Dog Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay so Bella is a 7 month old mixed breed dog that I got at 9 weeks old ever since I got her she hates it outside and pulls constantly until she is out of breath trying to get inside. She will go potty outside and then want inside immediately. I have tried treats in which she ignores same with toys. In this video you can hear neighbors dog's barking. She does this behavior whether or not the dogs are barking. It doesn't matter it can be perfectly quiet and she still wants inside. If I were to let go of the leash she would have ran to the door. When I brought her inside she started coughing from pulling so hard. I would have made a longer video but thats as long as my phone would let me due to space. A trainer is NOT AN OPTION. None in my area plus I recently found out I need 1000$ by may for summer classes or I cannot graduate.

https://youtu.be/SehdDMkTYS8
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,911 Posts
Thanks for the video. Can you video a typical training session though? People will likely be able to better offer feedback and tips if we can see how you normally work with Bella on her fear of the outdoors. :)

It seemed to me that she may be somewhat sensitive to sound. If you haven't already incorporated the Listen to That game (version of Look at That game) into your training then I would start there. A training video is below.

Also I would back it way, way up as suggested in your other thread you created today. Training needs to start where she is comfy. So if inside at the door then so be it. Fun training games start there. Once happy and engaged take the game to the threshold or just outside for a few seconds and then right back in. As she become comfier right outside you can spend more time out there and eventually also venture further out. Do you know the Come and Get It game? Great for recall but can also be used to build confidence and help tackle fears.I think it would be great for creating some bravery in regards to venturong out the door and onto the porch and later the yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
I noticed she doesn't show any interest in sniffing around or the ground. Maybe you could just sit near the front door with a leash that lets her choose whether to be at the front door or outside a bit. put her dinner right at the door and gradually move it out so she is eating outside.

Also if she is pulling on the leash, do not let her, stand still or move the other direction, but I would suggest leash practice indoors first as she seems way too agitated outside to leash train.

Another thing I would suggest, is just rewarding her for attention, just for looking at you when you say her name, do this inside, then try it near the door, and so on. You cannot do anything with her in the state she is in the video, you need to get her attention before any kind of training can happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
I noticed one more thing, really important. When you spoke to her and said come on, she looked at you, that should be rewarded heavily.
Also the leash is way too long, keep it short, and keep her close to you, she is not ready for that much distance yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Bella reminds me soo much of when Riley was a puppy. He was extremely fearful of being outside and would pull like a maniac in the same way. I understand your frustration, I was also in uni/college and had to come home to this ball of pent of energy. Walking him was supposed to be my saving grace, a way to tire him out, socialize him etc. It didn't make sense to me, I had assumed all dogs loved walks. I rushed thinking he'd get used to it and it set him so far back. He went from loving children and being fine with people (thanks to his breeder) to being terrified of them. I had to learn the hard way to take things slow and understand/respect his feelings. However, once I did this, bit by bit I started seeing improvements. Now he's a complete spaz when he hears the word "walk" and has learned to deal with strange/scary things in his own way, without invoking that flight or fight response.

Throughout the threads you've posted you've received a lot of solid advice. If there hasn't been any signs of improvement then perhaps you need to back up a step. How solid is her basic obedience? Just basic or even trick training with her should strengthen your bond and give her the building blocks to begin to learn how to approach certain situations. How excited does she get inside when you guys are training? You want to make her as enthusiastic as possible so you can start turning conquering her fear of outdoors into a fun training exercise.

Is she scared of anything indoors? Since she feels comfortable inside, you should start counter-conditioning her to things inside. Again, this will let her know that facing her fears can be rewarding. With my dog, I found that teaching nose-touch targeting an amazing way to cc him to certain objects. For example, he was nervous of the yoga ball. I asked him to touch it. He looked at it. I rewarded. I repeated this until he was willing to take a step towards it. Rewarded again. Then he hinted at nosing it. Rewarded. Finally he touched it. Threw a party (rewarded). The next session he may or may not touch it on the first try but I repeated the process again. Now he will climb all over it without issue. I can post of video of one of our sessions if you'd like. Doing things like this may seem tedious and irrelevant but it really helps their overall confidence. If Bella's like Riley, she probably won't be ready for little games like this outside for sometime but until then it will have a passive effect.

