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Hi,
I recently came across a body condition scoring sheet for dogs, and I thought it might be helpful to have on here. Here it is.



Since weight is the most common problem in dogs, I recommend you check your dog regularly.

I hope this helps!
 

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Nola's between thin and ideal.
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Nice chart! Katie is between 2 & 3. Her ribs and especially her spine are very easily palpable, but her hip bones are noticeable (very much so the week after grooming). Her vet is happy with her condition and just said we can be free with treats and extra food (for now...we'll see what happens as she gets older).
 

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Our clinic keeps these in all of the exam rooms, too. You'd be surprised how many people have no concept of what good body condition in animals is. (Actually, many of our members here wouldn't be surprised....)
 

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Our clinic keeps these in all of the exam rooms, too. You'd be surprised how many people have no concept of what good body condition in animals is. (Actually, many of our members here wouldn't be surprised....)
No, not surprised. There was a lab on our walk the other day and the poor guy was barely walking- he was SO overweight. When Nyla and him were greeting eachother, she was kind of excited but all he could do is wag his tail. His owner was talking to me saying that he's not very energetic like her. Umm... I wonder why!!!!! He looked 40lb over weight!
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Nice chart! I learned a different way since my dog is very fluffy. You basically use the feel of your fist in comparison to your dog's rib. If their ribs feel like the: Back of your hand- chubby, Knuckles- too thin, Fingers- just right :)
 

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Nola's condition:


 

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No, not surprised. There was a lab on our walk the other day and the poor guy was barely walking- he was SO overweight. When Nyla and him were greeting eachother, she was kind of excited but all he could do is wag his tail. His owner was talking to me saying that he's not very energetic like her. Umm... I wonder why!!!!! He looked 40lb over weight!
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I agree, it bugs me so much when there are heavy labs. I own a labrador retriever who is in perfect condition according to this sheet, and I don't like the way that fat has become the norm for labs. Whenever anyone sees my lab they say she's skinny and give me a sideways glance. It makes me very exasperated that they appear to think I mistreat her/don't feed or exercise her right just because they have a fat lab. :eyeroll:
 

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Between 2-3. Ribs partly visible,more visible in movement,spine and hips are not. I rather like the conditioned or working dog weight myself. Aslong as they still have muscle and the basic body fat all dogs naturally have.
Most dogs I see are sadly overweight.
 

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I think people have forgotten that dogs are suppose to have waists, I was on the high street and I saw an old lady sitting outside a cafe feeding her barking overweight cavalier cake!!
 

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Cake?! Sugar is so bad for dogs, they don't process it nearly as easily as humans do. (And it's not that great for us, either.)

Kabota is 2, but that's deliberate. The vet wants him lean to keep the pressure off his bad hip. Visually he looks fat due to all his fluffy fur, so I use the feel method.
 

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Nice chart! I learned a different way since my dog is very fluffy. You basically use the feel of your fist in comparison to your dog's rib. If their ribs feel like the: Back of your hand- chubby, Knuckles- too thin, Fingers- just right :)
I use this method too!

At work I would say well over half of the dogs that come in are much too overweight. I kid you not, I have seen a 60 lb. (believe it was a little over 60) beagle!! It reminded me of a little tick, the poor thing. It had rolls on it's tail :( overweight labs are all too common as well.

The sad part for me is these people think they're keeping their dog happy by letting it stay inside and eat all the fancy treats they want (like some people would be) but they don't realize a dog would be much happier with a routine exercise program instead.
 

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I use this method too!

At work I would say well over half of the dogs that come in are much too overweight. I kid you not, I have seen a 60 lb. (believe it was a little over 60) beagle!! It reminded me of a little tick, the poor thing. It had rolls on it's tail :( overweight labs are all too common as well.

The sad part for me is these people think they're keeping their dog happy by letting it stay inside and eat all the fancy treats they want (like some people would be) but they don't realize a dog would be much happier with a routine exercise program instead.
I have seen one beagle in good shape in real life. I see him all the time, being walked. I think those two things may be connected.

I've never seen a lab in good condition irl, except for stringbean adolescents. Who then become ticklike adults.
 

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wow I didn't know beagles were known to get fat, I knew about the labs thought. My sister bragged about how muscular and fit her beagle is and he is gorgeous. She exercises him a lot.
 

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People keep telling me that Talos is thin, but I think he's perfect (and so does his vet). When I try to explain that large breed puppies must be kept lean so they don't have too much stress on their joints, I usually get confused looks and then "But I can see his little waist. Maybe more treats for such a cute puppy! I feed my dog burgers. Blah blah blah".

Silly people. -.-
 

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People keep telling me that Talos is thin, but I think he's perfect (and so does his vet). When I try to explain that large breed puppies must be kept lean so they don't have too much stress on their joints, I usually get confused looks and then "But I can see his little waist. Maybe more treats for such a cute puppy! I feed my dog burgers. Blah blah blah".

Silly people. -.-
You'd be so surprised the foods I see people bring their dogs at work!! SO many of them eat better than I do (and actual human food), I get a little jealous! Hahaha.
 

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I love the excuse, he's an older dog that's why he's getting fat. Uh no, it's quite possible to have an old dog and not have it fat, just adjust the food to it's energy level and exercise it even if that exercise is only a short walk or two.

Shadow's 17 years old and is between a 2 and 3. I keep him on the thin side because he is getting arthritis and it's slowly getting worse. He does still love his evening walk, he like to shuffle or trot (depends on how he's feeling) down the road and smell all the scents.
 
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