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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I posted about my dog Bear in preparation for doing this DNA test, to see what people's initial impressions were based on looks. You guys did a pretty good job, and it looks like I was pretty close as well!

I got the results for my pup Bear, I finally know what he is! I have to say I was slightly surprised but I certainly see it now. I've been thinking he is an Akita/Husky or Akita/Shepherd...

But turns out, he is a Husky/Chow Chow! There is also a bit of Pitbull and Boxer thrown in. Do you guys see it?
 

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Huh, how about that! I can definitely see the Husky and some bully breed, but I can't say Chow is evident by looking at him.
 

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Isn't the Chow breed in the same breed family group as the Akita?? If so, that would explain why he looks like he has Akita. I imagine that the Husky breed's narrower features would mask a lot of the Chow appearance. Just a guess.

He is gorgeous. :D
 

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I would have guessed Husky/Akita.

The Chow as an asian Spitz type is going to be more closely related to the Akita and other native Japanese Spitz types than to more far flung spitzen relatives, but still not terribly closely related.

I've read a lot on wisdom panels, and it appears they build their database off of just a few dogs of each breed and look at odd areas of DNA, this can lead to false positives. Apparently you can call in and talk to the folks there and often times they can look at your specific results and can come up with alternate parentage if you question the results and back it up with dog appearance.

It could be that 10 of the 10 chows had marker X, and only 1 of the 10 akita had marker X, so if marker X is identified they say CHOW PARENT even though it is possible that it is an Akita parent.
 

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Interesting! I had a DNA test done on one of my dogs, and while the results showed all the breeds I thought it would, I felt like the percentages were off--after doing a little research and talking to some trainers of my dog's primary breed in the area my suspicions were confirmed. I rather think Chow and Akita are so similar, they could easily be mixed up by the database so don't discount it!

So basically, for my dog who is mostly Kelpie, Kelpie showed up but her DNA test only put Kelpie as a low-liklihood breed. Looking at it with an informed view, though, it's clear Kelpie is her primary breed.

Just something to keep in mind while interpreting results! Their statistical likelihood ratings can be a little off :)
 

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I find DNA tests to be taken with a grain of salt and for pure fun. These tests in my opinion are 'possible' breeds that make up ur pup. However ur pup is cute and my guess would have been way off.
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Discussion Starter #7
So far what I have seen online says that the Wisdom Panels have approx 90% accuracy, with some breeds occasionally being confused with similar types. Actually, I read a blog entry of someone who had her purebred Akita tested and he was actually misidentified as part husky! So, it looks like I was right from the beginning- he is a mix of pit bull, husky, and some Asian spitz-y types, could be chow chow or Akita!

He definitively has pit bull in him, I can see it in his face and body type. I believe his fur and size are due to the fact that he has some bully breed in him, I am inclined to believe it is America Pitbull Terrier. His personality is distinctly husky, from his play style to his prey drive and intelligence. I also believe that his protective instinct and stubbornness could be attributed to Akita/Asian guard dog type as well. I thought it was interesting and I'm glad to know that my first hunch was largely correct!
 

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Husky x Chow would certainly have lots more coat, has to have a short coated breed in him like Pitbull or Boxer. Very good looking dog, love his markings.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Akita and Pit Bull would have equally high prey drive as a Husky?
Pit bulls have a high prey drive too but their bloodlines are so incredibly varied and the "pit bull" is actually a name for several different specific breeds, so I would not take that into account in his personality. Akitas have very low prey drive, I am not sure why this is in the breed discription in many places, but everybody who I have ever talked to that works with Akitas does not include this is a common trait.

Huskies, on the other hand, are often noted for their desire to chase things, runs and are difficult to contain/bad with recall. This is certainly something I notice in him and I believe it would be a bigger problem if he were not so well trained and didn't have the husky blood tempered by other more "velcro" dogs.
 

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So far what I have seen online says that the Wisdom Panels have approx 90% accuracy
That's a funny joke, really. Best I've heard in a while.

Most, if not all, canine DNA tests are owned under an umbrella company... a candy company we know as Mars. The tests are a joke. I've known people with purebred dogs whose test results came back as mixes that don't include the actual breed at all (case and point, a Golden from a reputable breeder came back as some Chihuahua x small terrier breed mix; no lab mistake). It's literally like paying random forum folk like us to tell you what your dog is and assuming we're right. These companies prey on unknowing people for money... it's sick.

Your dog is really adorable though. His head looks rather Akita-like, and I'd lean more towards the American breed rather than Japanese. The ear shape and size I would pin on some Shepherd influence, likely. I honestly don't see any Chow, Husky (aside maybe Alaskan, which is just a type of mixed breed itself), or Boxer in him. BBM is likely since they are freaking everywhere.

I use the term "pit bull" only when referring to the APBT. After all, that is the only breed with the term actually in the name. They and everything else derived from them or similar too them are all included under "bully breed."

