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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our animal shelter will not adopt out any pets 1 week prior to Christmas and that remains in effect until after New Years.

Nor will they adopt out dogs or cats a week before the Fourth of July, unless they know the dog doesn't react to fireworks.
Every year, cats across the nation suffer terrible injury by cruel, often drunk, people who think it would be funny to insert a firecracker into the backside of a cat and lite it. Also cats too can be terrified of firework sounds and just run off.

Cats/kittens - a week ban before Halloween, as some people can be very cruel to cats, (especially black ones) during Halloween.

The biggest issue though is the shelter had too many newly adopted pets that ran off during the Fourth, most were found but a few never were, so they figured if people really want an animal bad enough they can put the one they want on hold until a few days after that event.

Ditto with bunnies if they should happen to have any at the shelter around Easter. They won't adopt them out as too many people get all 'Easter crazy' with small kids and think a Easter Bunny for a pet would be great. But it's often impulse adoption...and then they realize the bunny's cage will smell, and there's some work that goes with having a bunny in the house as a pet.

Christmas and New Years are such busy times for most people. The emotions are running high, guests are often over...people leaving for Christmas parties, plays, events at night...and the kids are home from school, getting ramped up for Christmas.

Often times they are bored from being home all day...so they have all this built up energy and often a puppy that is a Christmas gift, gets played into exhaustion by 2 or 3 kids not letting it go and rest when needed.

Many adults, too, like to go out drinking for New Years, leaving a new pet with a babysitter who's often barely watching the kids, much less how they kids are behaving around a new puppy or kitten..

So for those reason, our shelter limits certain times a pet can be adopted.

The policy ticked off a lot of people in this town when first implemented. Not all people celebrate Christmas, The 4th, or nor go out and drink during New Years. And those who were busy, felt they were smart enough to wedge a dog or cat into their lives during the holidays without the dog or cat suffering any from it.

But, I kind of think the shelter is right....it stops a lot of impulse adoptions, and even if it protects 4 or 5 animals a year from going into a not so good situations... I think it's worth making people wait a week or two at the most for a pet...if they found one they wanted to adopt. Especially since the shelter will let people go up and visit the animal and with the dogs even take them for walks.

Stormy
 

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We got our dog last year just before Christmas, but because my husband had time off work, the kids were off school, and it was better to have people home for her. Plus we wanted it to be spring when she was ready to start taking long walks.

I can see the reason, I am just glad our shelter didn't do that, as vacation time helps a lot when settling in a new member of the family and a lot of vacation time falls on popular holidays.
 

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im unsure though the local spca is closed till the 11th Jan so i assume that comes into effect as well?
 

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I do believe some area shelters here don't adopt out black cats at the end of October. However, I disagree with the other things. In my opinion, if someone passes through the adoption procedure and gets approved on March 20th, why shouldn't they get approved on December 20th? Or July 1st? I do think they should be warned about safety and "not just for Christmas/Easter" talks. Equally if someone says they're going to give a pet as a surprise birthday gift to someone in the middle of the year, that same person should get rejected if they're looking to give a pet as a surprise Christmas gift. And I think most shelters would reject anyone looking for a bunny as an Easter gift.

Some shelters here actually have promotions around the holidays. The shelter Stella came from will allow people to pre-pay an adoption fee and then give dog and cat toys as gifts with notes attached that say "There's a dog/cat waiting for you to choose them at --- Animal Shelter!" Another shelter actually has a Santa Claus and "sleigh" going around town Christmas Eve and day bringing pets to people's homes who have been approved to adopt. Typically it's families with kids. Both these shelters have great adoption rates, adopters and stats of adopters actually keeping the pets.

I have to add I've never heard of anyone doing that horrifying thing about sticking a fire cracker up a cat's butt. That's sickening.
 

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I think the "not after Christmas" is just stupid. If anything, a well thought out getting of a dog on Dec 26th is the best idea. Most people have a week off--or even more--and the dog has enough time to adjust to the family before everyone goes back to work and school.

