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If you want to get rich quick, start selling designer dogs. I had no idea what a racket it was until I actually considered getting one. A lot of these 'breeders" are spaying and neutering puppies before they go to their new homes. I don't believe there is any other basis for this than business-they don't want anyone else breeding these dogs and stealing their profits.
I was astounded when I saw the prices for some of these dogs but it wasn't until I looked at a Cavachon (Bichon and Cavalier King Charles) breeder website, that I had to look twice at the prices-5000-$6500 for companion dogs! Maybe these dogs command these prices for a good reason. I don't breed them, so I don't know the costs involved. However, that sounds excessive to me.
There is so much controversy surrounding so many of these designer breeders but for non-shedding and low dander dogs, there are waiting lists a mile long. Breeders take non-refundable deposits months before a breeding ever occurs because they know if you won't part with your money, there are multiple other people who will. These breeders seem to cater to uninformed buyers and the first thing I noticed on many of their sites is a link to make payment.
I'm sure some of you own these types of dogs and I'm sure a lof of them are great dogs but I was genuinely shocked by the often, unethical breeding and business practices that I have seen, not to mention the prices that are turning people who would probably never commit to breeding sound purebred dogs, into millionaires.
What I wonder is, where are they getting their foundation dogs? From what I know, it is not that easy to get a good quality purebred breeding dog, which is what, presumably you'd need to get started with a hybrid program. Obvisouly, not all of the breeding dogs are high quality. I don't recall seeing any sires and dams, who had titles of any kind. This could have been an oversight on my part but a LOT of the breeders are not performing appropriate testing either. A lot of what's occurring is very deceitful and I was surprised by the waiting lists, given all of these issues.
 

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Those prices are excessive and most of the breeders of designer dogs aren't health testing. A good percentage are commercial breeders. The rest are backyard breeders. They can charge that price simply because people will pay it. Good old supply and demand.

Reputable breeders of cross breeds are very few and far between. The only reputable ones I am aware of tend to be breeding specifically for sports... think borderjacks and border x whippets bred by serious flyball people for the sport.

If you want a non-shedding dog there are enough recognized breeds and reputable breeders of those breeds out there to find a good fit. Narrow it down to a couple breeds and then visit their national breed clubs for referral lists. Look at their sites, visit shows to see their dogs in person, etc.

Not to mention plenty of non shedding dogs go through rescue and shelters. I got my curly coated, non shedding terrier mix at my local shelter. May not seem to be there if just popping in or looking online as non shedding dogs tend to be adopted quite quickly. Just the last few months we've had a doodle, several toy poodles, a yorkie, a bichon, several random curly coated mixes, and some wiry terrier mixes go through the shelter. Most were adopted out in a couple of days before photos were even put on petfinder or facebook.
 

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It is very, very, very easy to get your foundation dogs.

All you need to do is find a back yard breeder, or pet store, that is selling the breeds you want and buy them. Say I want to breed a Labradoodle, I just need to look on Craig's list for Labradors and Poodles, right now there are 5 ads on Craig's List for poodles near where I live, one wants $700 for a 18 month old female, and I found a AKC full blood yellow, male, lab, that has a small rehoming fee. I go buy those two dogs, let the lab grow up and get old enough to breed, begin producing puppies, and I sell them for 2k each. I am not the producer of Labradoodles.

I have a Chi x Dach (notice I do not call him a Chiweenie, he is not a pure bred dog, he is a mixed breed dog) I got him from a friend who, got him from her daughter, who got him from her father (friend's ex). My friend raised him from the age of 5 weeks old, to the age of 1 year 1 month old, then gave him to me. From what I have been told the mother was an older, pure bred, Dach. that had never been spayed. Father was a Chi that hopped the fence. The result is Zody, the dog in my avatar. Now here's the problem, Zody at the age of 2 was diagnosed with luxating patella in both knees, he has environmental allergies, and food sensitivities, along with being fear aggressive. All of those a good breeder would have screened for and not bred dogs if they had those issues. Most breeders of designer dogs do not care about such things and will breed dogs despite any health or temperament problems.
 

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Ours is half Poodle half Bischon, though we found her at the local shelter. I'm pretty sure she came from some breeder, though all the shelter could tell us was she had been picked up as a stray. We got her when she was about a year old, that was over seven years ago. So far we have been pretty fortunate with health, she has had some allergy issues, some reactions to drugs, but at over eight years old, no apparent congenital defects or issues. I can only guess that someone paid lots of $$'s for her from the breeder, but since we rescued her from the shelter, we didn't. She is the absolute definition of a 'dream dog', well behaved, happy, well adjusted, loving, not destructive, and just completely enjoyable to have living with us. I realize we were and are very lucky and fortunate to have found her and to have her with us, and that good fortune is not lost on us.
 

