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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone, I posted earlier about the puppy blues, but me and my 14 week old GSD puppy Leo have made it to the other side!

I am having one problem right now though. I have a 7 year old chow chow and she really dislikes the puppy. This was the LAST thing I expected! Sophie (my chow) usually loves other dogs. She loves playing with them, and she loved to be goofy with them. I even introduced her to little dogs beforehand so she would be prepared for a puppy. She is even good with cats!

But, she can't stand the puppy. I understand why, Leo is rather annoying towards her. He tries to jump on her head and attempts to bite her snout, but Sophie basically has zero tolerance for him. If he jumps on her she either tries to run away, or she growls and snaps at him which kind of scares me.

So far Leo and Sophie are being kept separate, but is there anything I can do to teach Leo to be better behaved around Sophie? She's usually a really tolerant dog, so I feel confused by her behavior.:ponder:
 

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OMG, that picture with his tongue sticking out is adorable! I don't have any advice to offer, but had to comment on his picture. :)
 

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You can allow the older dog to teach the younger one. The snapping and growling is simply the older dog saying to the younger ( back off ) If the older dog is not biting and trying to draw blood I would allow the older dog to teach the younger one not to push to far.
 

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Puppies are pests. It is entirely appropriate for the older dog to get up and leave. Some people seem to think growling is bad, but that's how a dog says to another dog 'leave me alone, get out of my space'. Following up with a snap is also reasonable (especially when the infraction is the pup biting the adult dog)

After being bitten by a playing pup, the adult dog standing up and attacking with a vengeance is not acceptable. Growling at a pup who bounces up playfully is okay, snapping at a pup who bounces up playfully is not. It's all about the dog acting proportionally to the pup's behavior.

I'd also suggest you put effort into making sure the older dog and you have some alone time every day together, at least an hour. Also, make sure your older dog has some alone time away from the puppy, just by himself. Ideally there would be areas of the house where the older dog is allowed to go into but the younger dog is barred from. If you have an upstairs, it can be useful to divide the house as the lower half for the pup only and the older dog can access the whole house. Just set up a baby gate at the stairs, and when the older dog comes to it you always go and let him through, but the young dog stays downstairs (if he sleeps upstairs, only bring him up at bedtime)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
gracie: thank you! He's a little ham for photos.

Akodo: I've been working on trying to spend more time with Sophie, but I think she definitely could use more alone time. I live in a one story, but the puppy is gated off in a separate room.

today I was walking Leo through Sophie's area to go outside. He playfully jumped up on her, and she responded by viciously trying to bite him. She seems to have a zero tolerance policy for him. I don't know if there's a way to teach her to be less aggressive? When the puppy gets older will she still be mean towards him?
 

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Your puppy is in human terms being an obnoxious little brat, she's not being mean to him. If she hasn't actually bit him yet she's not viciously trying, she would have succeeded. Loud angry noises and teeth, if there's no contact and especially no wounds, is still her telling him to stop being obnoxious. She tried growling, the equivalent of a stern "No!" to a dog. She tried snapping, a louder "No!". He's STILL jumping on her so now she's yelling at him - a loud angry snarl and more snapping. Possibly even physically bowling him over and standing over him. "NO!!"

It's kind of like how you might feel after a kid keeps literally jumping on you. She's not a young dog either, she's creeping into her senionr years and here's this annoying little hairball jumping on her and chewing on her. Your best angle of attack for this might be restraining your pup, not your older dog. Keep him on a lead and don't allow him to jump on her, praise and treat if he's calm in her presence and not trying to harass her.

We feel bad for the puppy, but the puppy isn't learning his boundaries. Make sure SHE has the run of the house and the puppy doesn't. Give her praise and treats too when she's calm and relaxed, but not while the puppy is trying to jump on her. The pup is being rude and she doesn't need to learn to be more tolerant of it any more than you'd expect your grandmother to be tolerant of an 8 year old jumping on her and swatting her and climbing on her.
 

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I agree with @Redwood. If he had jumped on her, they were close enough together she could have done some real damage, but she didn't. Even if you were right there, dogs are WAY too fast, it happens in the blink of an eye. He is just not getting she doesn't like being jumped on.
Levi was the same way with my in-law's friends. They have a 14 year old Golden named Riley. Riley never had much patience with dogs anyway, and significantly less now that he is an older gent. Levi would try to engage in play, and Riley would have none of it. It was very interesting to watch. Riley would start off baring teeth. Then he started growling. Then a small snap. Then a very loud snap/growl, and kind of "charging" into Levi. Levi was never hurt, and it hasn't soured his relationship to other dogs. He was learning some valuable lessons.
 

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When I got Kris, my Doberman, at 11 weeks, Remmy, my Shih Tzu x Maltese, was the policeman. If Kris used her feet or jumped on him he would fly at her growling and have her down on the ground. He never left a mark on her but she sure learned to respect him. I never corrected him when he went after her and they get along great now and she is good with my other little dogs because if they yelp, Remmy is right there to straighten her out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone. It seems like I should let Sophie correct the puppy, even if it does look a little scary.

I always have the puppy on a leash, when he jumps on her it's usually because she comes over to explore and then he lunges.

would it be a good idea to possibly let them loose in the yard together and supervise them? Or should I continue to keep Leo on the leash and let Sophie come over? What's the safest environment for them to interact so that Sophie can properly correct him and hopefully no one can get hurt?
 

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I would just let the puppy drag the leash and let them explore. If the puppy gets in trouble you can grab the leash and pull the pup out of danger. You don't want to have to get between them because then you might get bitten. Remember their skin is really thick and it takes a lot more to damage their skin then it does ours. The more you get between them the more they will think something is wrong. Try and stand back and really look at the body language of the dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Just had them play together. Leo kept jumping on Sophie and she responded with some loud snarls and snaps. I'll admit I was a little worried, but she didn't bite him. I would take this to mean that she isn't trying to hurt him, as she had ample opportunity to bite if she wanted to. Leo finally seemed to get the message that she didn't like the jumping and ran away. So I think it was a good learning experience for him.
 

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Sounds like the little one got the message. Good job standing back and watching. It can be nerve racking but it will happen less and less as the pup learns how to behave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I definitely see how interaction helps them. I've also been bringing Leo to puppy classes, and I think that it is helping him pick up on cues.
 

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It hasn't really been all that long yet.. not even a little, but have you spotted any changes so far in his rambunctiousness around your chowlady?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's funny that you asked that! There has been a huge difference!

Leo and Sophie are actually playing together now, and doing well. Sophie knocks him down when he gets to rowdy, but Leo is acting much more submissively towards her. He backs off when she growls, and he hasn't been trying to jump on her head anymore.
 
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