I got my dog 7 years ago 2 days after christmas. I lived out of state, had a good record, and the shelter I wanted to get it from was near my parents. I contacted them nearly 2 weeks before hand and got the info. I met the dog, paid the fee, and took her home. I cannot say how many lightyears better it was than my first dog who I adopted mid-week, mid-summer was.

That said, I chose the shelter near my parents because the shelters near me wanted $300-400 for a healthy adult dog, they wanted to inspect my home, they wanted to meet with my landlord and a bunch of other insanely restrictive things. Sorry. Nope. I have a signed letter from my landlord, a statement from my to-be dog sitter and a well-known vet. That should suffice in any normal land.
 

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It falls into the category of 'one size fits all'. It may make some sense for some, but not for others. IMO the shelter should perhaps put more energy into checking the qualifications of those interested in adoptions. For those that are truly qualified, those qualifications will be valid on any date.
 

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I can understand curbing impulsive adoptions at Christmas, but I would think maybe saying there would be no adoptions from, say, Dec. 23-26 and then allow them to start again on the 27th. I'd assume the shelter is closed for adoptions on Christmas Eve and Day anyway, so that just adds an extra day on either side of that as a buffer, keeps puppies from being Christmas morning "toys", and still allows folks that want to adopt an animal during their vacation time so they can spend more time with it, the opportunity to do that.

Fourth of July? I'd say that's kind of silly. You could adopt an animal on June 25th and it still get freaked out on July 4th from fireworks. As for the cat thing, there are sick people all year round. If it's not a cat adopted from a shelter, they'll just find one in the neighborhood to torture if they're determined to do that.

Bunnies? I could see not allowing them to be adopted the day before Easter. I'd assume the shelter is close on Easter Sunday.

Black cats during Halloween, sure, that happens, but kind of like the firecrackers and the 4th, if the sicko is determined to torture a cat, any cat will do. The cat that was adopted in September might fall victim to one of these jerks, there's no way to know.

I think the policy comes from good intentions, but I can see why people might be upset about not being able to adopt a pet the entire week before Halloween, or the whole week before the 4th of July, or the two weeks surrounding Christmas and New Year's (when people like me have much MORE time for a new pet). I mean, not everyone who wants to adopt a shelter dog for their family for Christmas is a thoughtless impulse buyer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think with the adoptions around the 4th....their biggest concern is that newly adopted animals are stressed from being in a new home for only a day or two and then the majority of the fireworks going off on the night of the 4th.

A bit before and after the 4th there are always 'stray' firework pops that happen, but not as intensely as on that night. So they just buffer the adoptions before and after that date.

They do understand that holidays are often 'free' time for some family members who get time off from work and can be with a pet for more hours. But again, so many people are so busy during the holidays that the shelter just feel a pet should be introduced into a family and have their first experiences with the family be like what is for 'normal' for that family and not one excited kids, or the house being rearranged as decorations go up and then get taken down...etc...

Also, on New Years eve, besides worrying if newly adoptive folks were actually home caring for the pet or leaving it with kids and a babysitter while they went out drinking, there's often fireworks going off at midnight too.

The shelter over the years, before this policy was implemented, had to deal with so many lost pets and a few of them had been adopted a few days before big calendar events. They just finally decided to try something different to see if they could do something to protect newly adoptive animals from holiday stresses.

They've had this policy now for some years, so they seem to be happy with the results...that pets are still getting adopted, and it's reduced the chances of a newly adopted pet literally getting lost in the holiday shuffle or escaping from fear during times of firework events and not knowing where home is (as they only been there a day or two).

I've seen some shelters with adoption requirements that only a saint could qualify for...and our shelter isn't any where near that that bad, plus they have kept their adoption fees pretty low. I think it's like $45.00 for a spayed female/$35.00 for neutered males, and discounts for older animals.

That holiday adoption ban policy might or might not be a plus or negative...depending upon who's wishing to adopt...but given everything on whole, I think our shelter is pretty fair about things and does an excellent job in getting the right animal in the right homes and even at the right times.