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My current dog is actually the longest haired dog I've ever had--long, silky hair--and sheds the least. In fact, he barely sheds at all. I have no idea what mix he is, as he was a stray who was turned over to a humane society after he was found wandering the streets of a nearby city. He was about nine months old when I got him, and they thought he had been on his own for two or three months, given his condition. He's four now, and so far, he's had no particular health problems, he's been working as a certified therapy dog for three years, has his rally novice title, and has been in a beginning agility class--which he loves--for the last five weeks. I, too, understand that I'm lucky, and that not all strays of unidentified backgrounds are going to have similar qualities, but then, neither are all designer dogs. Or even purebred dogs, for that matter. What I do know is that I certainly paid nowhere near $4,000 for him or even $400. I'm not criticizing people who choose to pay for a particular breed or even cross, but I do agree that you have to be careful if you go that route because if the breeder is unscrupulous, you're not getting what you've been promised.

I should add that I wasn't particularly looking for a non-shedding dog, as all my dogs have had long or longish hair, and they've all shed. It's just an odd anomaly that my current dog has the longest hair of all the dogs I've ever had, and he sheds the least.

I've also been told by the director of the humane society where I got him that in their area, there's someone who's bred smallish dogs he claims are a breed he completely made up for years now. If he has too many that aren't selling, he simply turns them loose and calls in stray puppies to the area's animal control. They did not think that was the case with my dog, as he doesn't fit the type of dog this man breeds at all and he came in without the aforementioned suspicious call, but it just goes to show how unconcerned some alleged breeders of specialty mixes can be. At least the local humane society/shelter there doesn't euthanize unless the animal is terribly ill or too injured to save, but he has no idea if the animals he turns loose will make it there, even with the phone call, since they could be killed in traffic etc. before they're found. He refuses to take them to the humane society himself because that would establish a traceable pattern, and whatever reputation he can fake for himself as a reliable breeder would be gone.
 

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I've never much cared for the "designer breed" business. There is a place about a 30 minute drive from my house that specializes in designer breeds that seems to always have the most popular ones. It's pretty much a puppy mill situation to me.

I've known people that bought a labradoodle that was close to $1500, and one person I knew bought a $3000 puggle.

I do have a borador, which I got from the local SPCA, which is a no kill shelter that saves dogs from animal controls before they are euthanized. I've seen puppies selling for $900-1200. I paid a $125 adoption fee that was recycled back into the shelter to help with the other dogs. I didn't go out looking for a designer dog, Baxter just happened to be the dog best matched for our lifestyle. I filled out a long application and the shelter introduced us to 3 dogs, and he was the one that immediately licked both my husband's and my face upon meeting him.

When my husband adopted our chow shepard, which I guess is another popular designer breed, she was a very little puppy from a shelter in North Carolina. He paid less for her. She was found wandering around the street by herself at 3 or 4 months old. I've seen her mix selling for more than a chow or german shepard would cost if you bought from a breeder. Which makes no sense at all considering the base dogs usually don't have papers.

I'm a huge supporter of getting dogs from shelters. Both our dogs have been amazingly good pets. Sasha is extremely well behaved, and Baxter is the happiest and most playful dog I've ever had. (Sasha is sophisticated lady, lol.) Unless you really want a pure bred dog that you need for a specific reason, I don't really understand why you would pay a breeder a exuberant amount of money for what basically is a mutt. There are plenty of homeless mutts that are really amazing pups that need homes.
 

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Biscuit was always going to be my dog, but he was a family decision. That means my parents had to agree on him, and my mom didn't want a shelter dog. She's not the biggest dog person, so she doesn't have to own one. I know that when I get another dog (probably when Biscuit is 5 or 6, still not sure on that one), there's a 90% chance it will be from a shelter, since it won't be a family dog. But when we got Biscuit, he was a partial family dog, and my parents had the final word.

