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Discussion Starter #1
We currently have an 80lb, 3yr old Black Lab-mix we got as a rescue at age 1 (we think). She's been a great dog, with no problems other than maybe liking people food a little too much.

Our girl, Pepper, has the run of the house, sleeps sometimes with us, sometimes with our daughters (20 and 14) or sometimes alone--her choice. She has a fenced yard to run around in. Pepper has shown no aggression to other dogs, the rare times she's around them--she likes to rough house, but only after coming u[, sniffing the other dog, then rolling onto her back and showing her belly. She's very submissive even to the smallest of dogs.

We don't have a dog park nearby, nor a doggy daycare. We don't take Pepper for walks, due to some of our health problems. She gets a lot of play at home, inside and out. In fact, she often acts as though we give her too much attention and will go off for some quiet time alone in a corner of the house.

For the past couple months, Pepper will see another dog in the distance and begin to whine/whimper while sitting quietly, watching them. Rabbits, squirrels and cats produce excited barking and lunges. She loves chasing squirrels. She only does this whining when she can't go over to the other dog. When we go to the groomer, or around a friend's dog, this behavior doesn't happen: she's excited to see the other dog and wants to play, play, play.

It honestly seems like she's sad that she can't play with other dogs.

We are fine with just one dog, but would also be fine adding another. The question is, does our giant puppy really need a live-in buddy?
 

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I personally would say yes to the idea of her own play pal. Does she NEED one? Probably not. Dogs can do good on their own with us. I noticed ours do GREAT with two! Best of luck on your decision.
 

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if pepper is submissive and gets along with dogs, I would say yes to a sister or a brother! our lab loved having a little brother when he was still around, but on the other hand our little one didnt like it when he got a younger brother because he was too dominant
I would encourage getting a brother or sister for pepper!
 

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My concern is that she doesn’t get any walks at all. Regular walks is a basic necessity for any dog and it’s hard, to not say impossible, to replace them with other activities indoors. Not offering walks and other suitable activities can sadly lead to a discontent dog. Would you be able to look over your situation and maybe start walking her? I understand that it’s hard if you can’t due to health problems. But do everyone in the family suffer from these health problems so they can’t walk her? Can anybody else help out, a relative, neighbor, dogwalker etc? I don’t want to come off as too harsh but walks really is a necessity for dogs and you as an owner needs to make sure you can offer that.

I really would dissuade you from getting another dog. In my opinion you don’t buy dogs for dogs. You buy dogs because you have the time and interest. A dog that gets the right stimulation and activities would have no trouble living as a one-dog. I would recommend you to focus on the dog you have, get her properly exercised. Then you wouldn’t have to complement her life with another dog which in their turn also would need to be walked to be healthy and content. :)
 

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The problem with getting a pet for your pet (which is exactly what you’re talking about doing) is that neither dog is cared for in the way they need. What happens if your current dog doesn’t like the new dog? It happens. What if you end up with two dogs, like mine, that couldn’t care less about playing with each other and want 100% of your attention? Then you have two dogs to walk, train, play with, and entertain instead of just one. If you get a second dog, you could very easily end up with two bored, unhappy dogs and absolutely WILL end up with two dogs that aren’t getting everything out of life that they should.
 

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Agree that walking a dog is not just about moving the legs and body its about stimulating the mind in a way that games in the back yard dont.
If your not really coping with one dog and honestly not being about to walk and letting her get overweight (a female lab should be less than 60 lbs) means its a bad idea to get another dog even if your dog would enjoy the company. Maybe you would be better off spending the money you would have paid out for extra dog food etc on a doggy walking service..
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Re, my lab-mix's weight... she is taller and broader than pure labs we've seen out. She looks like a borador, but she's so big I wonder if she's got some shepherd or newfoundland or something. She can, and frequently does, lay her head on the table at dinner time.