Stormy
 

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Our shelters push adoptions a ton around the holidays. I think it makes sense to stop them though, because getting animals as gifts is never a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Our shelters push adoptions a ton around the holidays. I think it makes sense to stop them though, because getting animals as gifts is never a good idea.
I wouldn't say 'never' a good idea, but often people are gifted with animals they don't want or need at a certain time in their lives. A boyfriend gifting a puppy to a girlfriend...without asking if she wants one....etc... those things happen a lot, I think.

I know, that in the past, when I had to put elderly pets to sleep, people who knew me and who had good intentions would try to get me to take in a dog or cat that they found...not taking into account, my heart wasn't into taking in a new pet yet, and...their idea of a pet I might like was a far cry different than one I would actually want.

But sometimes, when it's been discussed, like between a husband and wife with with no kids, or a mom and dad agreeing on getting the kids a dog and knowing what kind of dog the family should have and such...then those kinds of gifts are great. They are planned out and not impulse things or gifting an animal to someone who's not really wanting one.

Stormy
 

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our local shelter does adopt out during and shortly before christmas, but usually the application period needs a bit time and the people and the homes get checked before a dog or cat goes there.
You've got to tell the people what you work, how much time and money you want to spend on the dog...often people that work fulltime for example will have difficulties getting a dog from shelters, when they don't have someone to take care of the dog in the meantime.
plus it depends on the dog. a puppy will very likely spend another week until after christmas, while the long-time inmates (often victims of the breed-laws, working dog breeds that come from wrong hands etc.) will be more likely to get a home during the christmas days, if the person can proof that they're ready and willing to care for them and that it is positive for the dog to move in during these days.
 

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I agree with a lot of the other posters. I would assume that shelters screen adopters in July or December as well as they do in February or May.

Animal cruelty such as sticking a firecracker in a cat sounds like something that can happen year round and is a case of animal cruelty, not holiday festivities. Normal people don't do that. Just don't let psychopaths adopt animals ANY time of the year! If it's not firecrackers, it's beating, drowning, etc. Besides, those people can find free cats on Craigslist or even take an outdoor or stray cat off the streets. I don't see why they would want to go through applying and visiting shelters and paying an adoption fee for a cat they could find anywhere.

I don't really see how time of year would affect whether a particular home is suited for a pet or not. Some people might want to get their family a pet for Christmas, but how is that different from deciding to get a pet on any other day of the year if the shelter is requiring applications and interviews. The shelter should be able to have a good idea of whether if it's an impulse buy or if it's really a good home the same as any other day (are they going to ban people from adopting on their birthdays as well?). It's up to the shelter to screen adopters to decide whether or not they'll be a good fit for the animal, and the time of year isn't too important- they should be asking about animal experience, exercise, housing situation, medical care, etc.

I agree about Independence Day/days with fireworks because I can imagine that being very stressful for a new animal. Black cats on Halloween and bunnies on Easter makes sense as well, but again, you can argue that people that want to hurt animals can do that any time of the year for free!

But other holidays, yeah some people are busier than usual, but others have a lot of time off they wouldn't have during a normal week to help the animal adjust.
 

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I absolutely agree with revolutionrocknroll.

Also, having people adopt and/or foster dogs around the Fourth of July is a VERY GOOD thing where I live. The shelters fill up around the 4th with dogs getting loose because of fireworks and with people dumping their dogs because they want to take vacations. July and August are VERY HIGH KILL months for us here in Southern California. I walked through my local shelter a week before the 4th of July and nearly every kennel was filled, the smaller ones with three or four small dogs. Then, the shelter took in another thirty dogs during the holiday vacation, and the shelter started euthanizing the owner surrenders and the pits as soon as their stray holds were up.

In contrast, another shelter in my area led a very successful effort to foster out as many dogs as they could into private homes this past 4th of July to make room for all of the dogs spooked by fireworks. If some of these dogs ended up being adopted by their foster families, that would have been a very good thing.
 

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I think this is a good idea but I saw these on Facebook and loved them:


 
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