I already suggested a way to make her feel comfortable outside in a previous thread so I won't repeat myself. However, and I know this was just a demonstration video, but I will repeat that, the minute she starts pulling back inside, you should let her. She needs to know that she can go back to her safe place whenever she wants. With Riley I was able to make running back inside a game. The minute he got scared and wanted to go back, I pretended to be super excited and ran back with him.

And while I hate to say this, but I think you need to be honest with yourself. If all you want is the stereotypical perfect dog, this is not the dog for you. She may be one day, and may not. Are you really willing to spend the rest of Bella's life working on her fear issues if you have to? You need to understand that there is no quick or easy fix here even with a trainer/behavourist. You might start making progress and then something as simple as a plastic bag flying by could easily put you back at square one. You might not be able to go on a pleasant, regular walk for years. You will need to be on high alert for things that may scare her and always be aware of your surroundings. You will be able to catch some things but some you will not. You will encounter people who just don't understand that your dog isn't friendly, or ask you dumb questions like whether your dog was an abused rescue. It's not easy but infinitely rewarding if you're willing to put the work in.

I don't mean to offend you, but I just think about how much work I had to put in with Riley to get him to the point he's at now (I mean my noise/motion sensitive guy is now so close to conquering the teeter!). And then on the flipside, I think of what a complete mess he could've turned out to be if I hadn't.

Why don't you start a detailed training/progress log on everything you've tried and what the results were? No one will judge you for making mistakes, we all have. And if your phone doesn't have enough space, why not delete the video you uploaded? That should free up plenty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
I'd like to state as well that there are a lot of people here who are interested in helping you. Maybe you could start a training thread in which you state in great detail what you've just done (and perhaps upload videos) and any questions or frustrations you may have. It would let others chime in and offer specific advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Using a harness to physically drag her around is a big problem. You've taken away all her control and idependence. Switch to a shorter leash, a flat buckle collar and go slowly. Use treats to coax her into moving, comfort her if she appears nervous/
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I use the harness because of the way she pulls she already coughs when I bring her in now. I usually don't drag her I only did that today to show how she acts if I try to walk her. If I were to use a collar she would cough worse. I don't want to damage her trachea
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
I use the harness because of the way she pulls she already coughs when I bring her in now. I usually don't drag her I only did that today to show how she acts if I try to walk her. If I were to use a collar she would cough worse. I don't want to damage her trachea
If you dropped the leash would she run away or just run to the house door? If she's a runner are there any large open fenced in areas you could take her?

I think you need to let her off the leash and play with her outside. Take her favorite treats, her favorite toys and don't pressure her. Let her build her own confidence slowly at her pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
Okay, I was just able to watch the video.

I think the advice that has been given is really very sound. She looks absolutely desperate. I would definitely start indoors, maybe next to the door, just giving lots of treats. Then start putting her harness on, give lots of treats, then remove.

Once she gets excited to just be *next* to the door, open it. Stay indoors, just sit and give her treats every single time she looks outside. Once she's happy there, INCH forward. Go sloooowly. Don't push her. Honestly, with my dog I figure better safe than sorry, so whenever we test out something that I know is going to be very hard for him - for example, today it was sniffing my uncle's shoe as he sat on the couch - I make sure to watch body language very closely and keep him from going too far.

For now, I'd make potty trips very quick. And like another poster said (sorry, I'm on my phone so I can't go check who it was!) when she wants to go in, let her go in. Not only does it do more harm than good to push her so far out of her comfort zone, she needs to learn that you will always, always keep her safe - which requires knowing when she's uncomfortable in the first place, respecting that, and finding the best possible way to make her feel secure.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes no matter where I am she would run to the house, No fenced in area's around. I was once three houses over, Not even in sight of the house My boyfriend let the leash go on accident and she ran to the front door.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
the funny thing is she gets excited when I mention lets go outside. She runs to the door and waits. but when she goes outside this is what she does after she goes potty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
I disagree that a harness shouldn't be used, I think it's the safest for a puller starting out and pressure on her neck may restrict her air and make her even more panicked. They're also easier to slip from than a harness and she clearly wants to get away.

