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If you’re a fan of running, chances are you’ll want to take your dog along at some point.

However, running with your dog can be risky unless you know how to prepare Fido for the run ahead.
To learn more about precautions—what to do, what not to do—we talked to Dr. Lindsay Seilheimer, DVM, CCRP, a Rehabilitative Medicine Veterinarian at the Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC), a Chicago based specialty clinic and emergency hospital.

THK: When it comes to running, are all breeds the same or are some breeds “born to run” while others are “born to take a stroll”?

Lindsay Seilheimer: All breeds are not the same! Labradors, Retrievers and Terriers are examples of dogs that make good running partners. Dogs who are low to the ground (such as Basset Hounds) will have a harder time keeping up. Dogs who have a short nose such as French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs, Pugs and Boston Terriers are often born with narrow nostrils, long soft palates and narrow tracheas that cause them to have a hard time moving air into their airways. These breeds may not be able to tolerate going for a run. And of course, even within the same breed, there are some dogs (like people) who just won’t enjoy it.

THK: Is there such a thing as “too young to run”? What’s a good age to get your dog started in running with you?

LS: You should never run with a puppy before the growth plates have closed. For small breeds this is around 10-12 months and for large breeds it can take as long as 14-16 months. Your regular veterinarian will be able to help you know when your dog is ready. Start all exercise programs slowly and make it fun for your dog with a lot of positive reinforcement!

THK: How about “too old to run”?

LS: Age is not a disease so as long as your dog is healthy and without joint issues there is no reason not to run. If an older dog is slow to stand up from laying down or seems sore after a run there is probably some underlying joint discomfort—many owners mistake these signs for the dog just generally “slowing down” due to age but typically, it’s joint pain that will slow your pet before just “old age.”

THK: What about running on cement and roads in general? Any precautions to keep in mind?

LS: It is best to try to avoid paved surfaces and stick to softer areas such as grass if you can. Hard surfaces will put more force on the joints. Paw pads can become injured on rough surfaces so owners should check them frequently. If you would be uncomfortable on a surface your dog will be too. During summer, pay special attention to the temperature of the pavement as well—if you can’t keep your hand on the pavement for longer than a few seconds, your dog shouldn’t be on it for long periods either.

Read more at The Honest Kitchen Blog
 

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What is the reason for not running until the growth plates close? In humans, running and sports take place well before growth plate closure, what is the physiological difference that would not permit that for dogs?
 

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What is the reason for not running until the growth plates close? In humans, running and sports take place well before growth plate closure, what is the physiological difference that would not permit that for dogs?
Hi Lucille, thank you for your interest in our blog post. We reached out to Dr. Lindsay Seilheimer regarding your question and she suggests the following.
"We know that dogs who undergo strenuous exercise while their growth plates are immature and who have predispositions to orthopedic abnormalities (such as hip dysplasia) develop more severe symptoms as they age than patients who are limited in their activity during development. I cannot speak to human medicine, but a 6 month old dog is biologically comparable to an 8-12 year old child." Hope this helps!
 
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