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I feel so bad when I have to go to work and lock my dog in her cage. She just looks at me and whimpers. I am nervous to have her "roam" the house when no one is there. Do you let your dog roam? If so, how long did it take for you to "trust" him/her before you did?
 

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I feel so bad when I have to go to work and lock my dog in her cage. She just looks at me and whimpers. I am nervous to have her "roam" the house when no one is there. Do you let your dog roam? If so, how long did it take for you to "trust" him/her before you did?
You have to huge by what the dog does when you are home. Does she chew on things she is not supposed to, Does she do anything you don't like? Most dogs sleep most of the time they are alone. Maybe you could start by leaving her in one room and see how she does. How old is she?
 

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Depends on the dog. I left Dynamo in a crate for her young years so she couldn't pester her elderly buddy into a war.
Sonic now stays in a tiny spare bedroom, but hope to soon be leaving him in the basement which is our furnished living/dining room.
For you, why not "test" your dog for very short times, like 15 minutes, then 1/2 hour and see how he does in a larger space.
Kongs and puzzle treat balls help.
Exercise too.
The crate itself is not usually the problem if roomy & comfy.
 
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I agree, I leave my dog Charlie roaming in my house only because I trust him not to mess things up. As Artdog said leaving the dog roaming the house for short periods of time and see how things go, best of luck:p
 
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She is 2 years old but she honestly acts like she is older. She is pretty mellow and doesn't chew on anything. I just got her about 2 weeks so I'm not sure what she would do without me being there. I will try the little at a time and see how she does. Do you leave food and water for them when you leave them out?
 

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I started my dog out in a crate; then moved to a small room that had little in it that he could damage (or that could hurt him) with the crate in that room with its door open so that he could curl up in it if he wished; and now, he has the run of several rooms of the house because I can trust that he won't get into anything. Actually, he was never that destructive in the first place, but when I first got him, he'd been a stray, and I wasn't sure if he had any house manners or not. I agree that it's good to start with just short periods of time of freedom and move up gradually to longer stretches of time as the dog proves he/she is handling it well.
 

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Betsy was 4 when we adopted her. There was no question of her being confined to a crate or even one room. She's a good dog & as she was assessed in foster I knew she would be fine loose in the house. I'm personally not a fan of crates/cages, especially for long periods of time.
 

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Levi is free, I tried him out at 6 months and he was fine. Heidi was out of the crate at 7 months, but she has recently decided that the couch looked delicious, so she is crate bound for a little while again. :p
 

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I got Zody when he was just over a year old from a friend so I knew he was relatively good in the house but even knowing that I made sure to pick up anything he shouldn't have that I thought might tempt him, before leaving him for a short time. I knew he had a weakness for emery boards, and used tissue so those were picked up along with people food. He did well and has ever since. If he ever took to destroying stuff he would be crated for the safety of both him and my things.
 
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My corgi mix is allowed to roam. We never introduced him to the crate (except for car rides) as it is not a common method of training in my country.
However, since getting another dog, I do not feel comfortable letting them both out together when I am gone. I put one of those dog gates in too separate them so they can both not be crated.
 

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If you want more room I would suggest penning off an area of the house. That is what I do with Tux and I am working my way up to leaving him in the house by himself while I am gone.
 

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She is 2 years old but she honestly acts like she is older. She is pretty mellow and doesn't chew on anything. I just got her about 2 weeks so I'm not sure what she would do without me being there. I will try the little at a time and see how she does. Do you leave food and water for them when you leave them out?
When I read this post, I thought of this quote by Patricia McConnell, the author of "Love Has No Age Limit":

“Three days, three weeks, three months.” That’s the mantra of many dog trainers and behaviorists, when welcoming a new dog into their household. The “magic of threes” is especially relevant when adopting an adolescent or adult dog into your home. Dogs, especially non-puppies, are often in a bit of shock for the first three days in a new home, and don’t show you too much about who they are until they’ve been there a few days. After three weeks many dogs have settled in such that they behave as though they feel like they are “home” now, but don’t fit into your routine until about three months have gone by."
You've only had your dog for a very short amount of time. Often times, it's at the two-week mark (or later) when rescue dogs begin to start feeling more comfortable and start revealing more of their quirks, both positive and negative.

I think I would stay the course with the crate for now. New dogs often do well with consistent routines. I'd continue to let her settle down in your home.
 

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My dog has free range of the living room and kitchen, but I close the doors to all of the other rooms. Too much to keep track of making sure she won't get into anything she's not supposed to while I'm gone. I trusted her two weeks after bringing her home.

Start with small trips out and she how she reacts, then gradually make the outings longer until you build your trust with her. One of my friends set up a skype account for her dog and calls her dog on a computer that has a view of her, so she can see what the dogs are doing while they're alone. Might be fun to try. :)
 
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