My job was to give them the breed, breeder, etc. of the dog I wanted. Their job was to (hopefully) say yes. I had waited my whole life for a dog, and I was dedicated. I knew all the breeds and their temperaments by heart, and I couldn't wait. I finally decided on either a Goldendoodle or a Border Collie. This is what happens when you let a teenager choose her own dog! Fortunately, they ruled out Border Collies for being too high-energy, so I was left with Goldendoodles. I researched breeders, and all over the web, I found people saying "there are so many Goldendoodles in shelters! Adopt one of those!" Even though my mom wasn't keen on shelter dogs, I visited many shelter websites, including resources like Doodle Rescue Collective. Not one doodle of any sort within 10 hours of me. But we were getting a dog, so we got one.

The breeder we got Biscuit from is a business. We saw all the kennels, and I wasn't impressed. Would I do it again? Never. But (and you'll hate me for saying this!) I have no regrets. Biscuit is the love of my life, and I would never regret getting him. I hope we didn't add to 'the problem' by purchasing him, but he was already born. He was going to go to someone, and I'm grateful every day that that someone was me.

As someone who purchased a designer dog from a breeder, I wanted to weigh in with my experience. Hopefully you won't all hate me for where I got Biscuit.
 

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You are providing Biscuit a good and loving home, that's what is really important, you need not apologize for anything. Keep caring for and giving Biscuit the love he deserves, which he will return in spades. Dogs are amazing.
 

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I wouldn't apologize for that, it sounds like it was out of your control anyway. Plus when I was a 13, my mom did the same thing for our family dog. We had other dogs, but they were working dogs, not house pets. She was pretty adamant about not getting a dog from a shelter, even though my sister and I had pick out a golden retriever mix at the SPCA when a friend adopted one of its litter mates. Instead my mother got us a $2500 AKC bred English Cocker Spaniel, which ended up having epilepsy and was one of the worst dogs I've ever had. So, you got lucky with your dog.

I don't really understand why so many people are put off by shelter dogs. Our recent experience was nothing but positive, and the volunteers at the SPCA made sure we were going home with a dog that fit our family and that we would be prepared.
 

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I don't really understand why so many people are put off by shelter dogs. Our recent experience was nothing but positive, and the volunteers at the SPCA made sure we were going home with a dog that fit our family and that we would be prepared.
Well I have had a bad experience adopting my dog, with all of her health and behavioral issues, and it's definitely scared my parents away from adopting their next dog, unfortunately. It's partly my fault for adopting a dog I hadn't met, but I think the rescue definitely misled me when I had told them what I was looking for in a dog. And I know a lot of people who have been turned off of adopting for similar reasons.

There are a lot of rescues, and even local shelters here, just transporting dogs up from the South, because we don't have a lot of unwanted/stray dogs of our own up here, and rescue is "trendy." And some of them are doing a very good job with it but others are doing a terrible job. They have bit off more than they can chew, or have no idea what they're doing, or are trying to adopt out as many dogs as possible without thinking about making the right matches with owners, or without disclosing health or behavioral issues, bringing up sick dogs, etc. So I know a lot of people who have had bad experiences because of this and as a result get their next dog from a breeder. I personally plan to adopt more rescues in the future, but I also want to buy healthy, mentally stable, structurally sound dogs from breeders as well. I just feel there's more of a guarantee that way.





Anyways, I had a cockapoo growing up and she was the best dog ever. She was nothing but sweet and friendly and well behaved, the opposite of my current dog. Shedding happened, but it was very low. My mom and sister have bad allergies to dogs and weren't allergic to Mia. She had a perfect temperament and energy level for a family dog. So I can understand why people would want a dog like that. She really did have the best traits of the poodle and the cocker spaniel combined.

I honestly toy with the idea of breeding cockapoos myself someday. Not to make an obscene amount of money, because I wouldn't charge thousands of dollars, but rather so there's someone out there who is doing it ethically. Health testing, titling dogs, being honest with buyers. Also I just think they're really awesome, versatile little family dogs that are a good option for allergy sufferers. And in my own search for breeders (I've looked for a variety of purebreds and crosses) I have found cockapoo breeders who are doing a decent job with health testing and taking good care of their dogs, breeders I would be comfortable purchasing from, but I think there's still room for improvement. But I think how you breed is much more important than what you breed. There are plenty of unethical breeders of purebreds as well. In fact, I think puppy mills probably breed just as many purebred dogs, if not more, than crosses.
 

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Designer dogs sell, there's no doubt about it. People generally do not do their research and are easily convinced that a particular breed "won't shed", is "hypoallergenic" or "won't bark".