Re: dog walking.... I gre up in Midwest Suburbs in the 1970s. Nobody walked their dog. Dogs had yards. Only people that lived in town in apartments walked their dogs (on TV). Today, I see people walking dogs even out in the country. When did this happen? I didnt have any dogs from about 1982 to 2005, so I guess I missed this transition.

I've known many dogs, my whole life, that never got regularly walked. They were great dogs, running free in big, fenced yards or out on farms. I'm really puzzled by the modern obsession with dog walking.
 

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Re, my lab-mix's weight... she is taller and broader than pure labs we've seen out. She looks like a borador, but she's so big I wonder if she's got some shepherd or newfoundland or something. She can, and frequently does, lay her head on the table at dinner time.

Re: dog walking.... I gre up in Midwest Suburbs in the 1970s. Nobody walked their dog. Dogs had yards. Only people that lived in town in apartments walked their dogs (on TV). Today, I see people walking dogs even out in the country. When did this happen? I didnt have any dogs from about 1982 to 2005, so I guess I missed this transition.

I've known many dogs, my whole life, that never got regularly walked. They were great dogs, running free in big, fenced yards or out on farms. I'm really puzzled by the modern obsession with dog walking.
I can’t speak on her weight. The important thing is to keep her in the right body condition for her size, with a slim and fit shape.
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Concerning the walking, I don’t think it’s relevant to refer to what people did or didn’t do 50 years ago. A lot have changed and the knowledge about dogs have developed for owners to care for their dogs in a better and more correct way than for 50 years ago.

Maybe the exception for the need of daily walks is a dog living on a farm. But then with the presumption that the dog and owner spend hours and hours out on the farm and the dog is included in farmwork. However you can’t compare that, to a dog that just being let out in your yard or have a few playtime sessions with. All dogs needs to be walked maybe for about an hour daily (obviously more if you have a dog with higher exercise need). But of course any amount of walking you can do is better than nothing.

Here is some information on the subject:



 

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Guess its cultural. Weve had dogs all my life and 50 years ago my father walked our dogs every single day. I've never known it to be any other way.
 

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I have two dogs and they never play together, they like each other fine but they don't play together.
Could you arrange puppy play dates? Get friends, family, neighbors together with their dogs for a backyard picnic and doggy play time?
 

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Walking dogs... I didn't see any of our military working dogs in the USAF going for walks. They rode in cars when on duty, and lived in the kennels at night. On some days, they ran the yard at the kennels or did obstacles. They trained a lot, but none of that training involved a daily regimen of a walk.

I live in a neighborhood with a lot of police. I don't see them walking their K9s either. I find it hard to believe that very expensive K9s and MWDs would not be walked daily if it was so necessary to their health.

One of the dumbest reasons I've heard for the need for daily walks is that dogs in the wild regularly went out, looking for food... and that walking today fulfills that primal need to go forage and range. That's all well and good, but I'm fairly certain there were never any wild poodles, Shepherds or schnauzers, etc. We've bred that wanderlust out of many breeds. Ancient pre-dogs chose to give up that free-ranging to live alongside us.

And what dog would choose to be tethered to our side rather than run free in a yard or on a farm?

As for the fat chart above, my dog would fall into the ideal category from the side, overweight looking down on her. Maybe a horse chart would be better, since she's considerably bigger than we thought she'd get when we adopted her. It's like she won't ever stop growing.
 

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Walking dogs... I didn't see any of our military working dogs in the USAF going for walks. They rode in cars when on duty, and lived in the kennels at night. On some days, they ran the yard at the kennels or did obstacles. They trained a lot, but none of that training involved a daily regimen of a walk.

I live in a neighborhood with a lot of police. I don't see them walking their K9s either. I find it hard to believe that very expensive K9s and MWDs would not be walked daily if it was so necessary to their health.

