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I already booked an appointment to see the vet(new vet since I moved) on Saturday but i'm just wondering on what to expect when I see the vet. Like what kinda test I should be expecting that they are gonna do on my dog, would they put her on anesthesia to cut out her lump? x-ray? blood work? stuff like that. And also can they give vaccination after they give dog anesthesia since her vaccination are also due?
 

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They may biopsy the lump(s) depending on where in the dermis, or below, and how they otherwise might present. It's likely, especially with a lump on an eyelid, that there will be sedation to have it removed, again, depending on what their preliminary findings might be.

One thing I can definitely tell you; DO NOT permit vaccination at this time. Your dog is suffering from some condition and this is absolutely NOT the time to be injecting a vaccine into a likely compromised immune system that is trying to battle something else. Wait until treatment is complete and your dog has healed, and then wait a few more weeks.

Also, and this is a hotly debated topic on these forums and elsewhere, but I'm firmly of the opinion that "booster" shots are unnecessary. Just as humans don't get vaccine shots every year, dogs and cats do not need them either. Consider a titer test to check for immunity levels once a year. Here's a helpful chart from Prevention:

 

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One of our dogs had a small lump on her eyelid and had to have it removed. She was knocked out and they actually had to cut a part of her lid out and stitch it back together so it looks like her one eye is slightly smaller now! Our other dog has a lump but as it is not causing a problem the vet is happy to leave it alone.

Lumps on the body can vary. Some need removing but the vet only needs a quick feel to determine whether it is just a fatty deposit or if it needs checking out.
 

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Note that most veterinarians do not follow the above Parvo vaccine schedule and prefer vaccinating for parvo and distemper at 8,12 and 16 weeks, that last date being the most important as far too many puppies still end up with parvo if not given their last vaccines at or after 16 weeks. Still a mystery why this earlier vaccine schedule is still published so often. The first yearly booster is also important as without it, we still see adult dogs with parvo (rare, but they occur, often with disastrous results). As for the following boosters, that will be a debatable topic until research is finally done proving (or disproving) that dogs need these later in life. I think it will end up being an individual case thing, should vaccine titer testing ever become cheap and easy enough to do in a clinic setting. The problem with vaccine titers is that they don't necessarily reflect full immunity, just humoral immunity (not cellular- no way to 'titer' that situation). In people, vaccine boosters ARE given when the risk of infection is great enough (every time I travel overseas I get a booster for this or that disease) and never heard of a person having a vaccine titer done, except for rabies.

As for giving vaccines the day of a surgery- which is frankly done very routinely by most veterinarians- if it is an unwise procedure is also debatable, unfortunately with NO factual evidence to prove anything one way or the other (something I hope will change in the near future).
 

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As for giving vaccines the day of a surgery- which is frankly done very routinely by most veterinarians- if it is an unwise procedure is also debatable, unfortunately with NO factual evidence to prove anything one way or the other (something I hope will change in the near future).
Wouldn't you agree that it's logical to not overload an already compromised immune system that is already stressed trying to fight something off, by introducing even MORE foreign bodies for it to fight off?

From my own personal experience, I will NEVER do that again. My Spicey's skin infection drug out for FOUR MONTHS and cost me over $1K in meds and vet bills. Here's another heartbreaking thread where the owner's dog actually died.

Here's an even more compelling blog article from a vet who makes the issue pretty clear (bold or underlined sections by me):

Vaccinating Sick Pets
Here's a common scenario that many vets face. A pet comes in for an illness. Sometimes it may be for something relatively minor like a skin or ear infection. But more likely it will be a potentially serious problem such as profuse vomiting, not eating, being extremely lethargic, and so on. Chances are good that this problem has been going on for a while, and it seems that these cases happen in pets that rarely get veterinary care. So there we are with a pet that might have a very serious illness when the next question comes up.

"Hey, doc. While we're here could you give him his shots?"

Sometimes I can't completely understand some people. Their pet is sick and I'm talking about having to do a battery of tests to determine if it may be life-threatening. Yet they seem more concerned about the fact that they haven't brought this pet to a vet for vaccinations in a few years. These people seem to find the lapsed vaccines a greater concern than the illness that just happened to motivate them to come through our doors. So let's have a little lesson in immunology.

The immune system in a living creature is a truly remarkable and complex thing. When an animal or person becomes sick there is a cascade of events and chemicals within the body as the organism tries to correct or heal the illness. Antibodies may be produced, inflammatory mediators are released, white blood cells are released from the bone marrow, blood vessels become leaky, and many other things can happen. All of this is a normal response whether it's due to an injury or infectious disease. However, this normal response can lead to adverse effects on the body depending on the severity of the response. The immune system is also not limitless. There are only so many white blood cells that can be produced at one time. There are only so many resources the body has. And there is only so much a body can take at one time.

This is where vaccines come into the picture. When we give immunizations, we are stimulating the immune system to have many of the above effects. However, if the immune system is already "busy" trying to fight off another problem, it may not respond properly to the vaccine. This might mean that the body doesn't develop proper immunity and the shot ends up being worthless. Or, the stress of this secondary response on the immune system may make it harder to fight off the primary infection.

Put simply, we don't vaccinate seriously ill pets or people. It's simply not a good idea. A minor, local illness (such as an ear infection or small wound) isn't a big deal and we can still immunize. But vets aren't going to do this if there is a serious or wide-spread problem.

So the next time you take your pet to the vet for an illness, please don't ask them to vaccinate him or her until the problem is corrected. And make sure to visit your vet regularly so that you don't get behind on vaccines and physical exams to put you in this situation.
 
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