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I'm trying to train my dog to hold his paw up for more than a second but he's not quite understanding it. If I mark the longer holds and not the shorter ones, he starts violently scratching at me, growling or whining, trying to lie down, etc. I know that signs of frustration means time for a break, but I try to get at least ONE more one longish paw hold before stopping. Mind you, he is getting frustrated less than a minute into this exercise. He learned other things and enjoyed them, but I don't think he's quite understanding this one yet. I've been following this video for instruction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leo-9ZVkO7w
He recently learned roll over, and "get the tv remote" without frustration. He will try to do regular obedience commands when he doesn't understand and usually alternates between sit and down lol
I am just asking for ways to keep him from being frustrated and maybe a different approach? thanks!
 

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I'm trying to train my dog to hold his paw up for more than a second but he's not quite understanding it. If I mark the longer holds and not the shorter ones, he starts violently scratching at me, growling or whining, trying to lie down, etc. I know that signs of frustration means time for a break, but I try to get at least ONE more one longish paw hold before stopping. Mind you, he is getting frustrated less than a minute into this exercise. He learned other things and enjoyed them, but I don't think he's quite understanding this one yet. I've been following this video for instruction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leo-9ZVkO7w
He recently learned roll over, and "get the tv remote" without frustration. He will try to do regular obedience commands when he doesn't understand and usually alternates between sit and down lol
I am just asking for ways to keep him from being frustrated and maybe a different approach? thanks!
Do you use a "bridge" when teaching duration?

Whenever I teach a more difficult behavior, I alternate between the new (more difficult) behavior and some easy behaviors the dog can get easily rewarded for. For example, in a 1-2 minute session, we spend 10 seconds on the new behavior, 15 seconds on easy stuff, then back to more difficult behavior for 15 seconds, then more easy stuff. It keeps the engagement up and minimizes frustration. :)
 

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Ping pong your duration.
You should have a bracket or range of time he can hold his paw up. Cue the paw lift and sometimes asking for a longer time, sometimes a mid range, and sometimes an easy duration. As he gets better both ends of your range can be bumped up.

Another option would be using a target (could be paw physically touching the target or also reaching towards a target but not touching) to build muscle memory/strength if needed and to get some duration.
 

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My girl also very quickly gets frustrated when doing shaping exercises, and sometimes will throw fits when I raise criteria to the point we have to start the exercise from scratch. You gotta love those personalities, lol.

Some of this has been said, but I'll repeat it anyways. With my pup, I find things that help are:
- Using targets to build muscle strength and muscle memory for things that require her to move in a way she doesn't normally. I'm planning to use a target to teach a raise paw, and am using a sort of hand/finger target for "Sit Pretty" and for standing up on her back legs.
- when I'm raising criteria, jackpot the things that I really like (successfully holding a position for longer, for example) and give a smaller reward for the things that have been right in the past but are no longer what I want, she's more likely to offer the thing that gets her a larger reward vs the thing she only gets 1 treat for.
- Raise criteria painfully slowly, always moving backwards when I start to notice confusion. She definitely cannot do a sustained session where I'm continuously raising criteria, so with "Sit Pretty" as an example, its hold it for 1 full second, and then a few repetitions of he getting just getting into positions, hold it for 1 second, then 5 repetitions of just moving into the position, and repeat.
- keep sessions VERY short. I usually do 2-5min sessions for brand new tricks, spread through the day. Every time I start a new session, I start by asking for what she was doing well the last session, whether that mean I have raised my criteria or not.
- alternating between the new position(s) and very easy commands like spin or down or sit.
 
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