One of the dumbest reasons I've heard for the need for daily walks is that dogs in the wild regularly went out, looking for food... and that walking today fulfills that primal need to go forage and range. That's all well and good, but I'm fairly certain there were never any wild poodles, Shepherds or schnauzers, etc. We've bred that wanderlust out of many breeds. Ancient pre-dogs chose to give up that free-ranging to live alongside us.

And what dog would choose to be tethered to our side rather than run free in a yard or on a farm?

As for the fat chart above, my dog would fall into the ideal category from the side, overweight looking down on her. Maybe a horse chart would be better, since she's considerably bigger than we thought she'd get when we adopted her. It's like she won't ever stop growing.
I don’t think you’re right to assume things about the military just because you personally haven’t seen them walk their dogs. I know for a fact that the military and police dogs in my country gets walked, since that’s just common sense. However, I feel that it’s quite irrelevant to compare a military/police dogs rutines to your companion dog that’s let out in the yard. Lets say they’re not being walked (even tough we don’t know), these are working dogs that gets hours of training and physical exercise daily to be able to preform in their role as a military/police dog. So it’s really unfair and irrelevant to look at what the k9 dogs does or doesn’t, since they’re for sure are provided with great amount of training and exercise daily.

That's all well and good, but I'm fairly certain there were never any wild poodles, Shepherds or schnauzers, etc. We've bred that wanderlust out of many breeds. Ancient pre-dogs chose to give up that free-ranging to live alongside us.
I don’t know if you’re aware of the history of dogs and of different breeds. But every individual breed have been bred for a specific purpose. Lets just look at the breeds you mentioned yourself; poodles were bred to be working dogs as water retrievers. German Shepards was originally bred as herding dogs but soon bred for the use in the military and police. Schnauzers purpose was to be on the farm, in stables and hunting for rats etc.

All dogs were originally bred for a purpose and almost all dogs were kept due to their workability. But that’s not how we keep dogs anymore. In most cases they’re only kept as company, which is fine for many breeds, but you still need to provide the dog with the right mental and physical stimulation. No, you’ve not bought a wolf that’s needs to wander 20 miles a day, hunting their prey etc. But it’s not a plushy toy you’ve bought either. Dogs are still a very active animal, ancestor to the wolf and bred for their durability and workability for centuries. Walking is the absolute minimum activity you should offer your dog. It’s a basic necessity and provides the minimum of physical and mental stimulation a companion bred dog needs.

I assume you’re joking about the horse chart, but the size of the dog doesn’t matter when looking at it’s weight. Of course the shape of the body will differ from breed to breed. Obviously a greyhound and a mastiff can’t achieve the same body in a healthy way. But it’s still a good guide line and often very accurate. Regardless the size of the dog you want a tucked up tummy and a significant waist.
 

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I say do what works for you, if they have a yard to run and play in then you're fine. Dogs can live without a daily walk, especially when there's so many other options for exercise and stimulation. I think your dog would enjoy the playmate and it'd help him work off some of those table scraps. :)
 

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I have no doubt your dogs happy as it knows no different and is well loved and i understand why you cant walk due to health problems but its not fair on the second dog to not get to sniff where others dogs have peed or to swim somewhere ect ect.
 

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I say do what works for you, if they have a yard to run and play in then you're fine. Dogs can live without a daily walk, especially when there's so many other options for exercise and stimulation. I think your dog would enjoy the playmate and it'd help him work off some of those table scraps. :)
My neighbour got a young dog 2ish yrs ago. We have a very small yard. That dog has not stepped out the front door once. She is physicaly fine to walk the dog and has a car. She showed me its nails once and they were curled right around. She also left it alone for over 48hrs at xmas. To me thats animal abuse. Sorry for neighbour rant
 

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My neighbour got a young dog 2ish yrs ago. We have a very small yard. That dog has not stepped out the front door once. She is physicaly fine to walk the dog and has a car. She showed me its nails once and they were curled right around. She also left it alone for over 48hrs at xmas. To me thats animal abuse. Sorry for neighbour rant
I agree there are people who just shouldn't own dogs. She was clearly the person who shouldn't. Nails can be trimmed regularly and with kids in their home I'm sure the posters pets get regular exercise from play. My kids wear out our dog, that she doesn't even like walks. She'll go to the end of the block and turn around like nope, let's go back!
 

