you are one step closer to the overall solution. Failures generally set you back two steps. The state of your mind during these exercises is a huge factor, if you are uptight it will make things worse. So none of that " uh oh..here comes a person and the dogs gonna lose it" on your behalf. Never reward the dog after it exhibits its hackle raising behavior in the presence of other humans even after turning around and going a different direction. Reward while the dog is keeping it together and try your best to work some additional obedience with your dog, no matter what it might be.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
I just wanted to add another thought. Since you answered my question regarding whether or not your dog displays the same behavior regardless whether it is leashed or not, which I believe is important info and very helpful in trying to give advice. I will once again cite mathilda's thought " without knowing the exact situation it is difficult to help you find a specifial solution for you and your dog," as it proved true with my first response. My first advice is worth what you paid for it, nothing. Yes, I might still use some of the same procedures I mentioned but none of my first response honed in on what seems to be your dog's most basic problem and that seems to be its reactivity toward humans excepting the two of you. While you control your dog from biting whether it be a muzzle or on a lead under your control, you need to tackle the underlying problem which probably stems from a lacking in socialization as a pup.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
First of all, you need to understand that the size of a mouth or the dog doesn't matter, a bite is a bite, vicious is vicious - and you need to stop making excuses. There's no easy way to say that. Small dog owners are known for protecting their dog physically, mentally, emotionally, verbally etc and that's where the problem lay. Many small dogs that I meet are fearful, or have zero confidence and they are made that way by the owners - hence what you have. They are cute, get away with alot more and tend to be coddled and protected. It appears you have a bully on your hands with no rules or limitations, a personal guard dog, resource guarding and you are the resource.

Our minpin is a little powerhouse, king of toys for a reason, they have the capability of being very vicious in the wrong hands. People meet him, they always ask "Is he really a minpin", they aren't used to a pin that is calm and easy going. We "respect" Jagger - respect that he is a dog. He is not a child, not a cat or a hamster - he is a dog, and we let him be "dog". We don't treat Jagger outside the realm of being a dog - we don't humanize him. Though he is spoiled, has run of the condo, sleeps in the bed, ample affection and love etc. He's very well balanced, very stable, very confident. Why am I saying this? Because he's also small, he's also very cute - but I won't make excuses for him. If he ever bit anyone, I'd be scared to death of the possible ramifications - the possibility of losing him or being sued.

Socialization is so important, dog park whenever possible - in your case, leash and a muzzle. We do not rescue our dog at any time (unless he's in serious danger), nor does he come to us for rescue anymore. At the park - we are very relaxed and it shows in the dog. He is a dog, he can work it out himself - dogs need to learn certain things from other dogs - hence the socialization. He gets dominant with some dogs, they knock him down a few pegs - and vice versa. This builds incredible confidence.

Every dog should have a personal place that is theirs alone, 4 walls and a roof. Jaggers kennel is his safe zone, his bedroom, stay out of it - we don't lock him in at any time. If he feels stressed in any way, he goes to the kennel. You come into my home, leave the dog alone if he's in the kennel, respect his space - he'll come out when he's ready.

Do get a muzzle for your dog, and do get him out in public - around other people and dogs. You need to relax, don't be nervous cause the dog will sense it and will react accordingly. Read and research online, you can make it happen but it's going to take time and alot of patience.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top