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Recently we started taking our dogs to a dog park (Black labradane and hound huskie mix.) The lab has always been great just playing fetch all the time passionately and listens so well when you call him, but the other ran around barking crazy until we got an E bark training collar for him. He calmed his antics down however when it died he went back to barking all the time. Well in the past month the lab has started randomly jumping at other dogs. They are both excitable but the hound mix just runs barking and when other dogs get too near the lab he growls and jumps them randomly. More information, the hound huskie has always behaved like an alpha so I think 2 reasons for the aggression might have to do with the lab fetching and because of his chase mindset he attacks other dogs cause they are in way or maybe the hounds barking makes him nervous and causes the lab to bark. Just today he attacked a dog on the way in, one while in near the water dish, one when I took him out and again when I tried to take him back in. He stop his growling and jumping when I pull him back. I don't know what to do to fix the problem. any suggestions?? :(
 

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Ditch the e-collar and train your dogs to do what you want them to do. Exercise your dogs somewhere else until your dogs are able to mix with other dogs without causing conflict. The 'fix' will not be instant, will need your total commitment, patience and time.

How old are your dogs? How much physical and mental activity do they get every day? What sort of training have you done with your dogs?
 

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First, I would say these two don't sound ready to be at the dog park. Not all dogs like dog parks, some tolerate them, some love them, some will consistently bark at you until you leave (like my older dog), and sometimes it can bring out insecurity, fear, or aggression (as it seems to in yours). I like to think of dog parks as the human equivalent of a big party- imagine how overwhelming that is for someone anxious or how irritating it would be for a low-key person that doesn't like to dance (ie, dogs that don't want to wrestle).

I personally do not go to dog parks until my dogs have proved to at least be OK with other dogs off leash (don't have to love but shouldn't be aggressive or fearful) and have good recall.

Also- dog parks are, IMO, one of the worst places to use as primary exercise. Unstructured play is great, but IME especially in high energy dogs too much of it will make them amped up all the time. I think loose leash walking- and for higher energy dogs jogging- is very important for teaching manners while exercising and socializing.

1) definitely don't use an E-collar anymore. I personally do not like them and think that they work more for suppressing behavior than actually teaching not to do something. What was your reasoning for using it in the first place? A lot of dogs like to bark when they're exciting, which though it can be annoying is a very exciting and natural behavior for them. Some situations that's maybe not great, but at a designated dog park that should, I feel, be the time they should be allowed to bark to their heart's content.

2) How much exercise do they get and how old are they? Labs, Huskies, and Hounds (and some young Great Danes) are pretty high energy breeds- given their mixes I'd give a stab that they're higher energy, especially if they're under 4 or 5, so I would be thinking at least two 30min walks a day, probably more like 2 45min walks or more. I'd also be walking them separately since it sounds like they have issues on leash. You really can't effectively work with 2 dogs at once on something like this.

2) I'd highly recommend reading this article on dominance in dogs:
https://apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/dominance/
It's a vastly misunderstood concept these days given the unfortunate popularity of dominance training/theory.

3) I'm reading this as they have dog issues on and off leash? I'd work on recall with both dogs a lot (so you can call them away from problem situations)- you can/probably should use a long line of 15-30' for this so you still have control. I'd also work on attention- if you have a reactive dog they should be looking at you/checking in and at a good loose leash heel all the time. Teach them attention/look (meaning, look me in the eye) and target commands (touch nose to fingers or open palm). Try to always carry treats with you; you want every opportunity to be a learning experience. You're going to have to be vigilant on walks- don't be stiff or afraid of seeing others, just aware. Whenever you see another dog, ask for attention, give a treat. Continue as the dog gets closer- I'd suggest moving to the side of the walk and if the other owner doesn't get the message give a verbal heads up your dog doesn't like others. Ask for targets as they pass by to really distract them and if they don't lunge give a bunch of treats. If they do lunge oh well, better luck next time. I would suggest doing this one-on-one for awhile. I haven't read this in ts entirety but this site seems to have good tips for reactivity:
Reactivity and Aggression in dogs – Managing and Treating - Smart Animal Training Systems...

In dealing with this problem I would avoid using corrections and training collars meant to give corrections like e-collars, choke chains and prongs. One thing that can happen is corrections can shut a dog down- making it seem like they've stopped the behavior when really it has possibly gotten worse and they just aren't physically expressing it as much. On the flip side, corrections can cause increased reactivity, tipping anxiety or fear or excitement towards aggression or increase aggression from a manageable level to a more dangerous one. Here's a summary of a veterinary journal article about this:
Confrontational Techniques Elicit Aggression
and the publication itself:
http://vet.osu.edu/assets/pdf/hospital/behavior/trainingArticle.pdf

Hope that is some help, sorry for the extreme length!
 

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The first thing you need to do, is ditch your E collar. Your dogs have anxiety- which can manifest itself in many ways. Being afraid to interact isn't the only sign of anxiety around other dogs: barking, attacking, dominance, rough play, etc can all be signs. The E collar is making it worse. Your husky/hound, who you have been shocking when he barks, now associates the dog park with pain. To be completely honest, you may never be able to take him back and have him be comfortable. You should look into positive methods to reduce the barking, but I believe you need a professional to get you started.

Second, like a poster above me said, some dogs just don't enjoy the park. Mine do, but I can identify one or two dogs every time we go who probably shouldn't be there. Either because they have no interest in interacting and seem bored, or because it makes them nervous- manifested by extreme submission or aggression.

Finally, you said your lab attacked the other dogs. If I remember correctly, it was 3 times? I am sorry if this sounds harsh, but I cannot believe you did not take him right out of there after the first time. You have caused a dangerous situation for the other people and dogs around you. You would have been completely liable if somebody had gotten hurt and nobody would have had sympathy for someone who did not remove a clearly aggressive dog. You should not be taking your lab back to the park until he can demonstrate friendly acceptance of other animals. It is situations like the one you described that takes all the benefits away from going to the dog park: somebody has an animal who clearly shouldn't be there, and everybody else has to pay the price.
 
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