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Z, Rescue Mutt
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I asked some questions about this on other threads, and got some very helpful answers. Thank you to the people who helped me out.
I do have more questions though, so here goes:
There seem to be 2 major types of undercoat rake, this type:
250194
and this type:
250193

in other words, straight rotating pins, and hooked blades.

1. Is one type better than the other?
2. Will the blades on the hooked type damage the topcoat?
3. How is the one with straight pins different from a comb?
4. Are they effective for removing mats, or should a separate tool be used?
5. And I know this is a very subjective thing, but: is one generally more comfortable than the other?
 

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I have both types. The rake with the round pins doesn't work on the Mini Aussie with long fur, or the Golden Retriever with medium long fur, and not the Border Collie/Lab cross either (short double coated fur).
They are all different and the rake must work on other dogs since they have been around for years.

maybe purchase from a lace where you can easily return them with no questions asked..ie Amazon,Walmart/

The one with the curved blades does remove a tiny amount of top coat, but I needed to look very closely.
I also lost a nice and pricey Mars Coat King to pippies, which is why my new Oster model is all metal.

Puppies will be puppies! :ROFLMAO:

250195
 

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For me, the difference is that one is an undercoat rake and the other is a mat breaker/undercoat stripper. I only use the latter when my poodle mix has a mat in his fur. I have never used that tool on a double coated dog, but rather use the undercoat rake with the pins to groom out the undercoat when the dog is shedding winter coat, and to maintain the coat the rest of the year. It depends on what kind of coat your dog has which you would use, and for what. The mat breaker/undercoat stripper can damage certain types of coats, so it's good to get professional advice (or the advice of someone who knows the breed well) as to which one to use on your dog.
 

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I'm sorry @Kensi, I went to respond to your other thread and the type wasn't working and then I just forgot. Ok, it's the andis tool that looks like this
20210415_183908.jpg

That's the pile of dull hair I got the first evening after receiving the tool.

It has curved blades so they won't irritate the skin and it feels more like a message. Not the straight pins, I haven't tried that yet. But I feel the blades are better to cut through any matted hair and drag out the dead/loose hairs.
(Don't mind the coffee drops on the counter haha).

I'll try a link to the one I have again
 

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If I go over the area too much, it will start to pull out a couple wire hairs, but as Buzzu2 mentioned, I really have to look through hard to notice them. I think mostly those top hairs were ready to be pulled.
Here's the US amazon link

I have a rotating teeth comb and I believe the only difference beteeen the straight pins Andis tool and a regular rotating tooth comb is the handler orientation.

Also the Andis tool I have is called the Andis deshedding tool.
 

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Z, Rescue Mutt
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone! One last thing- sorry, i'm super clueless. I know it's not extremely expensive, but that tool is on the more expensive side- is it actually worth the difference, or are the cheaper versions fine? (around 10-12 USD instead of 19) If it's worth it, I'll certainly go for it, but I'm always happy to save money where I can :)
 

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Thanks everyone! One last thing- sorry, i'm super clueless. I know it's not extremely expensive, but that tool is on the more expensive side- is it actually worth the difference, or are the cheaper versions fine? (around 10-12 USD instead of 19) If it's worth it, I'll certainly go for it, but I'm always happy to save money where I can :)
Ahhh I get you! I went with the tool that was suggested to me, but I thought about the cheaper ones. Just make sure it has sharp blades to cut through any matts. I would try the cheaper models, I just got the Andis. I'm sure it would be similar. Maybe I'd stick with the more spaced out blades (or more spaced out side of comb) to reduce chances of removing top coat fur.
 
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