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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone, I think I'll start from the beginning.Mom had found a plate facedown on the floor, a pizza box empty, and Ginny licking the floor. Apparently, she had eaten about HALF A LARGE pizza, crust and all. Naturally, I'm quite worried. We haven't taken her to the vet yet, because it was late at night. My parents are convinced that she's gonna be fine, but she might be lactose intolerant. We don't know because she's a rescue. Anyways, Ginny was trained to not eat human food and she's only broken it once before now, a few weeks ago when she ate a burrito. What should we do? Is it a problem with her training or maybe the quality of her food? Thanks for reading and please leave an answer if you can.
 

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Most likely she'll be fine. I'd look out for a bad case of diarrhea, and pancreatitis since pizza can be greasy and fat can trigger pancreatitis.

Unless she starts acting like she really feels awful, or gets very sick, I'd not bother with the vet.
 
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Better Mgmt is crucial

it depends - what was ON the pizza?

ham, pepperoni, hot-peppers, "buffalo chicken", can all cause ferocious diarrhea & / or scald her anus - the spices go out, as well as go in.
Fat can cause pancreatitis, which is downright dangerous - that's a vet emergency, no matter what time it is, she's gotta GO, now.

Dogs are opportunistic eaters; no amount of "training", no matter how punitive / aversive or even highly-rewarding, will 100% eliminate all eating when chance offers food.
POLICE THE KITCHEN - don't leave stuff on the counter, on the table, etc.Use a baby-gate or the door to close the kitchen off when things are being prepped - keep the dog entirely out during big operations.

Don't leave accessible food anywhere in the house - office, living-rm, dng-rm, den, bedrooms, nowhere.
Put the meal U were eating INTO THE MICROWAVE or the [cold] OVEN, B4 answering a phone-call that will distract U, or answering the doorbell for a delivery.
Put something tempting atop the refrigerator, entirely out of reach - DEFROST the night B4, in the 'frig, instead of on the counter or in the sink.

Preventing the opportunities eliminates the problem - this is a human-training problem, not a dog issue. :)

- terry

 

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Dogs are opportunistic eaters; no amount of "training", no matter how punitive / aversive or even highly-rewarding, will 100% eliminate all eating when chance offers food.
I question this. I've known dogs that would ignore food that didn't belong to them, even if the food was on the floor right in front of the dog and the dog was unattended. I also know of service dogs that are trained to ignore/refuse food unless their handler specifically gives it to them with a release command. This is necessary for a few reasons. First, it prevent the dog from scarfing up food or crumbs while in down/stay under a table at a restaurant, for example, which would be considered conduct very unbecoming to a service dog and may even be grounds for the restaurant to request the dog be removed.

Second, it's also a safety consideration for the dog since there may be times when well meaning people or kids will toss "treats" to the dog that may or may not be good for the dog. If nothing else, doing such will distract the dog from the needs of the handler, so it's necessary to train the dog to ignore those types of things. Assuming the dog is well fed and not starving, I believe it is possible to teach a dog not to steal food it doesn't have permission to eat.

Preventing the opportunities eliminates the problem - this is a human-training problem, not a dog issue. :)
I very much agree with this. The only way to 100% prevent the dog from eating food it shouldn't is to make sure there's none in reach.
 

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I question this. I've known dogs that would ignore food that didn't belong to them, even if the food was on the floor right in front of the dog and the dog was unattended. I also know of service dogs that are trained to ignore/refuse food unless their handler specifically gives it to them with a release command. This is necessary for a few reasons. First, it prevent the dog from scarfing up food or crumbs while in down/stay under a table at a restaurant, for example, which would be considered conduct very unbecoming to a service dog and may even be grounds for the restaurant to request the dog be removed.

Second, it's also a safety consideration for the dog since there may be times when well meaning people or kids will toss "treats" to the dog that may or may not be good for the dog. If nothing else, doing such will distract the dog from the needs of the handler, so it's necessary to train the dog to ignore those types of things. Assuming the dog is well fed and not starving, I believe it is possible to teach a dog not to steal food it doesn't have permission to eat.
I completely agree with you. Dogs certainly can be trained to do exactly as you described.

To Emms,

I agree with JohnR and Rain that your dog will most likely be just fine but no harm in keeping an eye on her. Since it has been a day pretty much, is she doing okay?
 

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Train, yes; but don't rely on it entirely. MANAGE as much as possible.

