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I am heart broken. Our 14.5 year old male Husky broke his left rear leg Saturday evening and the vet suggested the best thing we could do was to put him out of his misery and put him to sleep as he felt the leg would not heel due to his age. While I am grateful that he came in well after hours and met us at the clinic to evaluate our dogs condition, I cannot stop thinking that I made a mistake in taking his advice on putting our dog down.

We have owned several dogs for twenty plus years, however we have never been faced with any of them breaking any of their bones, especially a rear hip bone. Has anyone else had any experience with this? I know I cannot change anything now as he is gone, however if I made a terrible mistake in acting on our vets advice I would like to know as I never do it again.

Maybe I should have taken the dog back home and waited until I could have gotten a second opinion on Monday morning however I did not want him to suffer through what would have been at least 40 hours until we could have him looked at by someone else.

I am just so distraught and cannot stop thinking I may have made a terrible mistake.

Jakesdad
 

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The only thing I can offer, is that under a great deal of stress and anxiety, you followed a professionals advice. We depend on our Vets to guide and advise us as to how to best care for our beloved pets. You did everything correctly, and as heartbreaking as the outcome may be, don't second guess now. At 14.5 years, your dog lived a full and long life, thanks to years of your loving care. You made the only possible decision under the circumstances. Your memories of Jake are forever, cherish those memories.
 

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Laco said it very well.

I'd add that waiting wasn't a good option. Being in severe pain and unable to move, due to the possibility of further injury, would have been very hard on the dog.
 

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I am heart broken. Our 14.5 year old male Husky broke his left rear leg Saturday evening and the vet suggested the best thing we could do was to put him out of his misery and put him to sleep as he felt the leg would not heel due to his age. While I am grateful that he came in well after hours and met us at the clinic to evaluate our dogs condition, I cannot stop thinking that I made a mistake in taking his advice on putting our dog down.

We have owned several dogs for twenty plus years, however we have never been faced with any of them breaking any of their bones, especially a rear hip bone. Has anyone else had any experience with this? I know I cannot change anything now as he is gone, however if I made a terrible mistake in acting on our vets advice I would like to know as I never do it again.

Maybe I should have taken the dog back home and waited until I could have gotten a second opinion on Monday morning however I did not want him to suffer through what would have been at least 40 hours until we could have him looked at by someone else.

I am just so distraught and cannot stop thinking I may have made a terrible mistake.

Jakesdad
So sorry to hear of your loss, it must be heartbreaking for you, but I think you did the right thing in following the vets advice. Having a much loved pet put to sleep is one of the hardest things you can ever do, but you've put your dog's needs before your own, as any responsible dog owner would. Of course you will think 'maybe this or that' - it's inevitable. Just remember you did your best for all the years you had him and he's out of his pain now.

Lynsey
 

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Laco, Chas and Lynsey

Thank you for your responses and reassurance.

Yes, Jake had a great 14.5 years. He had a fenced in yard to play in, and could come and go in and out of our house as he saw fit because of the dog door we installed. Not to mention his great little play pal Marley who thought he was an indestructible play toy. The two of them would romp about loving life and each others companionship.

It will take some time to heal and eventually we will find Marley another furry buddy to play with.

Thanks again, Jakesdad
 

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You are mourning, so sorry. At 14.5 years, recovery, if ever, would be long and hard and confusing with possible complications or other serious health problems jumping right in. So while you may hear of, and see three-legged dogs leading wonderful lives, it is so very different than what an old dog would go through.
Sorry this happened. If you ever feel up to posting pictures of the good old days, please do share. Glad to hear you gave him beautiful happy years.
 

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I'm so sorry you had to go through that, it must have been heart breaking.

Please don't second guess yourself. Following the vets advise was the best you could do in a high stress situation. Honestly, a 14.5 husky probably would struggle to heal from a break, let alone a major break like a femur break. It would have caused a lot of long term pain for the dog and his quality of life would have suffered. As hard as it is to go through day to day without him, imagine how hard it would be to watch him in constant pain. The choice to put a dog to sleep is never an easy one, but in most cases it's the humane one.

Try to remind yourself of all the wonderful memories you have with Jake. It sounds like he lived a wonderful life.
 

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My heart goes out to you, I've been in a situation where my boy died at 10. It's painful, but as others have said, you followed your Vet's advice.

You showed how much you loved your pup by doing the kindest act we can give them, not to let them suffer needlessly.

Remember, when the pain hits your heart, it's your pup wagging it's tail saying "thank you for a wonderful life".

Sorry for your great loss.














'
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You are mourning, so sorry. At 14.5 years, recovery, if ever, would be long and hard and confusing with possible complications or other serious health problems jumping right in. So while you may hear of, and see three-legged dogs leading wonderful lives, it is so very different than what an old dog would go through.
Sorry this happened. If you ever feel up to posting pictures of the good old days, please do share. Glad to hear you gave him beautiful happy years.
Here are a few pictures from the good old days when we first adopted Jake.
He was the fastest dog I have ever seen. Half of his early pictures are just a blur.
 

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He sure was a beauty. Cherish those memories. Thanks for sharing, and you obvious made him a very happy dog for many years (I was going to say long, but their time with us is always too short).
 

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So sorry for your loss. He looked a bundle of joy and full of character.

It is a heartbreaking decision but I am sure you made the correct one. Making that decision is the hardest thing we do as pet parents, in my experience, but protecting them from suffering is the deal we must make when we take on responsibility for any pet. Your vet came in after hours because it was in Jake's best interests for him to be evaluated quickly. Based on that alone, I believe the recommendation your vet gave you would also have been in his best interests.
 

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I am so sorry that you had to go through this experience. So, lets see if we can find a silver lining to this that might help you or someone else in the future. To answer your question as to whether this should or should not have been done is impossible because there is no correct answer. I could give you a list of ten reasons why you made the correct choice and then give you another ten reasons why you did not. The lesson here is to not make decisions during emotional reactions. Not to give a lecture on brain neurophysiology but to use a metaphor: Imagine that a bear jumps out while you are walking down the path and you and your friend are running for your life (major fight or flight reaction which is the same as your emotional reaction) and someone asking you "Hey, what do you want to do to solve that problem at work?" The brain cannot make objective decisions during survival mode. I tell my clients to go home and take some time and when the emotions clear, and they are able to objectively discuss the problem, then let me know. That might look like yes, lets do this or that or maybe lets get a second opinion. Hope this helps. Remember, you did NOT make a mistake.
 

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It's understandable to second-guess yourself after a decision like that. You did the right thing. But I personally believe that what you are feeling is very normal. I felt like that after I had my cat put to sleep. I knew it was the right thing to do, but at the same time I started to doubt myself. But as the years go by I remember I did what was best for her.

Your Jake is absolutely beautiful. Huskies are amazing animals and they have a way about them that no other dog has. I had a grey one named Shadow a handful of years ago. She liked to howl to the fire alarm. There are no other breeds that are quite like a husky!
 
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