Akita can actually have HUGE prey drive and are very prone to aggression issues later on in life. Many even attack and kill their own littermates they have lived with for their entire lives. They were originally bred as fighting dogs, much like APBTs, but were more or less dropped from the ring because of larger breeds like the Tosa so they ended up becoming guardians and "babysitters." All of the many Akita I have known and lived with were hugely prey driven and were often taken out to chase deer. They, like Huskies, are very stubborn and bull-headed and are extremely difficult to train.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So far what I have seen online says that the Wisdom Panels have approx 90% accuracy
That's a funny joke, really. Best I've heard in a while.

Most, if not all, canine DNA tests are owned under an umbrella company... a candy company we know as Mars. The tests are a joke. I've known people with purebred dogs whose test results came back as mixes that don't include the actual breed at all (case and point, a Golden from a reputable breeder came back as some Chihuahua x small terrier breed mix; no lab mistake). It's literally like paying random forum folk like us to tell you what your dog is and assuming we're right. These companies prey on unknowing people for money... it's sick.

Your dog is really adorable though. His head looks rather Akita-like, and I'd lean more towards the American breed rather than Japanese. The ear shape and size I would pin on some Shepherd influence, likely. I honestly don't see any Chow, Husky (aside maybe Alaskan, which is just a type of mixed breed itself), or Boxer in him. BBM is likely since they are freaking everywhere.

I use the term "pit bull" only when referring to the APBT. After all, that is the only breed with the term actually in the name. They and everything else derived from them or similar too them are all included under "bully breed."

Akita can actually have HUGE prey drive and are very prone to aggression issues later on in life. Many even attack and kill their own littermates they have lived with for their entire lives. They were originally bred as fighting dogs, much like APBTs, but were more or less dropped from the ring because of larger breeds like the Tosa so they ended up becoming guardians and "babysitters." All of the many Akita I have known and lived with were hugely prey driven and were often taken out to chase deer. They, like Huskies, are very stubborn and bull-headed and are extremely difficult to train.
The accuracy rates that I am referencing of the Wisdom Panel are from outside sources who have done objective studies.
Of course they are not to be taken as gospel truth, but they are certainly more accurate than any other resource that I can use.

I firmly believe that he is a husky/pitbulls mix. His personality, mannerisms, and look all back that up. I think the chow chow could have been mistaken in his test for an Akita but it doesn't matter too much, as the other two breeds are pretty clear.

Akitas were not bred to fight, they may have been used as fighting dogs at some point in their history but that is neither their intended purpose or main usage. Originally the breed was developed for hunting large game, therefore while they may be inclined to chase a deer I have found that they don't pay much mind to the small furries that run around. I also have found that reliable recall is easy to instill and I have been able to call off my young Akita from chasing things that he was very interested in. It sounds like the Akitas you have been around have been unfortunate examples of the breed. From what I have experienced from researching and speaking to breed experts, as well as raising my own purebred, their aggressive tendancies are easily managed and rerouted. Also, they are incredibly trainable if approached in a fun and positive way. By 7 months old my puppy had all the necessary skills to pass his CGC test. I find them to be neither stubborn, bull headed, difficult to train, or aggressive, when raised by a confident and kind owner.
 

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@squidwanda - Then the people who performed those studies should talk to a lot of the people I have. GSD/Husky coming back as Lab/Poodle? Golden Retreiver as Chihuahua/Terrier? I'd have our Sibe tested just to see how wrong they are, but I'd rather not waste the money unless I was rolling in it. There are also actually no genetic profiles for APBT on the market anywhere (for legal reasons, but some do recognize AmStaff), so getting results saying so brings up a red flag for me.

Actually the only two that I knew that were really horrid examples were owned by my mother's ex, who was a BYB and overall nasty person who like mean dogs and beat them to make them that way. The others were all from pretty good breeders. The late-life aggression issues are actually extremely common. All of the reputable Akita breeders I've ever looked at or spoken to never recommend getting more than one Akita or having them live with other dogs. Small animals tend to be alright, as they were used at some point in history for larger game (the Akita Inu aren't called bear-dogs for no reason).

A lot of things do depend on raising. And a lot of things depend on the dog itself. Some dogs can be easier than others, even within the same breed. For example, my old GSD/Sibe boy was a freaking genius and was a pleasure to work with... at the same time someone in our training class was a great owner, but their Border Collie was as dumb as a sack of rocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Very true, my parents have a dog that essentially looks like a small Labrador but it came back as being a beagle/Goldie. Certainly the beagle is accurate, not sure about the others. I know that in this test specifically you can chose if your dog is a purebred, so I wonder if tested purebred dogs automatically leads to fallicies because the tests are designed to pick up trace genetic markers. I don't find it to be incredibly accurate, but certainly something that I would trust over a lay person's opinion. In the case of Bear, I think they probably got very close to the right mix.

There are so many different opinions on Akitas out there. Certainly the breed standard predicts aggression (especially dog aggression) and I am sure that many people see this develop in their animal. However I strongly agree that a large part of how the dog turns out is due to the individual personality and upbringing. I am also not the norm for an Akita owner. He was been brought up in a very fluid situation, he often meets new dogs and new people, we go on lots of trips together, he has been trained exclusively through force free methods, and I know a lot more about training and animal behavior than the average person. I think if most dogs were raised in a situation like mine- their potential for developing aggression would be very low, but certainly some have a genetic disposition that cannot be overcome.
 
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