I question this. I've known dogs that would ignore food that didn't belong to them, even if the food was on the floor right in front of the dog and the dog was unattended.
I also know of service dogs that are trained to ignore/refuse food unless their handler specifically gives it to them with a release command. This is necessary for a few reasons. First, it prevent the dog from scarfing up food or crumbs while in down/stay under a table at a restaurant, for example, which would be considered conduct very unbecoming to a service dog and may even be grounds for the restaurant to request the dog be removed.

Second, it's also a safety consideration for the dog since there may be times when well meaning people or kids will toss "treats" to the dog that may or may not be good for the dog. If nothing else, doing such will distract the dog from the needs of the handler, so it's necessary to train the dog to ignore those types of things. Assuming the dog is well fed and not starving, I believe it is possible to teach a dog not to steal food it doesn't have permission to eat.

...
I do not question the imperative of preventive training - only that training will result in 100% reliability in all circs.

An SD who's working is far-more likely to comply with a cue to leave-it than the same dog during off-hours, esp'ly when off leash - precisely that problem occurred with a Guide Dog who adored her off-leash time in a bayside scrubby area where the handler didn't worry about picking-up poop - [San Fran, Calif.]
a local resident remarked one afternoon, "boy, she sure loves the trash!", as he walked by.
Turned out her off-leash SD was a well-known / maybe notorious garbage-eater, which certainly helped explain her come-&-go diarrhea & sometimes foul breath. :rofl:
As a GSD, the vet just wrote it off as breed-typical occasional gastritis, & sometimes suggested an antacid; once she was on a long-line & away from the trashy scrublands, her runny days & stinky breath stopped.

I think the training IS important, valuable, & potentially life-saving - i just don't blame the dog if it fails / when it fails.
I might aim for 100% food-proof, but i won't hold my breath. :D

I've trained SDs - most were fine, under the handler's eye; some would rifle the home trashcan, looking for goodies, given the chance, IF THEY WERE ALONE IN THE ROOM.
Solution? - put the trashcan behind a latched door. Problem solved. ;)

- terry

 

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An SD who's working is far-more likely to comply with a cue to leave-it than the same dog during off-hours, esp'ly when off leash
The dogs to which I'm referring did not need a "leave it" cue. The service dogs (both German Shepherds) were trained to ignore any food that isn't handed to them by the owner/handler with a release command whether on or off duty. The pet dogs (both black labs) were trained not to take any edible unless it was specifically given to them. I witnessed the one lab ignore a sandwich and chips on a paper plate on the floor next to where he was lying down while the rest of the family was in another room. The other lab was allowed the run of the house during the day when no one was home, and even on occasions where food was left out, the dog didn't help himself.

It boggles my mind and I don't know nearly enough about dog training to know how this was accomplished.

My favorite story related to this was when my first dog, an 85 lb German Shepherd/yellow lab mix, helped herself to two loaves of pound cake. The punch line is that I was living away at college and only coming home for vacations and my dog would always get car sick during the 5 hour ride. Per the vet's instructions, I withheld food for longer and longer periods of time before the trip, but it didn't stop her from getting sick; it just meant she'd throw up bile or have dry heaves.

You might see where this is going. Mom baked pound cake for me to take back to college and left it unattended on the counter to cool. Mom came back and poof, there was no more pound cake, not even a crumb. & That was the first time my dog didn't get car sick during the 5 hour drive. This is also the dog that ate raw potatoes and onions and a bag of Christmas chocolate that I thought I'd hidden well enough with no ill effects other than giving me a few extra gray hairs, so I shouldn't have been surprised that for her, the solution to her car sickness was more food, not less.

@Emms, I wouldn't think it's a problem with the quality of her food, and I can't speak to the quality of her training. My personal philosophy is to let my dog taste a bite of whatever I'm eating, assuming it's safe for her to do so, just so she doesn't feel like she's missing out. She only gets her taste after I'm finished and only if she's been good and stayed on her bed away from where I'm eating, and then I either use it for reinforcing her leave it/take it commands, or I use it as an extra high value reward for something like muzzle training that I really want to associate with super good things.

I hope your pup got through her pizza adventure with no ill effects, or at least nothing worse than a bit of an upset stomach.
 

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yes, i'm aware of dogs trained to ignore ALL food or food-like substances with zero cue.