I also don't think you should let her loose in a fenced area yet. Other than a backyard, which she may already be used to if you have one as it's a neutral area, the first thing that pops to mind is a dog park and that's a HORRIBLE place for her right now.

I think you should just sit with her in the yard on the ground and feed her treats while you do. Let her get used to the new sounds and smells and sit with her for 10-15 minutes. Repeat until she's comfortable sitting in the grass (this could take days) and then begin moving farther from the house and continue praising.

I agree with @kmes that she seemed sensitive to sounds. She cowered when other dogs barked, and I think she needs to get used to all of the new scary stimulus coming at her. Indoors is constant and calm, outdoors is a whirlwind of new things and she seems to just be sensitive to stimulus.

Fear takes time to change, so it will likely be a long process. Just be patient with her. When she looks at you when you call her name or tell her to come on like you did in the video, praise HEAVILY! That's an excellent sign. Offer high value treats and speak to her calmly and assuringly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Yes no matter where I am she would run to the house, No fenced in area's around. I was once three houses over, Not even in sight of the house My boyfriend let the leash go on accident and she ran to the front door.
Well if she'll only go to the house then you don't even need a fenced area. Take some toys and treats outside and maybe some reading material for you. Drop the leash and when she runs back to the house, follow her but don't go up to the door. Instead sit at the edge of the steps or some other place about 10 ft away. Take out her toys and treats but don't call her over. Just sit and wait for her to come to you. It could take some time hence the reading material. When she comes over, let her play with her toys, and hang out with you for half an hour or so.

Repeat this whenever you have time while increasing the distance away from the front door. The key here is not having her leashed and letting her come to you of her own accord. Right now, she wants to be inside with you, which is why she acts that way. Almost certainly if given the choice between being alone next to the door or with you a few feet away from the door she'll choose to be with you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I have actually tried that. I will sit a distance from the door, she will run to the door I will call her back in which she will come to me, but then she will run right back to the door. she won't stay with me longer then a second and then she goes back to the door..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Patience. Take a book. She waits at the door because she knows that it is the way into the house. She needs you to open the door to get in, if she sees that that is not happening my guess is she'll eventually make her way over to you on her own.

This is probably her thought process: Inside > Outside. With Human > Alone. Right now those two preferences interact like this Inside with Human>Inside Alone> Outside with human>Outside alone.

You have to remove the possibility of "inside". That means not letting her in. Give it a try.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I usually don't let her in, not until she starts scratching at the door so she won't damage the door. I hooked her to the cable on the front porch to keep her from panicking and running off somewhere, and she can go on the porch as she wants she kept running up and down the steps whining scratching the door trying her best to get in just freaking out. her previous owner said she was not like this with them that she loved the outside and I didn't do anything different when I got her then they did. she just automatically hated it outside here even when it is quiet (we live on a road that doesn't have much traffic and when the neighbors dogs are inside it's really silent around and yet she is still scared. All her problems started the day I brought her home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,901 Posts
I honestly wouldn't leave her outside. She's scared, and forcing her to face her fear will both backfire and damage your relationship because you suddenly won't keep her safe. She needs to believe you will keep her safe.

I'd stick with very quick potty breaks and otherwise don't ask her to be outside all the time. Play the mentioned games, where she feels safe at first (so in the doorway).

Your #1 priority is to keep her feeling safe. #2 is slooooowly asking her to step out of her comfort zone and then making it incredibly rewarding to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
I honestly wouldn't leave her outside. She's scared, and forcing her to face her fear will both backfire and damage your relationship because you suddenly won't keep her safe. She needs to believe you will keep her safe.
Forcing her to face her fear while protecting her doesn't mean that you're no longer someone who keeps her safe. To the contrary. She's fearful because she thinks something bad will happen, if you show her that nothing bad actually happens from being outside (which is why its important to control the situation) then her fear will most likely lessen.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top