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The replies above explain very well why you will struggle to find an ethical breeder.

But what do you think one of these crosses will offer you that you can't find in a well bred poodle, or maltese, or cocker? What is it that draws you to them? If it is the look, a poodle left in a shaggy clip is indistinguishable from some of the crosses (I say some, as a crossbreed dog's coat is unpredictable).

If you can tell us what you are looking for in a dog we may be able to make suggestions.
 

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I agree that sounds like it's a bit light on exercise for most dogs. Could that be increased?

The crosses you suggested are not guaranteed to be non shedding, if a poodle is crossed with a dog that sheds. But some people are allergic to dander or saliva, and all dogs have these. Do you know what your family member is allergic to?
 

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I don't think any of us are pointing fingers. You won't get any argument that a truly responsibly bred cross is better than a poorly bred pedigree.

But, good breeders of crosses are rare. After going to the time, trouble and expense of doing the tests, it would be far easier to find a suitable pairing from within the breed, one that complements the dog you have. And to cross, you would need to find another owner who had not only done all the tests but who also was prepared to allow their quality dog to cross.

Your associate did well to find the dog that she got. Although I wonder how the competing breed traits manifested.
 

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A Bichon does sound like a good fit.

Can I ask you to please read this thread about spotting puppy mills and buying safely?

 

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They tend to be much more balance with less health issues actually. Due to breed related issues not being reinforced genetically
I'm afraid that it's not quite that simple. It's only after many, many generations that this is achieved.

A friend describes it like this.

If you had an inheritable health issue in a breed, we can make an analogy to having a stew with carrots. You want to get rid of the carrots, so you mix the stew with a different type, one without carrots. But the resulting mix still has some carrots. You need to mix that with another stew without carrots. Yet, you still will have some carrots in the new stew. It takes many mixes to become carrot free.

So breeding out health issues won't happen in a first cross, or even after several.
 

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@Amberloo777 I have edited the link to the seller from your post as linking to sales sites is not permitted.

If your dog is non-shedding, you are fortunate - crossing a dog that sheds with one that doesn't still leaves the chance of the shedding gene being passed to the puppies. Non-shedding is sales hype.
 
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