BTW, 2 of KikoPup's clips on UTube cover this very issue - training a pos-R refusal of food on offer.

my GSD x Keeshond was taught to ignore my food while camping, even tho it wasn't on the familiar table, but often on the ground - he got none unless he waited politely, & had a portion for himself when he did wait. :D
Being no fool, he got that concept fast.

- terry

 

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The dogs to which I'm referring did not need a "leave it" cue. The service dogs (both German Shepherds) were trained to ignore any food that isn't handed to them by the owner/handler with a release command whether on or off duty. The pet dogs (both black labs) were trained not to take any edible unless it was specifically given to them. I witnessed the one lab ignore a sandwich and chips on a paper plate on the floor next to where he was lying down while the rest of the family was in another room. The other lab was allowed the run of the house during the day when no one was home, and even on occasions where food was left out, the dog didn't help himself.

It boggles my mind and I don't know nearly enough about dog training to know how this was accomplished.

My favorite story related to this was when my first dog, an 85 lb German Shepherd/yellow lab mix, helped herself to two loaves of pound cake. The punch line is that I was living away at college and only coming home for vacations and my dog would always get car sick during the 5 hour ride. Per the vet's instructions, I withheld food for longer and longer periods of time before the trip, but it didn't stop her from getting sick; it just meant she'd throw up bile or have dry heaves.

You might see where this is going. Mom baked pound cake for me to take back to college and left it unattended on the counter to cool. Mom came back and poof, there was no more pound cake, not even a crumb. & That was the first time my dog didn't get car sick during the 5 hour drive. This is also the dog that ate raw potatoes and onions and a bag of Christmas chocolate that I thought I'd hidden well enough with no ill effects other than giving me a few extra gray hairs, so I shouldn't have been surprised that for her, the solution to her car sickness was more food, not less.


@Emms, I wouldn't think it's a problem with the quality of her food, and I can't speak to the quality of her training. My personal philosophy is to let my dog taste a bite of whatever I'm eating, assuming it's safe for her to do so, just so she doesn't feel like she's missing out. She only gets her taste after I'm finished and only if she's been good and stayed on her bed away from where I'm eating, and then I either use it for reinforcing her leave it/take it commands, or I use it as an extra high value reward for something like muzzle training that I really want to associate with super good things.

I hope your pup got through her pizza adventure with no ill effects, or at least nothing worse than a bit of an upset stomach.

Sounds like your dog is like mine. Given that I tend to eat on the couch, and my dog is small, he will lay on my lap ,or right next to me, and ignore my and the food. He's learned that if he pesters me he'll get put on the floor. Thing is he keeps an ear and eye out for signs that I'm finished because he's also learned that when I'm done I'll give him a bite of whatever I'm having. It's amazing to see him suddenly come alive. LOL
 

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@Rain, yes, exactly. I generally eat on the sofa, too, and Mira usually has sofa privileges, but when I'm eating, she's supposed to lie down on her bed in front of the sofa. It's a work in progress because she prefers to lie on the floor directly in front of me and rest her head on my leg, but then she ends up drooling on me. Plus, I have no resistance to a drooling dog. I can resist puppy dog eyes or whining or staring or other forms of silent begging because those are all behaviors the dog is making a conscious decision to do, but drooling is involuntary, so it really triggers my guiltometer. :p If she's going to drool, it needs to be over on her bed where I can ignore it until I'm finished eating my food. If she inches forward or doesn't at least keep her elbows on her bed, she has to wait a bit for her share. If she's good, we'll play a quick round of leave it/take it and she gets her taste right away.
 

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"no amount of "training", no matter how punitive / aversive or even highly-rewarding, will 100% eliminate all eating when chance offers food."

"
yes, i'm aware of dogs trained to ignore ALL food or food-like substances with zero cue...."


Huh ????? This thread is getting confusing.

 

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There is nothing to really worry about she might get some diarrhea for a few days not much else to worry about. It probably doesn't have anything to do with training. Most dogs will eat food off the floor it can be trained out of them but I don't think thats what happened. She saw the food and ate it like most dogs do. I would just watch her and your training is fine. My huskies don't eat human food they don't even want near it but my brother's lab will go after anything that falls on the floor :)
 

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It might be due to the reason that the food look tasty to your dog. And this might be the reason why your dog could not control even though he was trained. There is no such need to go to the vet if he is alright. And if he is showing any reaction that is different like - vomiting, diarrhea, and so on... Then, you must be looking forward to look for the vet and get it checked up as soon as possible.
 
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