My current dog is a mutt - lab x border collie. I love her and think she's amazing but I am under no false assumption that she is anything other than a mutt. She excels at everything we do. She's focused, driven, kind and honest but I'm not going to start breeding lab x bc mixes haha. She was a rescue and my next dog will be a border collie from a breeder. I, personally, don't think either path is wrong as long as they are both reputable. There are unethical rescues just as there are unethical breeders. People make a lot of money in 'rescue'. ;)

I see a lot of purposefully bred mixes in flyball - borderjacks, border whippets... I don't think there's anything wrong with this either. These dogs are bred with a purpose and are sold to sport homes. Just like any other reputable breeder, they can be returned to the breeder if it doesn't work out. These dogs also aren't priced higher than purebreds. They are bred to get these mixes into the sport world. (I can only speak to the breeders that I know of. I'm sure there are some that do not fit in this category).

Ultimately, as long as the dogs are being responsibly bred and placed, I don't have a huge negative opinion about it. Designer dogs breeders are charging through the nose because they can. When people stop paying those prices, they will either stop breeding or lower their prices.
 

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That's all really understandable. My family bred siberian huskies for dog sledding. They haven't done so since the early 1990s, but I remember one of the big things we were able to say was "no" to a potential adopted if they didn't seem like a good fit. And if we had a dog born that was showing any early issue signs, we wouldn't adopt them out and would keep them with our personal mushing dogs.

I've never had an issue with the SPCA or the rescue groups in Richmond, VA, or the ones back in NY where I used live. I've volunteered at the SPCA, I donate money to the SPCA regularly, and I've adopted a few animals from them.

I will agree that not all shelters are alike. We have an animal control shelter here that I've heard nothing but bad things about. They have a 2 week window before euthanizing dogs, and run $10 adoption weekends that coincide with a lot of the holidays. The local SPCA has worked with them by taking as many adoptable dogs as they can before they are euthanized. Most of the dogs left behind are untrained pitbulls, elderly/sick dogs, or dogs that probably shouldn't be adopted. Yet animal control will adopt those out to anyone who wants them.
 

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@Dogs4Jesus Well I couldn't criticize you for getting Biscuit and not regretting it, because I'd have to have had regrets from how I got Shadow. I got him from a pet shop.

I was 19, had moved out on my own, and really wanted a puppy. I had been to the LASPCA and the only puppies they had looked very sickly, I did not want an adult dog. I was at the mall one day and wandered in to the pet shop. I knew not to get pure bred puppies from such a place, and that pet shop did sell pure bred puppies, but that day they also had a litter of mixed breed puppies that they were selling for around $200, which included the shots the puppies had received, the vet check, a kennel, and a bag of food. I saw Shadow and was in love. I had to have him! So I got him and in the 17 years I had him in my life not once did I regret getting him, but I did have remorse for where he came from. Would I do it again? Heck, no! I won't even buy a $1 clicker from a pet shop that sells pure bred puppies.
 

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I am on my 2nd Pomapoo/Pompom and dearly love these loving dogs wo any apologies! Full bred dog breeders love this type of negativity - so they can corner the $ market. As for homing an abused, older dog wo knowing the history is not for me. We did adopt a loving pup 9 yrs ago (from a humane society)that recently passed, a “mutt” that turned out to be the best furbaby we ever had. Idc if a dog is a mutt or full breed, I am mostly interested in personality, temperament, and compatibility. For any dog/pup, health issues will always be a crap shoot, meaning luck plays a big part. Bf I paid for my 2nd Pomapoo, I had a bad exp w the local humane society. I just lost my precious 1st Pomapoo of 13 1/2 yrs, and wanted to adopt a pup/young dog from there. I found one I fell in love with, and was told to come back the next day bc he was just clipped and neutered. I called the next morning and was hung up on when the girl found out I was calling about Boomer. I called back 2nd time, left a message of my intent to adopt which they knew from the previous day, and never received a call back from them. The attitude from the receptionist was cold and put offish. I went that AM to see Boomer. He was gone - not on the premises. I was steered towards a nice, senior dg that could hardly move and was assured how nice this dog was instead! There were no puppies but alot of Pitt Bulls/mixes. I was informed that someone at the humane society was adopting Boomer, bc her husband gave her permission! I feel I should have been told he was a possible adoptee, and was told they don’t give that info in case an adoption falls thru - however they post notices on cages that an adoption is in progress! I was also told they do not have a waiting list in case an adoption falls thru either. I feel I should have bern told the circumstance, rather than being strung along as I was. I will never donate or adopt from the humane society for this reason. So for me, respect and honesty goes not only both ways, but a long way as well. I gladly paid for my 2nd Pomapoo.
 
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