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I agree there are people who just shouldn't own dogs. She was clearly the person who shouldn't. Nails can be trimmed regularly and with kids in their home I'm sure the posters pets get regular exercise from play. My kids wear out our dog, that she doesn't even like walks. She'll go to the end of the block and turn around like nope, let's go back!
I know we won’t come far as to agree with each other and it’s clear that I strongly disagree with it being okay or acceptable to not walk your dog.

However, I just wanted to point out that it’s extremely rare that dogs don’t like walks. And if that’s the case it’s up to the owner to deal with it since it’s clearly an issue for the dog. I’ve heard multiple times owners stating that their dog doesn’t like walks when that’s clearly not the case. One time with a foster dog I got, the owner said that the dog didn’t enjoy walks at all (she was still walked multiple times a day though) but oh was she wrong.. The dog had some insecurities and could be quite timid but that’s something we worked on and after that going for walks was the best thing she knew.

Such behavior is often grounded in fear or insecurity or just weird habits, sometimes dogs get weird fixes. However I can almost reassure you 100% that your dog would love walks if you let her to.
 

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I know we won’t come far as to agree with each other and it’s clear that I strongly disagree with it being okay or acceptable to not walk your dog.

However, I just wanted to point out that it’s extremely rare that dogs don’t like walks. And if that’s the case it’s up to the owner to deal with it since it’s clearly an issue for the dog. I’ve heard multiple times owners stating that their dog doesn’t like walks when that’s clearly not the case. One time with a foster dog I got, the owner said that the dog didn’t enjoy walks at all (she was still walked multiple times a day though) but oh was she wrong.. The dog had some insecurities and could be quite timid but that’s something we worked on and after that going for walks was the best thing she knew.

Such behavior is often grounded in fear or insecurity or just weird habits, sometimes dogs get weird fixes. However I can almost reassure you 100% that your dog would love walks if you let her to.
My girls are very small so I think size makes a difference but I also think with large dogs there are ways to offer adequate exercise without walks if needed. What I don't like seeing is everyone jump at someone who says they don't walk their pets. I guess in my opinion I feel the forum should be a welcoming place that shouldn't have the jumping of conclusions when it comes to asking advice. There's many ways to own pets, care for them and train them. I just feel people are more welcoming to advice when it's not being slammed down their throat. Not taking a dog for a walk doesn't make someone a bad pet owner. often times people can have health conditions that make walking a pet a very difficult thing, that doesn't mean they don't deserve the companionship of a pet.
 

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My girls are very small so I think size makes a difference but I also think with large dogs there are ways to offer adequate exercise without walks if needed. What I don't like seeing is everyone jump at someone who says they don't walk their pets. I guess in my opinion I feel the forum should be a welcoming place that shouldn't have the jumping of conclusions when it comes to asking advice. There's many ways to own pets, care for them and train them. I just feel people are more welcoming to advice when it's not being slammed down their throat. Not taking a dog for a walk doesn't make someone a bad pet owner. often times people can have health conditions that make walking a pet a very difficult thing, that doesn't mean they don't deserve the companionship of a pet.

maybe it is cultural but I'd like to know when it became a right to own an animal rather than a privilege.
The animal must always come first when we decided to adopt Murphy we thought about our age and the fact that we are not as fit as we were when we were 20 and we made sure that the dog that we got was one that we could cope with and not one that would suffer for our health conditions, that's not fair.

No one said the anyone didn't deserve a pet but you must put the animals welfare first.
Opinions were asked for and honest opinions were given but that seems to be non-pc these days we're all supposed to say "oh that's lovely " and let people do what the hell they want. But the animal comes first and those concerns should be voiced in my opinion.
 
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