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I don't like the idea of not letting my little one get on the couches or bed, so I use fabric diapers when she has a heat, first time I did that she ended up with a "baby rash" she kept licking her vulva, and when I checked, it was darker, and had a black spot by the tip, so I thought she was getting necrotic, but my vet said there was nothing wrong, just advised to swap diapers more often, not let her lick herself and gave me a cream to use on her for a week

But every single time that she has had a heat since then, I swap the diapers 3 times a day, once in the morning, after her bathroom break, then once by midday and once before I go to bed, and she still gets that baby rash kind of irritation, she keeps trying to lick herself and i am taking her to the vet, but I know that she is going to repeat the same thing she said the last two times

Is there any recommendation you can give me to avoid or at least minimize her irritation when heat time is here? I really feel bad about not letting her do something she always do(lay down in the couch or bed) so I would love to avoid that but I also don't want her to be on pain every heat time
 

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Our girls are all entire and we have never considered spaying for convenience. If medically required I would obviously spay.
Most girls when they come into season do a lot of licking and cleaning which is all part of their hygiene, and I do not think they should be prevented from doing this.
It sounds like a form of nappy rash!
Our dogs are not designed to wear knickers and nappies and the whole area should be aloud to "breath" without restriction.

Creams can collect dirt and dust, and with nappies on your dog can not keep the area further cleaned !

Please let your girl keep herself clean without restriction.

Some girls are exceptionally clean and others are just lazy and can't be bothered with the mess.
We have a girl at the moment who has been in season for 6 days, it is hardly noticeable (not much blood and very little licking) .


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This is off topic, but I wanted to take a moment to address the website provided by @forgotten just to advise caution for readers who heed this site. Neutering does, in the end, come down to a number of factors, and it's ok to abstain, but I do hope no one decides not to neuter because they think it harmful. This simply isn't true. For some, whole dogs can be kept healthily, but for most cases that just isn't obtainable. Neutering should ALWAYS be on the table. It's not about convenience.

I've quoted the parts I thought most questionable:

  • "our stray population is minimal," - I can't think of a single country where the number of unwanted pets isn't an issue, nor is this a reasonable argument for not needing to neuter animals.
  • "neutering halts mental development," - I would like to see the studies which support this. Even if there is truth to it, it can be worked around by neutering at mature age.
  • "traditionally thought that permanently juvenile dogs made more compliant pets," - I don't think I've ever heard of this being a traditional method of thinking, but I could be wrong.
  • "but neither myself or Google could come up with a logical answer," - Because we all know how reliable Dr Google has been in the past. I could provide the answer the author was looking for, so I also question how hard they searched.
  • "Some vet practises offer discounts and encourage early neutering. I fear they may be thinking more about their pockets than the welfare of the animals under their care. And that’s very scary," - How is offering to neuter at a lower price lining their pockets? Yes, early neutering can cause issues, but the reason many vets push for it is to eliminate the risk of the animal getting pregnant by neutering before sexual maturity. Not ideal, but unfortunately the product of irresponsible owners.

One of the sources this site quotes is incredibly outdated from 2007, though I couldn't find the other one online to check it. As someone who has done more research investigations than she can care to count, credibility is important and this site just doesn't seem to have it.
 

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Oh my goodness, what a scary post!
🤣
Also happen to agree with you about spaying. Elective surgery whose main benefits are preventing pregnancy (also avoidable by being a responsible dog owner), convenience (yep, it's a bit of a mess to clean a couple times a year), and pyometra/uterine cancer (which can be resolved by spaying if and when they happen, as long as they're caught in time) has never seemed worth the increased risk of joint troubles (a known issue in the breeds I've owned), cancers (mostly aggressive and difficult to treat ones, too), and incontinence (a rather common side effect). But that's just my opinion - everyone has to make their own assessment of risk.
 

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🤣
Also happen to agree with you about spaying. Elective surgery whose main benefits are preventing pregnancy (also avoidable by being a responsible dog owner), convenience (yep, it's a bit of a mess to clean a couple times a year), and pyometra/uterine cancer (which can be resolved by spaying if and when they happen, as long as they're caught in time) has never seemed worth the increased risk of joint troubles (a known issue in the breeds I've owned), cancers (mostly aggressive and difficult to treat ones, too), and incontinence (a rather common side effect). But that's just my opinion - everyone has to make their own assessment of risk.
I think this is overly simplistic and quite frankly unrealistic to suggest that the average dog guardian has the skills or knowledge to keep an unaltered dog. I would think the number of dogs that die in shelters or for lack of homes and proper care, would be reason enough to encourage doing what needs to be done to 100% guarantee there are no more unwanted puppies/dogs added to the unfathomable numbers there are already.


Having spent some time in rescue, on the front lines and in shelters, it is truly disheartening to see dog owners discouraged (or shamed implied for) from making the decision to alter their dogs.
 

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I think this is overly simplistic and quite frankly unrealistic to suggest that the average dog guardian has the skills or knowledge to keep an unaltered dog. I would think the number of dogs that die in shelters or for lack of homes and proper care, would be reason enough to encourage doing what needs to be done to 100% guarantee there are no more unwanted puppies/dogs added to the unfathomable numbers there are already.


Having spent some time in rescue, on the front lines and in shelters, it is truly disheartening to see dog owners discouraged (or shamed implied for) from making the decision to alter their dogs.
I've only ever experienced reactions like yours - essentially implying that I'm an irresponsible person for failing to recognize the plight of shelter animals (which is nonsense - every single dog and cat I've shared my home with has been someone else's unwanted animal), and an irresponsible owner for not spaying (despite never having had a pregnant dog as a result). Where I live, it's such a foregone conclusion that everyone spays, that to do anything else is anathema.

As I said earlier, it's my opinion that it wasn't worth the risk with my animals, and everyone else should make their own assessment of risk. Depending on the breed and the owner's skill, spaying could be appropriate. In my case, the risks outweighed the benefits.
 
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