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Hello everybody!
I‘m curious to what everybody here thinks about designer breeds (specifically doodles), as me and my family has been planning on purchasing one once we move to a bigger house with a backyard. I know that it’s really hard to find a reputable breeder for these mixes, but we’re up for a challenge! Basically, I’m just wondering if these mixed breeds are worthwhile, if you’re willing to put in the effort of finding a good breeder for them.
Thank you for the help!
They tend to be much more balance with less health issues actually. Due to breed related issues not being reinforced genetically
 

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They tend to be much more balance with less health issues actually. Due to breed related issues not being reinforced genetically
I'm afraid that it's not quite that simple. It's only after many, many generations that this is achieved.

A friend describes it like this.

If you had an inheritable health issue in a breed, we can make an analogy to having a stew with carrots. You want to get rid of the carrots, so you mix the stew with a different type, one without carrots. But the resulting mix still has some carrots. You need to mix that with another stew without carrots. Yet, you still will have some carrots in the new stew. It takes many mixes to become carrot free.

So breeding out health issues won't happen in a first cross, or even after several.
 

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One thing to consider is that breeds exist in the first place because people wanted to concentrate characteristics they considered desirable. Size, color, temperament, physical quirks, behavioral traits all have a strong genetic component. Too much outcrossing can destroy the very traits for which a breed was selected. A collie that won't herd or a setter that won't point are not useful to a shepherd or a hunter. Someone living in a condo or an HOA with a 30 pound pet limit faces a tough decision when their puppy matures to 40 pounds. Someone with allergies might need a dog guaranteed not to shed. A well bred dog should have at least the regular size, coat texture, and temperament of its breed.

Of course, too much inbreeding will destroy a breed as easily as too little. Dalmatians are known for bladder stones; every single purebred Dalmatian in existence has a mutation affecting their ability to excrete uric acid. Standard Poodles have a high level of auto-immune diseases; it is thought this issue traces back to loss of diversity caused by the post-WWII Mid-Century bottleneck. Some standard breeders are outcrossing to miniatures in hopes of reducing autoimmune issues in their lines while maintaining other poodle characteristics.

The thing about outcrossing is that it doesn't always solve problems. Even if you don't care about losing the physical appearance of your breed (your Golden Retriever's offspring are no longer golden; your Corgi's offspring are all long legged) you still don't necessarily eliminate your breed's problems by outcrossing to another breed. The gene associated with IVDD is found in many small dog breeds. Crossing a miniature poodle to a cocker spaniel could still produce an IVDD prone litter, because both breeds have a high number of carriers.
 

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@Amberloo777 I have edited the link to the seller from your post as linking to sales sites is not permitted.

If your dog is non-shedding, you are fortunate - crossing a dog that sheds with one that doesn't still leaves the chance of the shedding gene being passed to the puppies. Non-shedding is sales hype.
 
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